“Without Bruce Springsteen there would be no Vietnam veterans movement.” —Bob Muller, head of the Vietnam Veterans of America, 1981

Bruce Springsteen recorded this song for the closing credits of the movie Thank You For Your Service. The film drama is based on the real-life experiences of Iraq War veteran Adam Schumann. Springsteen recorded the song at his Stone Hill Studio in Colts Neck, New Jersey and recruited Schumann and Thank You For Your Service producer Jon Kilik as backup singers. As well as supplying lead vocals, The Boss also contributes banjo and harmonium. Springsteen took melodic inspiration from the soldiers’ marching cadence called “Freedom.” (Often known as “Some Say Freedom is Free.”) “Adam had a cadence that they sang in boot camp, and [Kilik] recorded him singing it on his cell phone,” director Jason Hall told Backsteets.com. “Jon is friends with Bruce and played it for him. Bruce was like, ‘Oh, that’s cool. How’d the movie turn out?’ ‘Movie turned out great.’ We played him the movie. Bruce loved it, watched it twice, and then said, ‘Send me that recording, come back in a month, and bring that kid.’ So Adam went up there with Jon and recorded the song with him.” —from Songfacts

Some say freedom is free, but I tend to disagree
I say freedom is won through the barrel of a gun
Had a brother in Iraq, he didn’t come back
I ask why oh why do soldiers gotta die
Some say freedom is free, but I tend to disagree
I say freedom is won through the blood of someone’s son

Some say freedom is free, but I tend to disagree
I say freedom is won through the barrel of a gun
Daddy died in Vietnam, he was killed at Khe Sahn
I ask why oh why do soldiers gotta die
Some say freedom is free, but I tend to disagree
I say freedom is won through the blood of someone’s son

Some say freedom is free, but I tend to disagree
I say freedom is won through the barrel of a gun
Had a brother in Iraq, he didn’t come back
I ask why oh why do soldiers gotta die

Hmm hmm hmm hmm hmm hmm, hmm hmm hmm hmm hmm hmm..

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