What I Learned From Solving a 750-Piece Puzzle

By |2020-12-04T15:43:53-06:00December 4th, 2020|Categories: Christianity, Wisdom|

During Christmas break, I discovered, to my great surprise, that putting together a 750-piece puzzle can be addicting. Throughout the process, I found that solving puzzles can teach us a lot about ourselves and about life and made five meaningful connections. This past Christmas, a parishioner of ours gave my kids a puzzle, a [...]

Surprised by Jack

By |2020-11-28T21:35:13-06:00November 28th, 2020|Categories: Books, Bradley J. Birzer, C.S. Lewis, Character, Christianity, Literature, Senior Contributors, Timeless Essays|

C.S. Lewis’ writings are endlessly fascinating because the man himself was endlessly fascinating—to himself as well as to others. He saw life as a sort of drama and art, one in which the will shapes what Providence has so generously provided. One can readily and happily delve into C.S. Lewis’s autobiography of 1955, Surprised [...]

Puddleglum, Jeremy Bentham, & the Grand Inquisitor

By |2020-11-28T06:58:11-06:00November 28th, 2020|Categories: C.S. Lewis, Dwight Longenecker, Freedom, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Happiness, Philosophy, Politics, Senior Contributors|

The aim and ambition of Jeremy Bentham was that everyone would be happy. But how is it possible for everyone to be happy? The Grand Inquisitor gives the answer: by yielding their freedom and submitting to their overlords. This is the dysfunctional and distorted psychology behind the entitlement culture and the welfare state. When [...]

Approaching Thanks

By |2020-11-25T17:44:01-06:00November 25th, 2020|Categories: Glenn Arbery, Great Books, Plato, Senior Contributors, Wyoming Catholic College|

The word for truth in Greek means the absence of forgetting—the sudden recollection, the vivid recovery. In the great tradition of the West, when those who study it retrieve immense and priceless knowledge from forgetfulness, we find the hope of renewal. As we approach Thanksgiving this year, the coronavirus phenomenon helps us value rightly [...]

C.S. Lewis, Langston Hughes, & the Haunting of America

By |2020-11-23T12:44:43-06:00November 22nd, 2020|Categories: American Republic, C.S. Lewis, Literature, Myth, Poetry|

All nations need reminders that even their best ideals, though worth defending, do not earn them chosen nation status. Reading C.S. Lewis’ “That Hideous Strength” and Langston Hughes’ “Let America Be America Again” in light of each other could rouse those in need of both a restoration of confidence in the goodness of the [...]

“Saint Cecilia Mass”

By |2020-11-21T20:00:58-06:00November 21st, 2020|Categories: Audio/Video, Catholicism, Music|

St. Cecilia Mass is the common name of a solemn mass in G major by Charles Gounod, composed in 1855 and scored for three soloists, mixed choir, orchestra and organ. The official name is Messe solennelle en l’honneur de Sainte-Cécile, in homage of St. Cecilia, the patron saint of music. The work was assigned CG 56 in the [...]

Prayer, Beauty, and Civilization

By |2020-11-21T10:16:29-06:00November 21st, 2020|Categories: Art, Beauty, Books, Christianity, Civilization, Culture, Imagination, Michael De Sapio, Senior Contributors|

In our zeal to articulate how Christianity has shaped civilization, we are apt to neglect the specific role of prayer. The good, the true, and the beautiful fostered by our civilization have been initiated and sustained by prayer. If one does not pray, what measure of human cultivation is one missing? Art and Prayer: [...]

The Southern (Catholic) Tradition

By |2020-11-21T16:31:24-06:00November 21st, 2020|Categories: American Republic, Catholicism, Christianity, History, South|

Part of the South’s charm is an ability to recognize the good, true, and beautiful in traditions other than its principally Protestant identity and heritage. And Kevin Starr’s excellent history reveals that American Catholic identity is deeply Southern. Continental Achievement: Roman Catholics in the United States, by Kevin Starr (330 pages, Ignatius Press, 2020) [...]

Signing of the Mayflower Compact

By |2020-11-20T15:38:01-06:00November 20th, 2020|Categories: American Republic, Christianity, Civilization, Government, History, Mayflower Compact|

In the name of God, amen. We whose names are under written… [h]aving undertaken for the Glory of God, and advancement of the christian [sic] faith, and the honour of our King and country, a voyage to plant the first colony in the northern parts of Virginia; do by these presents solemnly and mutually, [...]

“Othello” in a Nutshell

By |2020-11-17T11:07:35-06:00November 16th, 2020|Categories: Catholicism, Christianity, Great Books, Joseph Pearce, Senior Contributors, William Shakespeare|

In his tragedy “Othello,” Shakespeare censures the age in which King James I renewed the persecution of Catholics in England, with a tale of darkness, told with the doom-laden and crushing weight of the playwright’s own heavy heart. Othello is the first of a triumvirate of tragedies written by Shakespeare during a particularly dark [...]

Flaubert’s Fictional Faith

By |2020-11-14T09:49:27-06:00November 14th, 2020|Categories: Beauty, Catholicism, Christianity, Faith, Fiction, Literature|

Although Gustave Flaubert professed to be a mystic who believed in nothing, in “A Simple Heart,” he gives us an unironic portrait of guileless faith that melds the hagiographer’s preoccupation with sanctity with the modern fictionist’s oblique incorporation of symbols. In so doing, the professed atheist purifies the cynical soul. Since doubt was carried [...]

Veterans Day

By |2020-11-10T15:18:07-06:00November 10th, 2020|Categories: American Republic, Glenn Arbery, Patriotism, Senior Contributors, Wyoming Catholic College|

For most of our veterans, it should go without saying that military discipline and experience give them a moral authority. It is a recognition—once universal—that is too often forgotten in an age when patriotism itself seems suspect to many. On this day when we honor our veterans, it’s good to recollect both the debt [...]

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