Teach for America’s Warriors

By |2020-09-23T14:40:53-05:00September 23rd, 2020|Categories: Education, War|

At a time in our nation’s history when the civil-military divide is widening, a Teach for America's Warriors project would close that gap and restore a more transparent understanding of the military by our civilian counterparts. But more crucially, the unseen needs of our service members’ souls would be addressed in the hopes of an [...]

Arguing With Lincoln: The Views of M.E. Bradford & Richard Weaver

By |2020-09-21T16:43:27-05:00September 21st, 2020|Categories: Abraham Lincoln, Civil War, M. E. Bradford, Richard Weaver|

If for M.E. Bradford, Abraham Lincoln was a gnostic renegade and heretic beyond the pale, he was for Richard Weaver a political and rhetorical father figure with whom one might argue but never condemn. These Southerners’ differing critiques of Lincoln’s person, views, and actions cast some light on this complex figure, one who continues [...]

“Triumph of the Will”: The Culture of Death on Screen

By |2020-09-03T00:11:08-05:00September 3rd, 2020|Categories: Culture, Death, Europe, Film, History, War, World War II|

Commissioned by Adolf Hitler, “Triumph of the Will” is a terrifying film. It is as if, for a moment, something infernal took control of the camera and caused the audience to be entranced, as it projected a lie into Germany’s consciousness, and then beyond to an unwilling world. As a consequence, 85 million people [...]

The Untold Story of Japan’s Atomic Bomb

By |2020-09-02T23:51:17-05:00September 2nd, 2020|Categories: Books, World War II|

Had the Japanese succeeded in their last-ditch atomic effort, the world’s history might have been very different. By August 1945, Japan had abandoned the idea of bombing mainland America. Instead, Japanese leaders were planning to use what atomic weapons they could produce on the Allied invasion fleet that they believed would soon be off its [...]

Honoring Reconciliation, Not Secession

By |2020-08-11T16:51:29-05:00August 5th, 2020|Categories: Civil Society, Civil War|

The symbolic honor given to Confederate leaders through statuary does not need to be interpreted as racism or an endorsement of slavery. It can also be understood as a process of reconciliation and a refusal to deny the primordial unity of the country. It is peace-making instead of imposing a public memory of defeat and [...]

Going Over Jordan: Images of Baptism in “1917”

By |2020-07-18T17:49:07-05:00July 18th, 2020|Categories: Christianity, Culture, Film, Literature, Poetry, War, World War I|

Sam Mendes’ appropriation of baptismal imagery allows the film “1917” to achieve the rare feat of portraying the First World War in terms of hope and rebirth rather than merely of pity and death. As we watch the protagonist Schofield’s journey, we recall that we have been buried and raised with Christ. I was [...]

The Politics of “Normalcy:” The American Confrontation with Progressivism

By |2020-07-13T14:32:11-05:00July 14th, 2020|Categories: American Republic, Economics, Mark Malvasi, Politics, Progressivism, Senior Contributors, War, World War I|

The Great War altered relations between the state and its citizens. The Progressives had inspired—or perhaps, more accurately, had revived—fears that regulation was necessary if modern society were to reach its potential and not descend into chaos. They had advocated state intervention to solve a host of social and economic problems and, ultimately, to [...]

The Native Americans Who Owned Slaves

By |2020-07-06T17:34:23-05:00July 6th, 2020|Categories: American Republic, Civil War, History, Slavery, War|

Europeans introduced the “Five Civilized Tribes” of the southeast to the institution of racial slavery. And during the Civil War, the Five Civilized Tribes fought on both the Union and Confederate sides. This often-overlooked part of American history takes on new significance in light of today’s debates over slavery reparations and monuments to those [...]

“Mount Rushmore”

By |2020-07-06T18:42:25-05:00July 6th, 2020|Categories: Abraham Lincoln, American Republic, Audio/Video, George Washington, History, Music, Thomas Jefferson|

Drawing from American musical sources and texts, Michael Dougherty's composition for chorus and orchestra echoes the resonance and dissonance of Mount Rushmore as a complex icon of American history. Like Mount Rushmore, the libretto is carved out of the words of each President. Mount Rushmore (2010) for chorus and orchestra is inspired by the monumental [...]

Nothing But Glory Gained: Pickett’s Charge at Gettysburg

By |2020-06-30T19:10:31-05:00July 2nd, 2020|Categories: Civil War, History, Robert Cheeks, Robert E. Lee, South|

On that summer-hot afternoon at Gettysburg, after two days of fighting in the summer-lush Pennsylvania countryside, the fate of two nations still hung in the balance. General Robert E. Lee intended to tip the scales. Just before 3 o’clock on the morning of July 3, 1863, Robert E. Lee rose by starlight, ate a [...]

“Stand Watie”

By |2020-06-23T17:32:54-05:00June 23rd, 2020|Categories: Audio/Video, Civil War, Music|

Stand Watie (Cherokee: ᏕᎦᏔᎦ, romanized: Degataga, lit. 'Stand firm') (December 12, 1806 – September 9, 1871), also known as Standhope Uwatie, Tawkertawker, and Isaac S. Watie, was a leader of the Cherokee Nation. They allied with the Confederacy, and he was the only Native American to attain a general's rank in the Civil War, Confederacy [...]

“Their Finest Hour”: The Legendary Speech

By |2020-06-17T16:22:46-05:00June 17th, 2020|Categories: History, War, Winston Churchill, World War II|

On June 18, 1940, two days after France had sought an armistice with Germany, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill addressed the House of Commons about the calamitous turn of events in Europe. Britain now stood alone against Adolf Hitler’s military machine, and in this speech, Churchill bolsters his countrymen’s courage to fight for freedom [...]

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