Horseman and Poet

By |2019-04-14T16:26:48-05:00April 13th, 2019|Categories: Culture, Glenn Arbery, Modernity, Senior Contributors, Writing|

This morning, I had the privilege of speaking to the entire student body and faculty of Portsmouth Abbey School on the eastern shore of Narragansett Bay, nine or ten miles north of Newport, Rhode Island. My topic was “why literature matters,” but my emphasis was on the way that identity politics ruins both literature [...]

Intellect and Intuition: Longing for Insight?

By |2019-04-08T17:39:56-05:00April 8th, 2019|Categories: Classical Education, E.B., Education, Eva Brann, In Honor of Eva Brann at 90 Series, Liberal Arts, Liberal Learning, St. John's College|

We say of people that they have intuition. We ap­parently mean that they apprehend things directly without belaboring them by analysis or even without accosting them with too close an inspection. Intuition is what we long for, thinking is what we can do. What follows? You asked me to speak about “Intellect and Intuition,” [...]

When Everybody’s an “Expert”

By |2019-04-02T21:11:38-05:00April 2nd, 2019|Categories: Education, Liberal Learning, Wisdom|

America’s everybody-gets-a-trophy syndrome has apparently made its way deep into the corridors of academia. Many times I’ve run into those who profess expertise in some field, only to scratch the surface and discover their academic credentials to be less than stellar. Ambrose Bierce defined education as “that which discloses to the wise and disguises from [...]

“Little Places” and the Recovery of Civilization

By |2019-04-02T09:31:25-05:00April 1st, 2019|Categories: E.B., Education, Eva Brann, In Honor of Eva Brann at 90 Series, Liberal Learning, St. John's College, Wisdom|

It is mainly little places which permit the modesty of pace needed for long thoughts, and the conditions of closeness under which human beings begin to stand out and become distinct in their first and second nature. These places are the veritable harbors of refuge and recovery for civilization… Today, the same day on [...]

Two Kinds of Education

By |2019-03-31T22:19:34-05:00March 31st, 2019|Categories: Classical Education, Education, Liberal Arts, Liberal Learning, Modernity, Senior Contributors, Steven Jonathan Rummelsburg|

We ought to discern the truth about our modern schools, remove our children from their ravages, and turn to the building of homeschooling communities and to involvement in classical charter schools. It is the only reasonable response to our modern schools, which have become unreasonable and morally irresponsible. As parents bring school age children [...]

A Manifesto for Liberal Education

By |2019-03-25T14:34:55-05:00March 25th, 2019|Categories: E.B., Education, Eva Brann, In Honor of Eva Brann at 90 Series, Liberal Arts, Liberal Learning, St. John's College|

Since liberal education is non-academic, in my sense, it has real gravity, moral gravity. And so it is, finally, also concerned with questions of “good and evil.” The college years are the time for students to frame those moral allegiances that will help them decide more sure-footedly how to act when leisure is over [...]

The School for Scandal: A Parents’ Guide to Colleges in a Corrupt Era

By |2019-03-19T23:25:45-05:00March 19th, 2019|Categories: Education, St. John's College|

The recent scandal concerning parents who paid to bribe school officials to admit their children into college tells me that most parents know nothing about higher education in America. Here’s the straight skinny! “Education” is a way to understanding Western culture and languages, and the history, culture, and languages of other cultures. There are [...]

Killing Socrates: The Death of a Great Books Program

By |2019-03-09T09:22:14-05:00March 8th, 2019|Categories: Classical Education, Classical Learning, Classics, Culture, Education, Great Books, Humanities, John Senior, Liberal Arts, Liberal Learning, Wyoming Catholic College|

Few people know that in the early 1970s a “great books” program, founded by John Senior and two other professors, flourished at a large state university in the midwest. Even fewer know of its slow demise. Editor’s Note: Robert Carlson was a student and friend of John Senior, one of three founders of the [...]

A Light in the East: Thoughts on Education from Japan

By |2019-03-07T00:26:45-05:00March 6th, 2019|Categories: Books, Culture, Education, Joseph Pearce, Senior Contributors, Western Civilization|

Having read Fr. Peter Milward’s book, My Idea of a University in Japan, I am firmly of the opinion that it needs an audience in the West. It is universally applicable and relevant to those seeking a deeper understanding of what constitutes an authentic university education. Last year saw the passing of Fr. Peter Milward, [...]

Storytelling and How We Learn

By |2019-03-07T00:06:27-05:00March 6th, 2019|Categories: Civilization, Culture, Education|

Stories convey wisdom about ourselves, our culture, and human nature. The existence of Bigfoot or the Abominable Snowman is more believable than the existence of a civilized people who have no need of poets or sages. Whatever I teach, I teach storytelling because it is an expression of human creativity that provides perspective. Stories help [...]

On Loving Writing

By |2019-03-01T16:12:44-05:00March 1st, 2019|Categories: Bradley J. Birzer, Love, Senior Contributors, Writing|

Few things in life have given me as much pleasure as writing has. I’ve never been what anyone would describe as “low-energy,” but I’ve also not always been exactly sure how to release my own energies, especially when it came to writing. I’ve also always possessed the creative impulse, but that impulse was frustrated [...]

Roots of the World: The Program of St. John’s College

By |2019-02-27T14:12:28-05:00February 25th, 2019|Categories: E.B., Education, Eva Brann, In Honor of Eva Brann at 90 Series, Liberal Arts, Liberal Learning, St. John's College|

Every plan of education is fraught with implicit philosophical principle. Since the program of St. John's College is devoted to that peculiar kind of learning which of necessity includes a reflection on its own conditions, most members of the college accept the obligation of engaging in ever-recurrent discussion and review of the philosophical bases that [...]

Remembering To Be

By |2019-02-25T10:40:37-05:00February 24th, 2019|Categories: Charles Dickens, Education, Glenn Arbery, Liberal Learning, Literature, Timeless Essays, Wyoming Catholic College|

“Forgetfulness of being”—perhaps we could also call it “forgetfulness of givenness”—underlies most of the problems that we face. To forget being means to forget how astonishing it is that anything exists at all... Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords our readers the opportunity to join Glenn Arbery, as he ponders the wonder of [...]