Unearthed History: The War of The Vendée

By |2019-04-23T23:44:18-05:00April 23rd, 2019|Categories: Catholicism, Europe, History, Revolution|

The series of battles that took place in the Vendée have been almost entirely excluded from any recounting of the Revolution. Why? The rising in the Vendée paints a darker picture of the evils that Revolutionists did to those citizens, most of them peasants, who would not adopt the principles of the Revolution. Something about the [...]

A Tale of Two Resurrections

By |2019-04-21T00:06:15-05:00April 20th, 2019|Categories: Books, Charles Dickens, Christianity, Literature, Paul Krause, Senior Contributors|

Charles Dickens’ A Tale of Two Cities is a picturesque story that deliberately mirrors the most famous picturesque story of all time: the Biblical story, which culminates in Christ’s death and resurrection, and which in turn brings life back to a lifeless world. “With a roar that sounded as if all the breath in [...]

Easter Movies: “Hail Caesar!” and “Risen”

By |2019-04-19T22:19:29-05:00April 19th, 2019|Categories: Christianity, Culture, Film|

Movie-watching may not be as common a pastime at Easter as on other holidays, but the Easter movie is a true genre—and an important one. The mystery of Christ’s death and resurrection lends itself to, perhaps even demands, pictorial realization like no other story. This was shown preeminently during the heyday of biblical epics [...]

Good Friday, Good Bureaucrats, and the Good Roman

By |2019-04-19T11:08:10-05:00April 18th, 2019|Categories: Christianity, Joseph Mussomeli, Politics, Virtue|

On this Good Friday, as we ponder the suffering Christ endured, we should not forget the pivotal role of that good and decent bureaucrat Pilate in facilitating that crime. Nor forget the bureaucratic crimes committed daily on the sacrificial altars of obedience and expedience. Thus spoke Nietzsche: “Must I add that, in the whole [...]

John With Jesus: From Passover to the Garden of Gethsemane

By |2019-04-19T02:24:54-05:00April 17th, 2019|Categories: Barbara J. Elliott, Catholicism, Christianity, Gospel Reflection, Senior Contributors, Timeless Essays|

Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords our readers the opportunity to join Barbara Elliott, as she portrays the events of the Last Supper to Jesus’ prayer in the Garden of Gethsemane from the perspective of the Apostle John. —W. Winston Elliott III, Publisher I went with Peter to make the arrangements for [...]

Mass of Notre Dame

By |2019-04-15T23:17:07-05:00April 15th, 2019|Categories: Catholicism, Music|

Editor's Note: Guillaume de Machaut's Messe de Notre Dame (Mass of Our Lady) is the earliest complete setting of the Ordinary of the Mass attributable to a single composer and was written for performance at the great Cathedral of Our Lady of Reims in France. The following description comes from the website of the Boston [...]

Tolkien, Lewis, and the Need for Literary Realism

By |2019-04-06T22:40:38-05:00April 6th, 2019|Categories: Christianity, Fiction, Glenn Arbery, Literature, Senior Contributors, Wisdom, Wyoming Catholic College|

J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis tempt us to escape to a self-evidently numinous world rather than to seek out the texture of wonder in this one. What we need is an unsparing literary realism—literature without recourse to fantasy, literature in which talking trees do not come to the rescue. It’s quiet at Wyoming Catholic [...]

“The Nihilism of the Empty Tomb”

By |2019-04-05T13:13:21-05:00April 5th, 2019|Categories: Christianity, History, Literature, Poetry|

They seek him here; they seek him there. Those Frenchies seek him everywhere. Is he in heaven?—Is he in hell? That damned, elusive Pimpernel!  —The Scarlet Pimpernel, Baroness Orczy “Come now, let us be reasonable men as befits us in this epoch, this age, of enlightenment. If such it be, then why must we continue [...]

American Literature and the Catholic Faith

By |2019-03-30T22:37:17-05:00March 30th, 2019|Categories: Christianity, Joseph Pearce, Literature, Senior Contributors|

It’s difficult to know where to start or finish in any discussion of the connection between American literature and the Catholic Faith. The whole topic is fraught with complexity, as is the relationship between the American nation and the Catholic Faith, or American history and the Catholic Faith. There are few American writers who [...]

Lent and the Divine Life

By |2019-03-28T15:34:35-05:00March 23rd, 2019|Categories: Christian Living, Christianity, Tradition|

Fasting is far more than just an obligation or even a discipline; it is connected with the very mystery of life and death, of salvation and damnation. “Fasting is a medicine.” — St. John Chrysostom “The days will come, when the bridegroom is taken away from them, and then they will fast.” — Matthew [...]