Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

About Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882) was a Massachusetts professor and poet, widely considered to be the most popular American poet of his day. His works include such famous poems as Paul Revere's Ride, Evangeline, and The Song of Hiawatha.

“Paul Revere’s Ride”

By |2020-04-19T08:33:11-05:00April 18th, 2020|Categories: American Revolution, Poetry|

Listen, my children, and you shall hear Of the midnight ride of Paul Revere, On the eighteenth of April, in Seventy-Five: Hardly a man is now alive Who remembers that famous day and year. He said to his friend, — "If the British march By land or sea from the town to-night, Hang a lantern [...]

A Psalm of Life

By |2017-06-13T09:24:52-05:00June 12th, 2016|Categories: Death, Poetry|

What the Heart of the Young Man Said to the Psalmist. Tell me not, in mournful numbers, “Life is but an empty dream!” For the soul is dead that slumbers, And things are not what they seem. Life is real! Life is earnest! And the grave is not its goal; “Dust thou art, to [...]

Evangeline: A Tale of Acadie

By |2017-06-14T14:42:54-05:00September 13th, 2015|Categories: Poetry|

                This is the forest primeval. The murmuring pines and the hemlocks, Bearded with moss, and in garments green, indistinct in the twilight, Stand like Druids of eld, with voices sad and prophetic, Stand like harpers hoar, with beards that rest on their bosoms. Loud from its rocky [...]

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