The Demolition of the Western Mind

By |2020-09-12T11:55:30-05:00September 10th, 2020|Categories: Books, Catholicism, Sexuality|

Our only hope to counter our freefall into nihilism and relativism is a return to reality—not the false reality of the materialists, but the true reality of those who worship the Word. The only way to become real, as Anthony Esolen says in “Sex and the Unreal City,” is to join ourselves “to Christ, [...]

The Untold Story of Japan’s Atomic Bomb

By |2020-09-02T23:51:17-05:00September 2nd, 2020|Categories: Books, World War II|

Had the Japanese succeeded in their last-ditch atomic effort, the world’s history might have been very different. By August 1945, Japan had abandoned the idea of bombing mainland America. Instead, Japanese leaders were planning to use what atomic weapons they could produce on the Allied invasion fleet that they believed would soon be off its [...]

“The Cross and the Lynching Tree”: Race and Religion

By |2020-08-29T10:56:38-05:00August 29th, 2020|Categories: Books, Christianity, Culture, Dwight Longenecker, Equality, Religion, Senior Contributors|

James Cone’s “The Cross and the Lynching Tree” is a passionate and excellent contribution to the discussion of race and religion from the perspective of African-American believers and should help white Christians to see the world from the viewpoint of their black brothers and sisters. The Cross and the Lynching Tree, by James Cone [...]

The Reed of God

By |2020-08-29T18:33:06-05:00August 29th, 2020|Categories: Books, Catholicism|

To be filled with God’s presence, one must be empty. The requisite emptiness, however, is not formless, but like the virginal emptiness of Our Lady: “It is emptiness like the hollow of a reed, the narrow riftless emptiness, which can have only one destiny: to receive the piper’s breath and to utter the song that [...]

Demystifying the Louvre

By |2020-08-26T16:37:23-05:00August 26th, 2020|Categories: Architecture, Art, Books, Culture, History, Western Civilization|

In recounting the growth of one of the West’s grandest cultural achievements, James Gardner is an admirably conservative guide to the impressive qualities of the Louvre. Today when Western civilization is under attack as never before, it is a paradox that the encyclopedic art museum, one of the characteristic achievements of this civilization, is [...]

Between the Seen and Unseen

By |2020-08-20T11:24:21-05:00August 22nd, 2020|Categories: Books, Christianity, Heaven, Philosophy, Science|

Heaven is an unreality for contemporary physicalists of all schools of thought who preach that matter is the only reality and that everything in the world can be explained solely in materialist terms. Yet for those who are open to the sacramental dimension of our diurnal existence, heaven is here, there, and everywhere. Paradise [...]

The Forgotten “Freddy the Pig”

By |2020-08-07T16:07:51-05:00August 7th, 2020|Categories: Books, Humor, Imagination, Literature|

Even though Walter R. Brooks’ “Freddy the Pig” series doesn’t aim to teach a moral story, deliver great epiphanies, or grapple directly with universal human themes, the books are refreshingly unself-conscious and yet still make a considerable contribution to American literature in the same way the works of P.G. Wodehouse have done for English [...]

The Foundering of the American Republic

By |2020-08-06T08:07:27-05:00August 6th, 2020|Categories: American Founding, American Republic, Books, Christianity, Declaration of Independence, Modernity, Politics|

So, if Robert R. Reilly is correct in his analysis and assessment of the American Founding in his book “America on Trial,” where did the American experiment in ordered liberty go wrong? I would suggest that the problem is neither progressivism nor its philosophical antecedent historicism, baleful as they both might be. Rather, it [...]

“Good Things Out of Nazareth”: The Letters & Life of Flannery O’Connor

By |2020-07-30T12:22:15-05:00August 2nd, 2020|Categories: Books, Christianity, Flannery O'Connor, Literature, South|

“Good Things Out of Nazareth: The Uncollected Letters of Flannery O’Connor and Friends” is the epistolary record of Flannery O’Connor’s other life, the life lived behind the printed page in small-town Georgia. This life is not nearly as “large and startling” as her fiction, but it is unforgettable all the same. Good Things Out [...]

An Oaf’s Magnificat: On Kingsley Amis and “Lucky Jim”

By |2020-07-29T17:17:10-05:00July 30th, 2020|Categories: Books, Education, Fiction, Humor, Literature, Satire|

In 1954, “Lucky Jim” was a new planet: When Kingsley Amis wrote it, English satirical fiction had been for a third of a century a decidedly mandarin and highbrow business. Unlike his predecessors, Amis depicts representatives of the lower orders and the previously inaccessible university world that is not so much a garden of [...]

Is Natural Law Sufficient to Defend the Founding?

By |2020-07-26T00:55:31-05:00July 26th, 2020|Categories: American Founding, American Republic, Aristotle, Books, Natural Law, Philosophy, Reason|

As Robert R. Reilly explains in “America on Trial,” the United States restored the founding of government based on reason in a Constitution that produced the most successful government experiment in history. If the American Founding was a rational and social success, why has the American experiment now come under modern attack? America on [...]

Summer Reading: Good Books for Strange Times

By |2020-08-01T23:44:22-05:00July 25th, 2020|Categories: Books, Christianity, Education, Glenn Arbery, Literature, Senior Contributors, Wyoming Catholic College|

Despite all efforts to cancel good sense, common decency, a real sense of justice, respect for the law, and fear of God, these things will reassert themselves, as will the gifts of faith, hope, and charity. What better summer reading for an age of martyrs than the great works of the Western tradition that [...]

Ernst Jünger’s “The Forest Passage” and the Conservative Mind

By |2020-07-20T13:42:50-05:00July 21st, 2020|Categories: Books, Conservatism, Freedom, Imagination, Literature, Myth, Nature|

Written in the shadow of the Second World War, Ernst Jünger’s “The Forest Passage” reimagines the forest as a symbol of freedom in an age where the “Leviathan,” or all-encompassing totalitarian state, threatens to encroach on liberty and free space. Yet as long as the “forest rebel” has access to the domains of art, [...]

“I’ll Take My Stand” as Southern Epic

By |2020-07-17T17:55:43-05:00July 17th, 2020|Categories: Agrarianism, Books, South|

Ever since the first stir they created in the early 1930s the Southern Agrarians have been difficult to assess. How serious, politically and economically, were they in what they advocated? How much agreement was there among them? The four collected above papers point up and even accentuate their divergence, investigating wide-ranging and, at least [...]

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