Four Hours of Fury: The Story of World War II’s Operation Varsity

By |2020-03-24T09:41:36-05:00March 23rd, 2020|Categories: Books, World War II|

The Rhine River was the line of no return—once the paratroopers of the 17th Airborne crossed it, they’d be over enemy territory. Some pretended to sleep while others smoked or just stared into space. No one spoke. The roar of the engines and the rattling of the airframe made conversation impossible, which was just fine. [...]

Art and Patriotism in Japanese-American Internment Camps

By |2020-03-11T03:08:59-05:00March 10th, 2020|Categories: Art, Culture, History, World War II|

During the Japanese-American internment of 1942-1946, there arose a style of art that drew from elements and techniques of Western and traditional Japanese forms. Through a closer look at these works of art, Japanese-American internment art can serve to reflect the internees’ cultural, social, and political resilience while also allowing us to study the [...]

“All Hail to Ulysses”

By |2020-03-09T14:56:36-05:00March 9th, 2020|Categories: Audio/Video, Civil War, Music|

This song was written in 1864 in honor of General Ulysses S. Grant, who was appointed commander of all the Union armies in March of that year. Words by Charles Haynes and music by J.E. Haynes. Published by Root and Cady of Chicago. —Editor Lyrics All hail to Ulysses, the patriot’s friend, The hero of [...]

Poland, Russia, Globalism, and the Legacy of World War II

By |2020-03-01T18:50:12-06:00March 1st, 2020|Categories: Communism, Conservatism, Joseph Pearce, Poland, Politics, Russia, Senior Contributors, World War II|

Though they should be on the same side in their opposition to globalism, Russia and Poland have recently entered into an unholy spat over the history of World War II. The Russian Ambassador to Poland stated recently in an interview with the Russian news site rbc.ru that relations between Russia and Poland are “the [...]

Making the World Safe for Democracy?

By |2020-02-22T18:59:10-06:00February 23rd, 2020|Categories: American Republic, Democracy, Government, Joseph Pearce, Senior Contributors, War, Western Civilization, World War I, World War II|

The belief that wars can be fought to defend democracy or to make the world safe from tyranny retains its potency and still has political mileage. It is indeed a large part of the rationale for the neoconservative worldview. Nonetheless, it is worthy of serious consideration. The tragedy of war is that it is [...]

George Washington and the Patience of Power

By |2020-03-01T02:47:33-06:00February 21st, 2020|Categories: American Founding, American Republic, George Washington, History, Timeless Essays, Virtue, War|

What enabled George Washington to be so different from other victorious commanders? He had little innate patience but held immense power. How—and where—did he learn patience? Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords our readers the opportunity to join David Hein, as he considers the virtues that endowed George Washington with perseverance and [...]

Making Sense of a Chaotic World: “Red Metal”

By |2020-02-05T23:52:25-06:00February 4th, 2020|Categories: American Republic, Books, Bradley J. Birzer, Cold War, Communism, Politics, Senior Contributors, War|

“Red Metal” fully understands that we live in a post-Communist world, a world of fundamentalisms as well as of nation-states and tenuous alliances. I highly recommend the novel, not only for its entertainment value, but also for its ability to ask all the right questions we Americans need to be asking. Red Metal, by [...]

The Treasures That Free Men Possess

By |2020-01-23T15:43:21-06:00January 22nd, 2020|Categories: Primary Documents, World War II|

Kinship among nations is not determined in such measurements as proximity, size, and age. Rather, we should turn to those inner things, those intangibles that are the real treasures free men possess. To preserve his freedom of worship, his equality before the law, his liberty to speak and act as he sees fit, subject only [...]

If Baghdad Wants Us Out, Let’s Go!

By |2020-01-21T11:41:58-06:00January 7th, 2020|Categories: American Republic, Donald Trump, Foreign Affairs, Middle East, Pat Buchanan, Politics, War|

Two months ago, crowds were in the streets of Iran cursing that regime for squandering the nation’s resources on imperial adventures in Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Yemen. Things were going America’s way. Now it is the Americans who are the targets of protests. Fifteen years after the U.S. invaded Iraq to turn Saddam Hussein’s dictatorship into a [...]

Silence, Conscience, Freedom: Terrence Malick’s “A Hidden Life”

By |2020-01-05T02:21:58-06:00January 4th, 2020|Categories: Christianity, Culture, David Deavel, Film, Senior Contributors, World War II|

Terrence Malick’s “A Hidden Life” does not drag. Its deliberate pace describing why its protagonist—a Catholic who defied Hitler’s Reich by refusing military service—died is a moving icon, a window into that mystery of why and how silence and conscience lead to true freedom. “There isn’t any twirling, is there?” I asked my former [...]

Litany of the Lost

By |2019-11-29T11:04:59-06:00November 29th, 2019|Categories: Civilization, Cold War, Imagination, Joseph Pearce, Literature, Poetry, Senior Contributors, War, Western Civilization|

Written in the after-shock of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Siegfried Sassoon’s “Litany of the Lost” laments the dehumanizing and destructive effects of technology. If Sassoon emerges as something of a prophet in the lines of this poem, he is something of a prophet at a loss. Who exactly is to deliver us from ourselves? We [...]

Triumph: How Two Dutch Girls Survived World War II

By |2019-11-26T22:10:06-06:00November 26th, 2019|Categories: Books, Film, Michael De Sapio, World War II|

In "Dutch Girl," Robert Matzen describes how the young Audrey Hepburn survived both famine and fighting in World War II. But what brings this history home for me personally is the connection with a third woman, less well-known, who also lived in Holland during those times. I feel a special interest in her story since [...]

The Spontaneous Disorder of Kansas-Nebraska

By |2019-11-22T11:38:12-06:00November 19th, 2019|Categories: American Republic, Civil War, Democracy, History|

Stephen Douglas’s faith that democratic self-government on the American frontier would create a spontaneous order of lawful and virtuous communities, especially in the face of divisive issues like slavery, was disastrously misplaced and played a significant role in starting the Civil War. The Kansas-Nebraska Act passed 165 years ago this past spring, and as cannons [...]