C.S. Lewis in the Deep South

By |2019-04-13T16:06:57-05:00April 13th, 2019|

With a dream, hard work, and real sacrifice, the good Christian people at Bob Jones University have created something beautiful and real. By creating Narnia onstage, they are captivating the imaginations of a new generation of children and sneaking them past the ever-watchful and increasingly dangerous dragons of secular materialism. When I left Bob [...]

C.S. Lewis and the Truth of Balder

By |2019-03-22T14:11:46-05:00March 22nd, 2019|

C.S. Lewis’ famous conversation with Hugo Dyson and J.R.R. Tolkien, allowed him, for the first time in his life, to see that Christianity expresses not just myth, but true myth, something profoundly real, “a myth working on us in the same way as the others, but with this tremendous difference that it really happened.” [...]

Conflicted But Redeemed: James Como’s Life of C.S Lewis

By |2019-03-11T23:38:21-05:00March 11th, 2019|

James Como’s C.S Lewis: A Very Short Introduction is delightful and is the single finest biographical survey yet written on the Oxford don. In a little more than one hundred pages, you’ll happily come to know the complexities of the most famous convert to Christianity in the twentieth century. C.S. Lewis: A Very Short Introduction, [...]

Mark Hollis, Rest Your Head

By |2019-02-26T16:38:19-05:00February 26th, 2019|

On February 25, 2019, at age sixty-four, Mark David Hollis passed away. Though he had not been active for more than two decades in the music industry, his death is a great loss to the art world. Hollis was the “J.D. Salinger of the rock world” but, frankly, much cooler and much more talented. He [...]

Surprised by Jack

By |2019-02-26T20:44:19-05:00February 25th, 2019|

C.S. Lewis’s writings are endlessly fascinating because the man himself was endlessly fascinating—to himself as well as to others. He saw life as a sort of drama and art, one in which the will shapes what Providence has so generously provided. One can readily and happily delve into C.S. Lewis’s autobiography of 1955, Surprised [...]

“Tolkien” the Film: Wormtongue’s Revenge?

By |2019-02-15T13:58:20-05:00February 15th, 2019|

A new film, simply titled Tolkien, purports to depict the author’s formative years as a child and young man, but will, I fear, show only a perverted and distorted version of the truth, weaving lies in a manner of which Wormtongue himself would be proud... I hate to say it, but I think that Wormtongue [...]

Christopher Dawson and the Nature of Progress

By |2019-02-04T22:38:27-05:00January 28th, 2019|

An understanding of progress and its adherents was not just of academic curiosity to Christopher Dawson. It was central to understanding the good life and preventing those who misunderstood history from gaining control and imposing the will of man upon the creation of God… “What has happened will happen again, and what has been [...]

Beauty and the Imagination

By |2019-02-01T10:10:26-05:00January 27th, 2019|

The imagination is a gift from God, given in His own image, to conceive of a Glorious Reality that does exist, that we cannot yet fully see... Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords our readers the opportunity to join Aaron Ames, as he considers the Divine source of beauty and imagination.—W. Winston Elliott [...]

Tucker Carlson: The New G.K. Chesterton?

By |2019-01-17T22:36:04-05:00January 17th, 2019|

Rather than being condemned as a manipulative populist feeding the people’s paranoia, Tucker Carlson should be commended for asking us to reconsider the first principles of conservatism, and for addressing the same ideas that G.K Chesterton also believed to be a threat to society: materialism, imperialism, feminism, and progressivism... Responding to Mitt Romney’s op-ed in [...]

Being Christopher Dawson’s Friend

By |2019-02-04T22:39:36-05:00January 16th, 2019|

Despite all Christopher Dawson’s quirks and social fears, friends flocked to him; together, they read poetry, discussed philosophy, farmed, and made crafts. Would there have been a European renaissance of Christian Humanism without this friendship centered around “Tiger Dawson”? Almost certainly not… Though he might very well have been the most important Christian Humanist intellectual [...]

The Tower of Babel and Charles Péguy’s Defeatist Optimism

By |2019-01-15T21:43:51-05:00January 15th, 2019|

Latent in the seeds of all social movements, Charles Péguy asserted, are invariably good intentions: altruism, the common good, solidarity, or perhaps the search for truth. Why, then, must they all end in politics? One of the most influential public intellectuals of the French belle époque, Charles Péguy, had every reason to be weary of [...]

The Classics and Christianity

By |2019-01-11T15:44:57-05:00January 11th, 2019|

Christians invented the classical curriculum; it is as much part of the broader Western inheritance as it is specifically part of the Christian inheritance… Why study old books? How do dusty old books written by dead men and women thousands of years ago grow my faith? Such can be common thoughts when the Christian [...]

Conversations on Christian Humanism

By |2019-01-06T13:39:27-05:00January 6th, 2019|

Christians, in alliance with believing Jews and even virtuous pagans, must sanctify the world through the Grace of God. For men of good will to fight amongst themselves squanders precious time and resources, and it leaves the field to the Enemy... As I noted in my previous essay on Christian Humanism, Gleaves Whitney first introduced me—at least [...]