Nothing But Glory Gained: Pickett’s Charge at Gettysburg

By |2020-06-30T19:10:31-05:00July 2nd, 2020|Categories: Civil War, History, Robert Cheeks, Robert E. Lee, South|

On that summer-hot afternoon at Gettysburg, after two days of fighting in the summer-lush Pennsylvania countryside, the fate of two nations still hung in the balance. General Robert E. Lee intended to tip the scales. Just before 3 o’clock on the morning of July 3, 1863, Robert E. Lee rose by starlight, ate a [...]

“Stand Watie”

By |2020-06-23T17:32:54-05:00June 23rd, 2020|Categories: Audio/Video, Civil War, Music|

Stand Watie (Cherokee: ᏕᎦᏔᎦ, romanized: Degataga, lit. 'Stand firm') (December 12, 1806 – September 9, 1871), also known as Standhope Uwatie, Tawkertawker, and Isaac S. Watie, was a leader of the Cherokee Nation. They allied with the Confederacy, and he was the only Native American to attain a general's rank in the Civil War, Confederacy [...]

“Their Finest Hour”: The Legendary Speech

By |2020-06-17T16:22:46-05:00June 17th, 2020|Categories: History, War, Winston Churchill, World War II|

On June 18, 1940, two days after France had sought an armistice with Germany, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill addressed the House of Commons about the calamitous turn of events in Europe. Britain now stood alone against Adolf Hitler’s military machine, and in this speech, Churchill bolsters his countrymen’s courage to fight for freedom [...]

Remarks at the West Point Graduation Ceremony

By |2020-06-16T13:45:02-05:00June 16th, 2020|Categories: Donald Trump, Military, Presidency|

The Army exists to preserve the republic and the strong foundations upon which it stands: family, God, country, liberty, and justice. What has historically made America unique is the durability of its institutions against the passions and prejudices of the moment. When times are turbulent, what matters most is that which is permanent, timeless, enduring, [...]

Cancelling America’s Founders

By |2020-06-16T06:27:22-05:00June 16th, 2020|Categories: Civil Society, Pat Buchanan, Robert E. Lee, Western Civilization|

George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, and Robert E. Lee were among the decisive figures of American history. If all are dishonored, with their statues pulled down and their names taken off cities, counties, towns, rivers, canals, bridges, buildings, highways, roads, streets and dams, then what is left? "Can we all just get along?" That was the [...]

In Defense of Those Who Protect Us

By |2020-06-08T00:31:36-05:00June 8th, 2020|Categories: Conservatism, J.R.R. Tolkien, Louis Markos, Memorial Day, Military, Timeless Essays, Veterans Day, Virtue, War|

We must respect the difficulty and danger of the jobs of those who protect us and stop willfully blinding ourselves to the unpleasant realities around us. Let us defend, support, and celebrate our police and our military; without them, our world would be a far more perilous place. This semester, I am happily exercising [...]

“These Are the Boys of Pointe Du Hoc”: D-Day Speech

By |2020-06-05T22:20:44-05:00June 5th, 2020|Categories: American Republic, Politics, Ronald Reagan, War, World War II|

On June 6, 1984—the 40th anniversary of D-Day—President Ronald Reagan delivered a speech to an audience of D-Day veterans and world leaders commemorating the lost and living heroes. He stood at the site of the U.S. Ranger Monument at Pointe du Hoc on the northern coast of France where Allied soldiers had courageously charged [...]

Churchill and Prudence: Actions at Mers el-Kebir

By |2020-06-05T13:46:41-05:00June 5th, 2020|Categories: England, War, Winston Churchill, World War II|

Winston Churchill’s leadership through World War Two led the United Kingdom to victory against Nazi Germany. His decision at Mers el-Kebir is a clear example of statesmanship, one worth study and imitation. Winston S. Churchill demonstrated statesmanship, prudence, and determination in the destruction of the French Fleet at Oran. Prime Minister Churchill sat at [...]

The Richard Weaver-Abraham Lincoln Debate

By |2020-06-01T19:06:06-05:00June 1st, 2020|Categories: Abraham Lincoln, Civil War, Conservatism, Literature, Reason, Richard Weaver, South|

For some time I had puzzled over a discrepancy or inconsistency between two of Richard Weaver’s essays which treat of Lincoln to one degree or another. In his “Abraham Lincoln and the Argument from Definition” (1953), Weaver praises Lincoln as a “conservative” by virtue of his employment of the argument from definition on such [...]

The Battle of Jumonville Glen: The French & Indian War Begins

By |2020-05-27T10:08:43-05:00May 27th, 2020|Categories: George Washington, History, War|

While the Battle of Jumonville Glen may not be considered the start of the war from the British perspective, it resulted in an expanded colonial conflict engulfing the world in violence, which then began the rift between Britain and their colonists that set the stage for the American Revolution. In a wooded clearing overlooking [...]

Remembering in Gratitude Those Who Did Their Duty to the Republic

By |2020-05-25T19:22:03-05:00May 24th, 2020|Categories: Foreign Affairs, Memorial Day, Military, W. Winston Elliott III|

Today I honor the men and women of the United States military who have sacrificed their lives while doing their duty to the Republic. For them, and their families, I ask God to bless them and keep them. And for the fallen of the 1st Brigade Combat Team of the 82nd Airborne Division of the U.S. [...]