Christopher Caldwell’s “The Age of Entitlement”

By |2020-04-01T12:00:04-05:00April 1st, 2020|Categories: American Republic, Books, History, Modernity, Politics, Presidency|

Are we a less free people, maybe even a far less free people, than we were in 1963? Partial punch-puller that he is content to be, Christopher Caldwell is not about to offer either a tentative or final answer to such questions. But the evidence that he presents strongly suggests that we are certainly [...]

Old Rowan Oak: William Faulkner’s Conservatism

By |2020-03-31T17:15:52-05:00March 31st, 2020|Categories: Books, Conservatism, Literature, South|

Russell Kirk’s Ten Conservative Principles reflect the way William Faulkner wrote, acted, and organized his life. As a property owner with notions of limited government, he brought that orientation to his fiction, to his work in Hollywood, to his commentary on civil rights, and to his everyday relationships with his family and community. His [...]

Building American Institutions During a Cultural Crisis

By |2020-03-29T18:36:22-05:00March 29th, 2020|Categories: Books, Civil Society, Conservatism, Culture War, Social Institutions|

In his latest book, Yuval Levin presents irrefutable evidence of America’s weakening attachment to its core institutions of family, community, voluntary associations, religions, and political parties. His goal, however, is to move beyond today’s ideological culture war and show how commitment to institutions puts us on an edifying path to belonging, social status, personal [...]

David Weimer’s “The City as Metaphor”

By |2020-03-26T10:56:58-05:00March 27th, 2020|Categories: Books, Christine Norvell, Fiction, Imagination, Literature, Senior Contributors|

David Weimer’s “The City as Metaphor” traces the concept of the city through a century of American fiction, to find that its depiction has a trend. Where once the city was a symbol of hope, a place to seek one’s fortune, where expectant immigrants and starry-eyed farmboys sought success, all has changed. The City [...]

Our Hero: Socrates in the Underworld

By |2020-03-23T23:43:39-05:00March 24th, 2020|Categories: Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Books, Peter A. Lawler, Senior Contributors, Socrates, Timeless Essays, Truth|

Socrates in the Underworld: On Plato’s Gorgias, by Nalin Ranasinghe (192 pages, St. Augustine Press, 2009) Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords readers the opportunity to join Peter Augustine Lawler as he reflects on how Socrates models both rightly-ordered eros and logos, in contrast to the Stoics and Sophists. —W. Winston Elliott III, [...]

Four Hours of Fury: The Story of World War II’s Operation Varsity

By |2020-03-24T09:41:36-05:00March 23rd, 2020|Categories: Books, World War II|

The Rhine River was the line of no return—once the paratroopers of the 17th Airborne crossed it, they’d be over enemy territory. Some pretended to sleep while others smoked or just stared into space. No one spoke. The roar of the engines and the rattling of the airframe made conversation impossible, which was just fine. [...]

Three Reasons Why Internet Detox Books Leave Us Frustrated

By |2020-03-22T17:38:40-05:00March 22nd, 2020|Categories: Books, Culture, Modernity, Technology|

To the Christian struggling with the uncontrollable urge to engage in social media and internet searches, books like Nir Eyal’s “Indistractable: How to Control Your Attention and Choose Your Life” might appear to be a godsend. However, such instructions are bound to be frustrating and disappointing to those seeking lasting spiritual progress. Technology’s invasion [...]

For Thine is the Kingdom: Tom Holland’s “Dominion”

By |2020-03-07T16:53:58-06:00March 7th, 2020|Categories: Books, Christendom, Christianity, Civilization, Culture, Dwight Longenecker, History, Religion, Senior Contributors, Western Civilization|

Like a queen who rides a bicycle, Tom Holland’s “Dominion” is both majestic and down-to-earth. From antiquity to modernity, Mr. Holland traces a sneaky thesis that Christianity has changed the world—transforming it from the inside out. Dominion: How the Christian Revolution Remade the World, by Tom Holland (624 pages, Basic Books, 2019) Every once [...]

Big Wonderful Thing: A History of Texas

By |2020-03-05T15:37:04-06:00March 5th, 2020|Categories: Books, History, Imagination|

In “Big Wonderful Thing: A Texas History,” Stephen Harrigan explores the “poignantly unguarded self-love” and the “fierce national personality” that oozes from Texans. He is unapologetic in his praise for and fascination with the state. “Big Wonderful Thing,” however, is not a tribute piece; instead, Mr. Harrigan’s history carefully holds in tension the grandeur [...]

Bradley Birzer’s “Beyond Tenebrae”

By |2020-03-02T10:33:54-06:00March 2nd, 2020|Categories: Books, Bradley J. Birzer, Christian Humanism, Christianity, Culture|

Despite the secularist’s attempts to lay claim to the word “humanism,” there’s nothing intrinsically secular about it. Using “humanism” as if it were in opposition to “theism” is to create a false dichotomy. Bradley Birzer’s “Beyond Tenebrae” serves to clearly illustrate that good theists can be good humanists—and are sometimes the best. Beyond Tenebrae: [...]

Amity Shlaes on the Failure of The Great Society

By |2020-02-27T09:37:19-06:00February 27th, 2020|Categories: Books, Conservatism, Economics, Government, History, Politics, Ronald Reagan|

During LBJ’s presidency, a war was waged, as Amity Shlaes demonstrates in “Great Society,” by the federal government against the rest of the nation. Relief might have been expected from Richard Nixon, but Nixon’s true intent was symbolized when he placed a portrait of Woodrow Wilson in the Cabinet Room. This tragic story of [...]

Aristotle’s Revenge

By |2020-02-18T15:32:23-06:00February 18th, 2020|Categories: Aristotle, Books, Imagination, Philosophy, Truth|

Insights into the nature of Aristotle’s philosophy confirm Edward Feser’s detailed argument that Aristotle, under the gentle care of later scholastically-minded thinkers, turns out to be right about more things than most of us dare hope. Aristotle’s Revenge: The Metaphysical Foundations of Physical and Biological Science, by Edward Feser (Editiones Scholasticae, 515 pages, 2019) [...]