England

Tolkien & Anglo-Saxon England: Protectors of Christendom

By |2019-11-02T08:12:19-06:00November 10th, 2019|Categories: Bradley J. Birzer, Christendom, Christian Humanism, England, Essential, History, J.R.R. Tolkien, Myth, Senior Contributors, StAR, Timeless Essays|

J.R.R. Tolkien believed that the Anglo-Saxon world might offer us strength to redeem Christendom. The hero of “The Lord of the Rings,” after all, is an Anglo-Saxon farmer turned citizen-warrior. Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords our readers the opportunity to join Bradley J. Birzer, as he discusses J.R.R. Tolkien’s christological interpretation [...]

The Queen’s Speech and the Principle of Subsidiarity

By |2019-11-03T20:05:11-06:00November 3rd, 2019|Categories: Conservatism, England, Europe, Joseph Pearce, Politics, Senior Contributors|

In her recent speech, Queen Elizabeth began by stating that it was always her Government’s priority to secure the United Kingdom’s departure from the European Union. What is particularly exciting about this statement is that it recognizes an ancient wisdom, and most neglected subject: subsidiarity. Any reference to the Queen’s Speech might bring to [...]

Brexit and Evensong

By |2019-10-26T21:55:19-06:00October 26th, 2019|Categories: Conservatism, England, Europe, Glenn Arbery, Politics, Senior Contributors, Wyoming Catholic College|

While in London, my wife and I went to evensong at Westminster Abbey. Throughout the trip, evensong somehow gave us the symbol—high, formal, and beautiful—of the end of the day, both of British greatness and the vitality of Europe. After the Vanenburg Conference at Oxford earlier this month, my wife and I went to [...]

Brexit or Leave It

By |2019-10-09T06:43:29-06:00October 8th, 2019|Categories: Conservatism, England, Europe, Government, Joseph Pearce, Politics, Senior Contributors|

What does the European Union have in common with Hotel California? The answer is that you can check out any time you like, but you can never leave. Take, for instance, the ongoing Brexit saga. Over and again, in one democratic vote after another, the British people have made it abundantly clear that they [...]

An Introduction to English War Poetry

By |2019-08-09T21:38:25-06:00August 9th, 2019|Categories: Death, England, History, Literature, Poetry, War, World War I|

The poet’s career doesn’t end once he dies. The soldier’s career arguably does. The poet-soldier, then, has died physically, but what remains of him is his art. Both Edward Thomas and Francis Ledwidge managed to create something that transcended their persons and lasted long after being killed in war. When we think of English [...]

The Iconoclasm and Profanity of Roger Scruton’s Sacking

By |2019-05-03T10:08:53-06:00May 1st, 2019|Categories: Conservatism, Culture War, England, Free Speech, Paul Krause, Roger Scruton|

The impetuous call to sack Roger Scruton shows those who clamored for the blade of the guillotine to fall on his head for what they are. His sacking also shows the concerted effort to demonize and silence anyone outside the public orthodoxy of thought... Sir Roger Scruton is one of the preeminent conservative intellectuals in [...]

Banning Books and Burning Heretics

By |2019-07-23T11:43:06-06:00January 24th, 2019|Categories: Civil Society, Culture, Culture War, England, Ethics, Free Speech, Joseph Pearce, Literature, Modernity, Poetry, Rights, Senior Contributors, Western Civilization, Western Tradition|

Advocates of the liberal arts include “heretical” books in the great conversation, whereas political liberals seek to silence them as dangerous. As we have seen in Nazi Germany and in communist countries, the banning of “heretical” books ends with the burning of “heretics”… Several years ago, I visited the two-room shack in Tupelo, Mississippi, [...]

Thomas More on Conscience, Courage, & the Comedy of Politics

By |2019-06-13T12:38:35-06:00December 29th, 2018|Categories: Christendom, Christian Humanism, Civil Society, England, History, Natural Law, Philosophy, Politics, Thomas More, Wisdom|

As the gulf between classical and postmodern notions of conscience and government grows ever wider and their clashes more explosive, it is high time for the jury to give renewed attention to the nuances of Thomas More’s understanding of the apparently competing, but ultimately harmonious, demands of divine, natural, and human law… In August of 1534 Margaret [...]

The Underground Shakespeare

By |2018-12-22T09:16:58-06:00December 21st, 2018|Categories: Books, Culture, Dwight Longenecker, England, History, Literature, Mystery, Senior Contributors, Theater, William Shakespeare|

Despite their obscurity, The Rape of Lucrece and Venus and Adonis were Shakespeare’s best-sellers. But why were these poems so wildly popular? In Shadowplay—her first book about the secret messages in Shakespeare’s plays—Clare Asquith explains what sparked first her imagination and then her research: In the early 1980s she and her husband attended a [...]

Thomas Gray’s Desperate Pastoral

By |2018-08-15T09:54:33-06:00August 14th, 2018|Categories: England, History, Literature, Poetry|

In his "Elegy," Thomas Gray wrote a great, some­times mystifying and troubling poem, and, where the pastoral impulse is concerned, an admonishing one... No one born after the French Revolution, said the durable Talleyrand, can know how sweet life can be. This sentiment was quoted in his book about Metternich by that unsuspected romantic Henry [...]

G.K. Chesterton’s “What’s Wrong With the World”

By |2019-04-18T11:17:36-06:00August 8th, 2018|Categories: Civilization, Culture, England, G.K. Chesterton, Politics|

The next time someone tells you that reactionaries and other assorted defenders of the family and private property do not care about the poor, invite them to read G.K. Chesterton’s final words in What’s Wrong with the World… A man of great good cheer, G. K. Chesterton was well known for his sunny disposition [...]