“Good Things Out of Nazareth”: The Letters & Life of Flannery O’Connor

By |2020-07-30T12:22:15-05:00August 2nd, 2020|Categories: Books, Christianity, Flannery O'Connor, Literature, South|

“Good Things Out of Nazareth: The Uncollected Letters of Flannery O’Connor and Friends” is the epistolary record of Flannery O’Connor’s other life, the life lived behind the printed page in small-town Georgia. This life is not nearly as “large and startling” as her fiction, but it is unforgettable all the same. Good Things Out [...]

Just How Catholic Is the Declaration of Independence?

By |2020-07-31T22:24:04-05:00August 1st, 2020|Categories: American Founding, American Republic, Bradley J. Birzer, Catholicism, Christianity, Declaration of Independence, History, Senior Contributors, Thomas Jefferson|

An oft-reprinted editorial, “Did Bellarmine Whisper to Thomas Jefferson?,” suggests that the American statesman might have been influenced by Robert Bellarmine. While recent scholarship has confirmed that Jefferson came to Bellarmine through the works of the radical Protestant intermediary, Algernon Sydney, is the Declaration of Independence really influenced by Catholic teaching? In the wake [...]

Was Beethoven a Believer? The Case of the “Missa Solemnis”

By |2020-08-02T19:21:00-05:00August 1st, 2020|Categories: Audio/Video, Beethoven 250, Catholicism, Ludwig van Beethoven, Music, Religion, Timeless Essays|

Can an unbeliever, a denier of the faith, produce such music as Beethoven did in his Missa Solemnis? It has long been fashionable in music history textbooks to speak of Beethoven’s Missa Solemnis as a purely artistic statement that, to be blunt, uses the texts of the Catholic Mass as a convenient springboard for musical experimentation and [...]

Marianne Moore’s Baseball Poems

By |2020-07-24T14:00:29-05:00July 27th, 2020|Categories: Baseball, Character, Christianity, Culture, History, Literature, Poetry, Sports|

As we attempt to understand Marianne Moore’s baseball poems, it is important to see the contextual influence of her brother and their mutual interest in Pauline Christianity, a tradition they never abandoned. There is some mystery in the space between sport and religion that many Christian athletes inhabit and of which Marianne Moore is [...]

Summer Reading: Good Books for Strange Times

By |2020-08-01T23:44:22-05:00July 25th, 2020|Categories: Books, Christianity, Education, Glenn Arbery, Literature, Senior Contributors, Wyoming Catholic College|

Despite all efforts to cancel good sense, common decency, a real sense of justice, respect for the law, and fear of God, these things will reassert themselves, as will the gifts of faith, hope, and charity. What better summer reading for an age of martyrs than the great works of the Western tradition that [...]

Reflections on George Gershwin’s “Summertime”

By |2020-07-21T15:37:07-05:00July 25th, 2020|Categories: Christian Living, Christianity, Culture, Happiness, Music, Nature|

DuBose Heyward’s timeless lyrics and George Gershwin’s iconic melody in “Summertime” speak wisdom to our era of uncertainty. When we hear this American classic, may we always feel the presence of the Lord, remembering that God’s greatest desire is to be with each one of us in heaven for all eternity. “Summertime,” the classic [...]

“Advent of the Eskaton”

By |2020-07-25T12:10:18-05:00July 25th, 2020|Categories: Christianity, Evil, Imagination, Poetry|

‘You may say this to Théoden son of Thengel: open war lies before him, with Sauron or against him. None may live now as they have lived, and few shall keep what they call their own. —J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings ‘Ware, ‘ware! in the watches of the night; for the devil reigns in darkness [...]

From Wonder to Wisdom: Strengthening Catholic Education

By |2020-07-25T08:36:52-05:00July 25th, 2020|Categories: Andrew Seeley, Catholicism, Christianity, Education, Liberal Learning|

More than 700 Catholic educators from across the country and overseas will gather online next week to explore, celebrate, and strengthen the growing movement to save Catholic schools through the recovery of the Church’s proven tradition of education. The Institute for Catholic Liberal Education’s 8th National Conference was forced to shift to an online [...]

Conserving in A.D. 2020 or 499 B.C.

By |2020-07-21T17:58:07-05:00July 21st, 2020|Categories: Aristotle, Bradley J. Birzer, Cicero, Conservatism, Culture, Edmund Burke, Politics, Russell Kirk, Senior Contributors, Socrates, Thomas More|

In times of chaos, it’s profoundly necessary to remember those who have come before us and the innumerable sacrifices they made. Each of these great men, whatever his individual faults, sought to live according to the Good, the True, and the Beautiful. They preserved, and they conserved. As a way of perceiving and a [...]

Beyond Good and Nietzsche

By |2020-07-18T15:44:41-05:00July 18th, 2020|Categories: Christianity, Dwight Longenecker, Friedrich Nietzsche, Great Books, Morality, Senior Contributors|

What Nietzsche calls Christianity is, in fact, a twisted form of the Judeo-Christian faith. Of course, there are people who use humility as their trump card, their piety to blackmail others, their meekness to manipulate, and their obedience to secretly dominate. Perhaps this is all the Christianity young Nietzsche saw in his Protestant pastor [...]

Going Over Jordan: Images of Baptism in “1917”

By |2020-07-18T17:49:07-05:00July 18th, 2020|Categories: Christianity, Culture, Film, Literature, Poetry, War, World War I|

Sam Mendes’ appropriation of baptismal imagery allows the film “1917” to achieve the rare feat of portraying the First World War in terms of hope and rebirth rather than merely of pity and death. As we watch the protagonist Schofield’s journey, we recall that we have been buried and raised with Christ. I was [...]

Is Christianity in America Subservient to Capitalism?

By |2020-07-16T20:13:27-05:00July 16th, 2020|Categories: Capitalism, Charity, Christianity, Economics, George Stanciu, Labor/Work, Modernity, Senior Contributors|

The silence from the pulpit about the low-wage workers, 44% of the population, is disgraceful, although understandable, because Christianity in America has rarely challenged the ethos of capitalism. As a result, churches have virtually no role in political or economic life. The COVID-19 Pandemic has revealed that we no longer have the equivalent of [...]

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