Storytelling and How We Learn

By |2019-03-07T00:06:27-05:00March 6th, 2019|Categories: Civilization, Culture, Education|

Stories convey wisdom about ourselves, our culture, and human nature. The existence of Bigfoot or the Abominable Snowman is more believable than the existence of a civilized people who have no need of poets or sages. Whatever I teach, I teach storytelling because it is an expression of human creativity that provides perspective. Stories help [...]

On Loving Writing

By |2019-03-01T16:12:44-05:00March 1st, 2019|Categories: Bradley J. Birzer, Love, Senior Contributors, Writing|

Few things in life have given me as much pleasure as writing has. I’ve never been what anyone would describe as “low-energy,” but I’ve also not always been exactly sure how to release my own energies, especially when it came to writing. I’ve also always possessed the creative impulse, but that impulse was frustrated [...]

Roots of the World: The Program of St. John’s College

By |2019-02-27T14:12:28-05:00February 25th, 2019|Categories: E.B., Education, Eva Brann, In Honor of Eva Brann at 90 Series, Liberal Arts, Liberal Learning, St. John's College|

Every plan of education is fraught with implicit philosophical principle. Since the program of St. John's College is devoted to that peculiar kind of learning which of necessity includes a reflection on its own conditions, most members of the college accept the obligation of engaging in ever-recurrent discussion and review of the philosophical bases that [...]

Remembering To Be

By |2019-02-25T10:40:37-05:00February 24th, 2019|Categories: Charles Dickens, Education, Glenn Arbery, Liberal Learning, Literature, Timeless Essays, Wyoming Catholic College|

“Forgetfulness of being”—perhaps we could also call it “forgetfulness of givenness”—underlies most of the problems that we face. To forget being means to forget how astonishing it is that anything exists at all... Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords our readers the opportunity to join Glenn Arbery, as he ponders the wonder of [...]

Pillars of Liberty: The Moral Virtues

By |2019-02-22T15:26:25-05:00February 21st, 2019|Categories: Audio/Video, Character, Civil Society, Education, Liberal Learning, Louis Markos, Virtue|

Dr. Louis Markos explains how the problem in today's education is not that virtue is forgotten, but that only certain "pseudo-virtues" are being taught. We're raising a generation of people who say, "Well, yeah, I do sleep around. But I recycle cans and so it's okay." We've thrown out the sins against morality and replaced [...]

On Loving Definitions

By |2019-02-18T22:11:33-05:00February 18th, 2019|Categories: Books, Bradley J. Birzer, Education, Senior Contributors, Tradition, Western Tradition|

I first came across Russell Kirk’s belief that academics must serve as guardians of “the Word” in his groundbreaking but now sadly-neglected book, Academic Freedom: An Essay in Definition (1955). “The principle support to academic freedom, in the classical world, the medieval world, and the American educational tradition, has been the conviction, among scholars and [...]

Odysseus: Patron Hero of the Liberal Arts

By |2019-02-25T14:28:17-05:00February 4th, 2019|Categories: Audio/Video, Classics, E.B., Education, Eva Brann, Great Books, Homer, In Honor of Eva Brann at 90 Series, Liberal Arts, Liberal Learning, Odyssey, St. John's College|

Odysseus has the art we need. I think he came by it through a rare combination of acutely honed cleverness and deep-souled imagination; we can acquire it by education. This art, the art of discovering significance, is the art of interpretation... I am to write about my hero Odysseus and to connect him to Liberal [...]

Edgar Allan Poe’s “Eldorado”

By |2019-02-02T16:46:02-05:00February 1st, 2019|Categories: Culture, Edgar Allan Poe, Literature, Poetry, Writing|

From a compositional and conceptual standpoint, “Eldorado” is arguably Edgar Allan Poe’s greatest poem. It is a perfect example of how a seemingly simple theme can be thoroughly developed using new rich metaphors, which allow human beings to communicate what is otherwise not possible with merely literal forms of communication… Editor’s Note: The author [...]

A New Standard, Timeless Truths

By |2019-01-25T15:47:30-05:00January 22nd, 2019|Categories: Civilization, Classical Education, Education, Liberal Arts, Liberal Learning|

Some might wonder, is it a bad thing if liberal arts are on their way out? Are they worth reviving or even discussing? In November 2018, The University of Wisconsin at Stevens Point announced its plan to discontinue six liberal arts majors. The move garnered national attention and gave rise to a plethora of varying [...]

An Education to Restore Wonder

By |2018-12-29T23:07:55-05:00December 29th, 2018|Categories: Classical Education, Classical Learning, Classics, Education, Great Books, Liberal Arts, Liberal Learning, Wyoming Catholic College|

We’ve reached a time when fewer and fewer on the outside know what the liberal arts are, or the value of them to the individual person, an organization, and the marketplace of ideas. In an age when people are so focused on science and technology via “STEM” subjects, we’ve lost our sense of wonder… [...]

A Classical Educational Creed

By |2018-12-28T22:20:55-05:00December 28th, 2018|Categories: Classical Education, Classical Learning, Education, Liberal Arts|

Classical educators agree on the ends of liberal education, namely, the possession of the true, good, and beautiful, wisdom, and the development of the intellectual and imaginative powers that enable their attainment. But the pedagogical means to these ends are less obvious. Here is an attempt to set out a set of principles and [...]