From Highest Heaven Handed Down

By |2020-09-28T16:33:34-05:00September 28th, 2020|Categories: Books, Christianity, Natural Law, Philosophy, St. Thomas Aquinas|

Russell Hittinger’s “The First Grace” deals mightily with the crisis of our time—namely, the failure of those who make, enjoy, and judge the constitutionality of laws to appreciate the dire consequences of denying the place of natural-law considerations in the ordering of public life. The First Grace: Rediscovering the Natural Law in a Post-Christian [...]

Catholic Claims and the Witness of Fr. Mankowski

By |2020-09-26T13:54:42-05:00September 26th, 2020|Categories: Catholicism, Christianity, David Deavel, Senior Contributors|

For those of us who believe in the claims of the Catholic Church but are disheartened by her sinking into chaos and corruption, what are we to do? Perhaps the beginning of an answer might be found in Flannery O’Connor’s evergreen observation that we do not so often suffer for the Church as from [...]

Core Exercises and the Coming Election

By |2020-09-22T11:16:18-05:00September 21st, 2020|Categories: Civil Society, Glenn Arbery, Wyoming Catholic College|

Does our modern body politic, like the human body, have a core? Obviously not. In fact, it seems fair to say that no one, culturally speaking, feels anything but disorientation and dislocation in this world of COVID and radical political division. Indeed, this election season rouses more dread of coming unrest, regardless of who wins, [...]

Habit and Grace

By |2020-09-19T11:00:48-05:00September 19th, 2020|Categories: Glenn Arbery, Great Books, Homer, Iliad, Senior Contributors, St. Thomas Aquinas, Wyoming Catholic College|

The “Iliad” shows us human nature under extreme duress. Understanding Agamemnon and the consequences of his actions gives us a complex gauge of character. We come to recognize how often in daily life surprises come and how much they reveal that we stand in need of grace. Poor Agamemnon. At the very outset of [...]

The Church in an Age of Revolution

By |2020-09-12T17:52:58-05:00September 12th, 2020|Categories: Catholicism, Christianity, Dwight Longenecker, Senior Contributors, Western Civilization|

Moralistic, therapeutic deism is running on the fumes of authentic red-blooded historic Christianity. When it finally sputters to a halt, what will take its place? The Christian faith in the second half of the twenty-first century will be mystical, mythological, and miraculous, or it will be nothing at all. A graph posted by Stephen [...]

The Demolition of the Western Mind

By |2020-09-12T11:55:30-05:00September 10th, 2020|Categories: Books, Catholicism, Sexuality|

Our only hope to counter our freefall into nihilism and relativism is a return to reality—not the false reality of the materialists, but the true reality of those who worship the Word. The only way to become real, as Anthony Esolen says in “Sex and the Unreal City,” is to join ourselves “to Christ, [...]

Remembering the Normal

By |2020-08-31T15:05:43-05:00August 31st, 2020|Categories: Christianity, Community, Glenn Arbery, Happiness, Nature, Senior Contributors, Wyoming Catholic College|

As this strange summer of a strange year comes to an end, I am reminded of ordinary realities and experiences that now appear in a new light. At our college, classes started back up, and I cannot recall a happier sense of new beginning, partly because this, too, has been defamiliarized. On Sunday of [...]

The Reed of God

By |2020-08-29T18:33:06-05:00August 29th, 2020|Categories: Books, Catholicism|

To be filled with God’s presence, one must be empty. The requisite emptiness, however, is not formless, but like the virginal emptiness of Our Lady: “It is emptiness like the hollow of a reed, the narrow riftless emptiness, which can have only one destiny: to receive the piper’s breath and to utter the song that [...]

John Colet, Catholic Humanist

By |2020-08-25T14:26:21-05:00August 28th, 2020|Categories: Catholicism, Christian Humanism, Christianity, Education, History|

John Colet’s life and learning represent Catholic humanism at its finest. He advocated for such reforms in education as the soundest minds of his day also desired. He knew the value of learning and—unlike more than a few intellectuals—he knew also the limits of its advantages. To play about carelessly with the words “humanist” [...]

Aquinas and the Theology of Grace in Michelangelo’s “The Last Judgement”

By |2020-08-20T14:02:34-05:00August 22nd, 2020|Categories: Art, Christianity, Culture, Heaven, St. Thomas Aquinas, Theology|

Portraying the souls of the faithful and those of the damned, “The Last Judgement” of Michelangelo serves as a powerful reminder of the theology of grace and of the importance of one’s own volition in accepting and actively cooperating with the grace which God so freely gives to men. The Last Judgement [...]

Science and the Beauty of Being

By |2020-08-18T14:28:37-05:00August 19th, 2020|Categories: Beauty, Glenn Arbery, Nature, Science, Senior Contributors, Wyoming Catholic College|

Omissions of formal and final causes in the modern scientific project lead to a sense of meaninglessness. Bringing them back allows a crucial reinterpretation of the evidence of modern science: that matter carries within it its own divine purposiveness, and it moves by its nature into greater and greater complexities of order and beauty. [...]

Augustine’s “City of God”: The First Culture War

By |2020-08-15T17:14:32-05:00August 15th, 2020|Categories: Christianity, Civil Society, Culture War, Love, Paul Krause, Rome, Senior Contributors, St. Augustine|

In “The City of God,” Augustine systematically lays bare the empty ideology of the city of man and the Roman empire in a breathtaking counter-narrative that remains remarkably modern and relevant for today. In contrast to the city of man, the City of Love, Augustine argues, is the godly city to which Christians belong [...]

Words, Signs, and Reality

By |2020-08-13T15:57:27-05:00August 13th, 2020|Categories: Christianity, Christine Norvell, Language, Senior Contributors, St. Augustine, Truth|

Frequently in public forums, people forget Augustine’s simple truth: Words fail or succeed based on what truth or reality they represent to their audience. Augustine would ask us to further the “mutual intercourse of men” and remember that words serve us by their remembrance, their representation, and their reality. As a literature teacher, I [...]

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