Euripides: Poet-Prophet of Pity

By |2021-02-03T16:32:16-06:00February 3rd, 2021|Categories: Death, Great Books, Paul Krause, Senior Contributors, Theater, War|

Responding to the great bloodshed of young men, women, and virgins he experienced during the Peloponnesian War, Euripides exposes the horrors of war and its damaging effects on humans, particularly on women, in his war plays. Euripides’s dramatic tragedies appeal to our sense of pity and call for peace. The acme of Euripides’s literary genius [...]

Roosevelt’s Folly: Robert Nisbet’s Second World War

By |2021-01-25T16:07:45-06:00January 25th, 2021|Categories: History, Robert Nisbet, War, World War II|

From the beginning of their friendship, Franklin D. Roosevelt could not see Joseph Stalin as anything other than an ally, an anti-imperialist and proto-democrat, representing all that was modern and rational and equalitarian. Robert Nisbet concludes that Roosevelt’s arrogant blindness was the key to Soviet mischief. World War II—especially the European theatre—intrigued Robert A. Nisbet [...]

The Astounding Transformation of Stonewall Jackson

By |2021-01-21T12:20:44-06:00January 21st, 2021|Categories: Books, Civil War, Quotation|

As an instructor at the Virginia Military Institute, Thomas Jonathan Jackson was a poor professor, given to memorizing his lectures and delivering them in a monotone voice to his classes, word-for-word. His students teased him behind his back and fired spitballs at each other during classes, with little fear of their wooden, seemingly hapless teacher. [...]

With Charity For All: What Joe Biden Should Learn From Abe Lincoln

By |2021-01-23T13:45:36-06:00January 19th, 2021|Categories: Abraham Lincoln, American Republic, Joseph Biden, Presidency|

The new president would do well to take a lesson from history’s greatest orator and remind his increasingly diverse constituents that we all share the same uniquely American principles. Freshly sworn in after a contentious election, the new president stands to give his first inaugural address. Violence had begun to erupt immediately after the announcement [...]

“Sgt. MacKenzie”

By |2021-01-13T20:13:32-06:00January 12th, 2021|Categories: Audio/Video, Music, War|

"Sgt. MacKenzie" is a lament written and sung by Joseph Kilna MacKenzie, in memory of his great-grandfather who was killed in combat during World War I. It has been used in the 2002 movie We Were Soldiers.... Joseph MacKenzie wrote the haunting lament after the death of his wife, Christine, and in memory of his great-grandfather, [...]

The Korean War and the Nuclear Bomb

By |2020-12-30T07:54:42-06:00December 29th, 2020|Categories: American Republic, Military, War|

While the United States used nuclear weapons against Japan in 1945, she did not use them against North Korea in 1950. With vanishingly few geopolitical—or even partisan political—guardrails to keep her from doing so, why did the United States not drop the bomb in the later war? At 10:15 at night on September 6, 1950, [...]

Lessons From the American South for Healing Our Nation

By |2020-12-18T09:43:43-06:00December 17th, 2020|Categories: Civil War, South|

After the War Between the States, there was a conscious effort at reconciliation on the part of many in both North and South. This postbellum reconciliation has mostly unraveled, in no small part thanks to conservative establishmentarians who for years have refused to raise a peep—or, in many cases, collaborated—during the leftist campaign against Southern [...]

“Day of Infamy Speech”

By |2020-12-07T06:41:06-06:00December 6th, 2020|Categories: Audio/Video, Presidency, Primary Documents, World War II|

President Franklin D. Roosevelt delivered the following speech to a Joint Session of the United States Congress on December 8, 1941, one day after the Empire of Japan's attack on the U.S. naval base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Though Roosevelt referred to December 7th as a "date which will live in infamy," the speech itself [...]

Sitting Bull and the Wrath of Achilles

By |2020-12-04T11:30:40-06:00December 6th, 2020|Categories: American West, Glenn Arbery, History, Senior Contributors, War, Wyoming Catholic College|

The story of the Indian Wars for the American West in Peter Cozzens’s “The Earth Is Weeping” contains the tragic patterns of all human history. This history, like all real history, lives once we awaken memory and see the real contours of what lies before us. One of the compensations for long hours in the [...]

The Virtuous Soldier

By |2020-11-11T09:38:11-06:00November 11th, 2020|Categories: Veterans Day, Virtue, War|

The virtuous soldier is prudent in military matters, possessing a love for the homeland. The one who serves virtuously does so with perseverance and honesty. A soldier who takes virtue to heart is not only a valiant servant to the nation. The virtuous soldier is also a faithful servant of God. Today’s celebration of Veterans [...]

Veterans Day

By |2020-12-21T13:39:05-06:00November 10th, 2020|Categories: American Republic, Glenn Arbery, Patriotism, Senior Contributors, Veterans Day, Wyoming Catholic College|

For most of our veterans, it should go without saying that military discipline and experience give them a moral authority. It is a recognition—once universal—that is too often forgotten in an age when patriotism itself seems suspect to many. On this day when we honor our veterans, it’s good to recollect both the debt of [...]

The Ongoing War Against Christianity

By |2020-11-07T10:51:30-06:00November 3rd, 2020|Categories: Christendom, Christianity, Evil, Truth, War|

In America today, the bewildering “what I want” faction topples statues, rewrites history, decolonizes curricula, detaches identities from ontological realities, indoctrinates our youth, and tries to impose its utopian totalitarianism. What we see unfolding in the world and in our country is war. It is the war that began for us when a woman listened [...]

British Surrender at Saratoga: Turning Point of the American Revolutionary War

By |2020-10-17T07:37:07-05:00October 16th, 2020|Categories: American Republic, American Revolution, History, War|

On October 17, 1777, with his troops surrounded and vastly outmanned, British General John Burgoyne surrendered. The final battle of Saratoga was a major defeat for the British and word of British surrender further rallied troops in the Continental Army and the Militias. Although the end of the war and full British surrender was years [...]

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