The Virtuous Soldier

By |2020-11-11T09:38:11-06:00November 11th, 2020|Categories: Veterans Day, Virtue, War|

The virtuous soldier is prudent in military matters, possessing a love for the homeland. The one who serves virtuously does so with perseverance and honesty. A soldier who takes virtue to heart is not only a valiant servant to the nation. The virtuous soldier is also a faithful servant of God. Today’s celebration of [...]

The Ongoing War Against Christianity

By |2020-11-07T10:51:30-06:00November 3rd, 2020|Categories: Christendom, Christianity, Evil, Truth, War|

In America today, the bewildering “what I want” faction topples statues, rewrites history, decolonizes curricula, detaches identities from ontological realities, indoctrinates our youth, and tries to impose its utopian totalitarianism. What we see unfolding in the world and in our country is war. It is the war that began for us when a woman [...]

British Surrender at Saratoga: Turning Point of the American Revolutionary War

By |2020-10-17T07:37:07-05:00October 16th, 2020|Categories: American Republic, American Revolution, History, War|

On October 17, 1777, with his troops surrounded and vastly outmanned, British General John Burgoyne surrendered. The final battle of Saratoga was a major defeat for the British and word of British surrender further rallied troops in the Continental Army and the Militias. Although the end of the war and full British surrender was [...]

Is War With China Becoming Inevitable?

By |2020-10-13T12:30:03-05:00October 13th, 2020|Categories: Foreign Affairs, Pat Buchanan, War|

Tensions are rising between the U.S. and China, as the list of ideological, political and economic clashes continues to lengthen. And there is a transparent new reality: China seems in no mood to back down. "The Indians are seeing 60,000 Chinese soldiers on their northern border," Secretary of State Michael Pompeo ominously warned on Friday. [...]

The Birth of the United States Navy

By |2020-10-12T17:22:01-05:00October 12th, 2020|Categories: American Republic, American Revolution, History, Politics, War|

The United States Navy celebrates October 13, 1775 as its birthday because that is the date on which the Continental Congress officially authorized the funding of two ships to interdict British forces. Over the course of the Revolutionary War, more than 50 Continental vessels harassed the British, seized munitions, supplied the Continental Army, and [...]

A Second Armenian Genocide

By |2020-10-01T15:41:29-05:00October 1st, 2020|Categories: Death, Europe, Middle East, Politics, War|

One hundred and forty-two years after the Congress of Berlin, the same nightmarish scenario is playing out again: Turkish forces are killing Armenians. And like the Europeans of times past, we just don’t seem to get it. How many Armenians have to die before we understand that life and culture are precious and must [...]

Teach for America’s Warriors

By |2020-09-23T14:40:53-05:00September 23rd, 2020|Categories: Education, War|

At a time in our nation’s history when the civil-military divide is widening, a Teach for America's Warriors project would close that gap and restore a more transparent understanding of the military by our civilian counterparts. But more crucially, the unseen needs of our service members’ souls would be addressed in the hopes of an [...]

Arguing With Lincoln: The Views of M.E. Bradford & Richard Weaver

By |2020-09-21T16:43:27-05:00September 21st, 2020|Categories: Abraham Lincoln, Civil War, M. E. Bradford, Richard Weaver|

If for M.E. Bradford, Abraham Lincoln was a gnostic renegade and heretic beyond the pale, he was for Richard Weaver a political and rhetorical father figure with whom one might argue but never condemn. These Southerners’ differing critiques of Lincoln’s person, views, and actions cast some light on this complex figure, one who continues [...]

“Triumph of the Will”: The Culture of Death on Screen

By |2020-09-03T00:11:08-05:00September 3rd, 2020|Categories: Culture, Death, Europe, Film, History, War, World War II|

Commissioned by Adolf Hitler, “Triumph of the Will” is a terrifying film. It is as if, for a moment, something infernal took control of the camera and caused the audience to be entranced, as it projected a lie into Germany’s consciousness, and then beyond to an unwilling world. As a consequence, 85 million people [...]

The Untold Story of Japan’s Atomic Bomb

By |2020-09-02T23:51:17-05:00September 2nd, 2020|Categories: Books, World War II|

Had the Japanese succeeded in their last-ditch atomic effort, the world’s history might have been very different. By August 1945, Japan had abandoned the idea of bombing mainland America. Instead, Japanese leaders were planning to use what atomic weapons they could produce on the Allied invasion fleet that they believed would soon be off its [...]

Honoring Reconciliation, Not Secession

By |2020-08-11T16:51:29-05:00August 5th, 2020|Categories: Civil Society, Civil War|

The symbolic honor given to Confederate leaders through statuary does not need to be interpreted as racism or an endorsement of slavery. It can also be understood as a process of reconciliation and a refusal to deny the primordial unity of the country. It is peace-making instead of imposing a public memory of defeat and [...]

Going Over Jordan: Images of Baptism in “1917”

By |2020-07-18T17:49:07-05:00July 18th, 2020|Categories: Christianity, Culture, Film, Literature, Poetry, War, World War I|

Sam Mendes’ appropriation of baptismal imagery allows the film “1917” to achieve the rare feat of portraying the First World War in terms of hope and rebirth rather than merely of pity and death. As we watch the protagonist Schofield’s journey, we recall that we have been buried and raised with Christ. I was [...]

The Politics of “Normalcy:” The American Confrontation with Progressivism

By |2020-07-13T14:32:11-05:00July 14th, 2020|Categories: American Republic, Economics, Mark Malvasi, Politics, Progressivism, Senior Contributors, War, World War I|

The Great War altered relations between the state and its citizens. The Progressives had inspired—or perhaps, more accurately, had revived—fears that regulation was necessary if modern society were to reach its potential and not descend into chaos. They had advocated state intervention to solve a host of social and economic problems and, ultimately, to [...]

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