Living at This Hour

By |2021-01-22T09:54:37-06:00January 22nd, 2021|Categories: Glenn Arbery, Government, John Milton, Literature, Poetry, Senior Contributors, Wyoming Catholic College|

Even without the content of the general historical frame, William Wordsworth’s sonnet, “London 1802,” is moving to every generation that reads it, and it is natural to compare our current political situation with the one described in the poem. All of us, of course, remember the dire circumstances of England in 1802. No? Then [...]

Four Roads to Rome

By |2021-01-21T15:11:41-06:00January 21st, 2021|Categories: Books, Catholicism, Flannery O'Connor, Literature|

In “The Life You Save May Be Your Own,” Paul Elie weaves together the historically parallel stories of Dorothy Day, Thomas Merton, Walker Percy, and Flannery O’Connor. Truly these were four of the last century’s most remarkable Catholic writers. The Life You Save May Be Your Own: An American Pilgrimage, by Paul Elie (554 [...]

Furies: The Myopia of the Present Moment

By |2021-01-15T16:52:37-06:00January 15th, 2021|Categories: Civilization, Classics, Glenn Arbery, Great Books, Senior Contributors, Wyoming Catholic College|

Turning away from the news and attending with imagination to the “Oresteia” takes faith, both in God and in the wisdom of our forebears. This will be a worthier endeavor, both for the present moment and for the time to come, than trying to tear down the very structures that give us the promise [...]

Modernity, Art, and Liturgy

By |2021-01-02T17:00:22-06:00January 2nd, 2021|Categories: Catholicism, Christianity, Senior Contributors|

One of the useful things Stephen Schloesser's "Jazz Age Catholicism" does us is to remind us that the church and the world are not hermetically sealed off from one other; things that happen in the church are very often related to what is happening in the world. Jazz Age Catholicism: Mystic Modernism in Postwar Paris, [...]

Jew and Greek

By |2020-12-25T18:28:06-06:00December 23rd, 2020|Categories: Christianity, Christmas, Glenn Arbery, Great Books, Iliad, Odyssey, Senior Contributors, Wyoming Catholic College|

Against the backdrop of angels and gods, Jew and Greek, comes the humble birth in Bethlehem. This most momentous intervention is God’s incarnation. God is the newborn mortal child wholly dependent on others to shelter and nourish him. He is also, at the same time, the ageless and immortal God on Whom all creation [...]

Climbing the Mountain of Education With John Henry Newman

By |2020-12-16T20:36:14-06:00December 16th, 2020|Categories: David Deavel, Education, Liberal Learning, Senior Contributors, St. John Henry Newman|

As St. John Henry Newman explains in his book “The Idea of a University,” education is the process by which a mind is formed not just to learn facts and ideas but to be able to think about how they are connected. And when Newman gives an image for that process, he points toward [...]

A Friend and Faithful Servant of C.S. Lewis: Memories of Walter Hooper

By |2020-12-11T14:28:00-06:00December 14th, 2020|Categories: C.S. Lewis, Catholicism, Christian Humanism, Joseph Pearce, Senior Contributors|

Having passed away recently, Lewis scholar Walter Hooper will be missed, but we can well believe that he is now once more with C.S. Lewis, whom he had served most faithfully for so many years, in a place in which it is never winter but always Christmas. With the passing of Walter Hooper on [...]

Advent in Uncertain Times

By |2020-12-11T13:27:21-06:00December 12th, 2020|Categories: Advent, Christianity, Christmas, Glenn Arbery, Senior Contributors, Wyoming Catholic College|

In these uncertain times, we are constantly being urged to historicize Christ, as though He were merely a symbolic figure in a moribund and culturally discredited system of thought. But Advent reminds us of the deep promise of the Nicene Creed. He was, He is, and He is to come. In this Advent, we [...]

Sitting Bull and the Wrath of Achilles

By |2020-12-04T11:30:40-06:00December 6th, 2020|Categories: American West, Glenn Arbery, History, Senior Contributors, War, Wyoming Catholic College|

The story of the Indian Wars for the American West in Peter Cozzens’s “The Earth Is Weeping” contains the tragic patterns of all human history. This history, like all real history, lives once we awaken memory and see the real contours of what lies before us. One of the compensations for long hours in [...]

Lessons from Flannery O’Connor

By |2020-12-03T16:25:35-06:00December 5th, 2020|Categories: Catholicism, Christianity, Flannery O'Connor, Literature|

Even if Flannery O’Connor’s stories are shocking, something mysterious lies beneath the violence and absurdity: the manifestation of moments of grace. Observing these moments in O’Connor’s stories can help us recognize other moments of grace in our own time and place. We can look beyond the grotesque and recognize God’s grace shining forth from [...]

Approaching Thanks

By |2020-12-21T13:40:31-06:00November 25th, 2020|Categories: Glenn Arbery, Great Books, Plato, Senior Contributors, Thanksgiving, Wyoming Catholic College|

The word for truth in Greek means the absence of forgetting—the sudden recollection, the vivid recovery. In the great tradition of the West, when those who study it retrieve immense and priceless knowledge from forgetfulness, we find the hope of renewal. As we approach Thanksgiving this year, the coronavirus phenomenon helps us value rightly [...]

“Saint Cecilia Mass”

By |2020-11-21T20:00:58-06:00November 21st, 2020|Categories: Audio/Video, Catholicism, Music|

St. Cecilia Mass is the common name of a solemn mass in G major by Charles Gounod, composed in 1855 and scored for three soloists, mixed choir, orchestra and organ. The official name is Messe solennelle en l’honneur de Sainte-Cécile, in homage of St. Cecilia, the patron saint of music. The work was assigned CG 56 in the [...]

The Southern (Catholic) Tradition

By |2020-11-21T16:31:24-06:00November 21st, 2020|Categories: American Republic, Catholicism, Christianity, History, South|

Part of the South’s charm is an ability to recognize the good, true, and beautiful in traditions other than its principally Protestant identity and heritage. And Kevin Starr’s excellent history reveals that American Catholic identity is deeply Southern. Continental Achievement: Roman Catholics in the United States, by Kevin Starr (330 pages, Ignatius Press, 2020) [...]

“Othello” in a Nutshell

By |2020-11-17T11:07:35-06:00November 16th, 2020|Categories: Catholicism, Christianity, Great Books, Joseph Pearce, Senior Contributors, William Shakespeare|

In his tragedy “Othello,” Shakespeare censures the age in which King James I renewed the persecution of Catholics in England, with a tale of darkness, told with the doom-laden and crushing weight of the playwright’s own heavy heart. Othello is the first of a triumvirate of tragedies written by Shakespeare during a particularly dark [...]

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