10 Ancient Books That Influenced Stoicism

By |2021-05-05T16:38:16-05:00May 5th, 2021|Categories: Books, Bradley J. Birzer, Philosophy, Senior Contributors, Stoicism|

“A book is a word spoken into creation. Its message goes out into the world. It cannot be taken back,” Michael O’Brien warned as well as assured in his magisterial novel, Sophia House. Just as each word is a reflection of The Word (Logos), so each book is a reflection of The Book. While Christians [...]

Was the Postwar U.S. International Order Truly Liberal?

By |2021-04-26T19:52:25-05:00April 25th, 2021|Categories: American Republic, Books, Foreign Affairs, History, Liberal, Politics, World War II|

“The False Promise of Liberal Order” and “Tomorrow, the World” provide a useful two-dose vaccine against the now-viral view that something ambitious must be done to repair and revitalize the fraying liberal international order. Both books counsel against doubling down on a postwar order that was more imperial than liberal. The False Promise of Liberal [...]

An Ode to Great Books and a Beautiful Library

By |2021-04-24T17:30:14-05:00April 24th, 2021|Categories: Books, Essential, Featured, Libraries, Timeless Essays, W. Winston Elliott III, Will Durant, Wisdom|

“If I were rich I would have many books, and I would pamper myself with bindings bright to the eye and soft to the touch, in paper generously opaque, and type such as men designed when printing was very young. I would dress my gods in leather and gold, and burn candles of worship before [...]

10 C.S. Lewis Books Every Imaginative Conservative Should Read

By |2021-04-19T16:19:36-05:00April 19th, 2021|Categories: Books, Bradley J. Birzer, C.S. Lewis, Christian Humanism, Imaginative Conservative Books, Senior Contributors|

Few would dispute the claim that C.S. Lewis was the last century’s greatest Christian apologist, rivaled only by G.K. Chesterton and Pope John Paul II. While all three wrote voluminously, Lewis’s books had the broadest appeal. Even atheists read Lewis’s Christian books, if only for the art of them. Surely, we can do better than [...]

A Worthy Chase: Pursuing an Ideal Education

By |2021-04-22T09:39:55-05:00April 18th, 2021|Categories: Books, Classical Learning, Education, Eva Brann, Liberal Learning, St. John's College|

Eva Brann’s latest book, “Pursuits of Happiness,” is a collection of essays which range from Aeschylus to Austen, with topics spanning the nature of time itself to Sacred Scripture. Interspersed here are two parts constituting the whole of an ideal education. Pursuits of Happiness: On Being Interested by Eva Brann (640 pages, Paul Dry Books, [...]

Ideological Neo-Colonialism In The 21st Century

By |2021-04-22T10:02:48-05:00April 15th, 2021|Categories: Books, Civilization, David Deavel, Politics, Senior Contributors, Sexuality|

Obianuju Ekeocha’s “Target Africa” exposes the imposition of destructive, elite American values on Africans by our government, our educational institutions, and our foundations. These “neo-colonialists” treat Africans as children by handing down to them decisions about how to live—decisions that have failed spectacularly in the Western world itself. Target Africa: Ideological Neo-Colonialism In The Twenty-First [...]

10 Books Every Imaginative Conservative Should Read

By |2021-04-22T10:04:02-05:00April 12th, 2021|Categories: Books, Bradley J. Birzer, Imaginative Conservative Books, Senior Contributors, The Imaginative Conservative|

So, you’re attracted to imaginative conservatism, and you’re wondering how such a school of thought came about. The roots, to be sure, are planted firmly in the first half of the twentieth century as a number of diverse thinkers strove to fight populism and progressivism (left and right, gentle and severe) in all their myriad [...]

Abraham Lincoln: A Western Legacy

By |2021-03-31T15:06:30-05:00March 31st, 2021|Categories: Abraham Lincoln, American West, Books|

Throughout his political career, Abraham Lincoln connected the maintenance of freedom with the preservation of the free West. If the American West fell, so would American liberty. Richard W. Etulain’s “Abraham Lincoln: A Western Legacy” seeks to show more explicitly Lincoln’s relationship with the West. Abraham Lincoln: A Western Legacy by Richard W. Etulain (198 [...]

A Mother’s Tale: Hilda van Stockum’s “The Winged Watchman”

By |2021-03-25T12:03:45-05:00March 26th, 2021|Categories: Books, Catholicism, David Deavel, Fiction, Senior Contributors, World War II|

The sharp focus on Mrs. Verhagen gives “The Winged Watchman,” Hilda van Stockum’s novel about a Dutch family during World War II, such power. The close-up tasks of the women are just as heroic as the tasks of the men who often fought to protect their loved ones. Who knew a great war story would [...]

Bureaucracy of, by, and for the Smug

By |2021-03-22T14:33:27-05:00March 21st, 2021|Categories: Books, Bruce Frohnen, Rule of Law, Senior Contributors|

If anything saves our constitutional republic at this stage it will be Americans’ sheer unruliness, our unwillingness to sit still and be told what to do by people convinced that their scores on entrance exams (or, perhaps, on the squash court) entitle them to organize our lives for us. Law & Leviathan: Redeeming the Administrative [...]

Books & Those Who Read Them Are the Real Endangered Species

By |2021-03-17T14:14:19-05:00March 17th, 2021|Categories: Books, Literature, Modernity|

Reading books forces us to concentrate for longer periods of time than we do while sprinting from site to site online. Certain books demand the employment of certain analytical skills and close reading. But in our age of jittery distraction are readers becoming “an endangered species?” In the February 2021 issue of Chronicles: A Magazine [...]

“The Madness of Crowds”: How Identity Politics Has Replaced Religion

By |2021-03-09T14:26:15-06:00March 11th, 2021|Categories: Books, Ideology, Liberalism, Politics, Sexuality|

Into the breach—or onto the deserted ground—has marched a new metaphysics in the form of a new religion. In “The Madness of Crowds,” Douglas Murray explains this “religion” of identity politics. The Madness of Crowds: Gender, Race and Identity, by Douglas Murray (304 pages, Bloomsbury Continuum, 2021) A better title for this book might have [...]

Is “Christian Humanism” Gone Forever?

By |2021-02-11T13:00:07-06:00February 11th, 2021|Categories: Books, Bradley J. Birzer, C.S. Lewis, Christian Humanism, Senior Contributors, T.S. Eliot|

In his book “The Year of Our Lord 1943,” writing on Christian humanism, Alan Jacobs considers the fears and desires of five major but seemingly disparate figures in 1943 as they envision a post-war world after an allied victory: W.H. Auden, T.S. Eliot, C.S. Lewis, Jacques Maritain, and Simone Weil. The Year of Our Lord [...]

Bernard Bailyn at Last: Illuminating History

By |2021-02-10T10:52:58-06:00February 10th, 2021|Categories: Books, History|

Bernard Bailyn challenges card-carrying historians and interested citizens alike to embrace intellectual humility and amiability at a time when public discourse has taken a decisive turn away from such virtues. This challenge is evident in Bailyn’s final work, “Illuminating History.” Bernard Bailyn The American historian Bernard Bailyn, who died of heart failure at [...]

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