A Worthy Chase: Pursuing an Ideal Education

By |2021-04-18T21:19:06-05:00April 18th, 2021|Categories: Books, Classical Learning, E.B., Education, Eva Brann, Liberal Learning, St. John's College|

Eva Brann’s latest book, “Pursuits of Happiness,” is a collection of essays which range from Aeschylus to Austen, with topics spanning the nature of time itself to Sacred Scripture. Interspersed here are two parts constituting the whole of an ideal education. Pursuits of Happiness: On Being Interested by Eva Brann (640 pages, Paul Dry Books, [...]

Zoom, the Pandemic, & the Death of Sacred Spaces

By |2021-04-15T12:32:24-05:00April 18th, 2021|Categories: Community, Coronavirus, Culture, Education, Science, Technology|

When the pandemic separated us from our sacred spaces like the church or other communal places, Zoom promised connection. However, Zoom—as a medium of education and relationship—prevents us from truly connecting because of technology’s nature to divide, distract, and isolate. But when it came to the subject of letters, Theuth said, ‘But this study, King [...]

“The Karate Kid” & the Merits of Authority-Based Discipleship

By |2021-04-16T10:56:48-05:00April 16th, 2021|Categories: Culture, Education, Film, Liberal Learning|

In the 1984 film “The Karate Kid,” Mr. Miyagi’s teaching method may seem scandalous to Western eyes: Either Daniel does things his way, or not at all. The wise mentor refuses to reveal to Daniel the reason for his menial exercises. But it is precisely the virtue of submission and obedience that is essential for [...]

Teaching Dante

By |2021-04-07T11:37:17-05:00April 9th, 2021|Categories: Dante, Education, Great Books, Joseph Pearce, Senior Contributors|

Dante’s “Divine Comedy” is often taught poorly, if even taught at all. At the root of the problem is the tendency to remain trapped in hell, never venturing forth into purgatory and paradise. This is a consequence of the way that Dante has been taught for decades—indeed, for centuries. Lovers of the Great Books argue [...]

Keep Computers Out of Kindergarten

By |2021-03-23T16:38:19-05:00March 23rd, 2021|Categories: Education, Science, Technology|

Although personal computers in the high school classroom were becoming a norm before COVID, the pandemic accelerated the process and forced the rest of K-12 to adopt them. By all means, introduce computers in middle school and teach computer technology in high school, but keep them out of elementary schools. Of the many bizarre responses [...]

The Legacy of John Senior

By |2021-03-12T10:02:49-06:00March 11th, 2021|Categories: Catholicism, Education, Humanities, John Senior, Joseph Pearce, Liberal Learning, Senior Contributors|

At the heart of John Senior’s vision for the humanities was a Thomistic understanding of the path of true perception. St. Thomas taught that humility opens the eyes of wonder, and that it is wonder that leads to contemplation and to the dilation of the mind and soul into the fullness of the presence of [...]

Can’t Read, Won’t Read: Shakespeare in the Public Schools

By |2021-03-03T12:58:24-06:00March 4th, 2021|Categories: Education, Great Books, Joseph Pearce, Modernity, Senior Contributors, William Shakespeare|

One thing that is abundantly evident from the demands for the cancellation of Shakespeare in public schools is that none of those demanding his removal from the curriculum have been able to read or understand his work. Had they been able to do so, they would know that Shakespeare’s plays show us relevant, perennial truths. [...]

Reviving the Liberal Arts in the Age of Cancel Culture

By |2021-03-03T16:25:40-06:00March 3rd, 2021|Categories: Education, Liberal Arts, Liberal Learning|

The disappearance of a rigorous liberal arts curriculum has contributed to the decline of the free exchange of ideas on college and university campuses today. Renewing the study of the liberal arts is essential to resolving the free speech crisis and forming well-rounded citizens who are prepared to serve their communities, families, and country. Over [...]

Will They Come for the Homeschoolers?

By |2021-03-03T09:18:05-06:00March 2nd, 2021|Categories: Education, Homeschooling|

As our society becomes increasingly religiously unaffiliated, the voices contending that traditional Christian teachings on sexuality and gender are inherently oppressive, and even abusive, will get louder. Perhaps I was wrong. Just a few weeks ago, right after the presidential inauguration, one of my wife’s close friends, another parent in our homeschooling co-op, expressed her [...]

San Francisco’s Assault on History

By |2021-02-14T20:10:26-06:00February 14th, 2021|Categories: Education, History|

In late January, the San Francisco Board of Education declared that schools named after such people as Abraham Lincoln, George Washington, Franklin Roosevelt, and even Dianne Feinstein would be renamed. They said that such people were problematic and had ties to a variety of racist incidents. […]

Why Literature Matters

By |2021-02-05T12:12:02-06:00February 5th, 2021|Categories: Education, Glenn Arbery, Great Books, Senior Contributors, Wyoming Catholic College|

Simply speaking, literature works with the mode of thought most natural to the human mind—that is, thinking in images, comparisons, characters, speeches, and actions. Every household of parents and children has a cast of distinct characters whose various performances become stories in the family. Our five-year-old grandson Andrew, for example, though a domestic terrorist by [...]

Shakespeare and “Hateful Rhetoric”

By |2021-01-29T15:11:50-06:00January 29th, 2021|Categories: Education, Glenn Arbery, Great Books, Politics, Senior Contributors, William Shakespeare, Wyoming Catholic College|

In the current battle for the classroom between traditional literature and overt propaganda, #DisruptTexts and its allies attack Shakespeare for hate speech. But is Shakespeare promulgating hateful rhetoric? Or is he thinking deeply into the dramatic situation of racial and religious conflict in the Mediterranean world to reveal the human heart in conflict with itself? [...]

Renewing the Clash & Combination of Western Education

By |2021-01-28T22:55:19-06:00January 28th, 2021|Categories: Books, Culture, David Deavel, Education, History, Senior Contributors, Western Civilization|

“The Heart of Culture” traces the success of Western education, rooted in the very nature of Western civilization as a historical “clash and combination” of Greek culture and Judeo-Christian religion. It is the perfect book for parents, teachers, and administrators who are dissatisfied with modern education but don’t know why. The Heart of Culture: A [...]

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