Should Conservatives Embrace a Form of Socialism?

By |2020-02-25T01:06:01-06:00February 24th, 2020|Categories: Conservatism, Liberalism, Socialism|Tags: |

We conservatives need to begin approaching ideas rather than labels. Where we rightfully oppose Marxism for adopting a soullessly ideological worldview, we should be careful to note that Liberalism, though as dangerous as any other ideology when adopted with fanaticism, is also too close to home for us to dismiss in the same way. [...]

The Best Way to Fight Leftism

By |2020-02-23T23:30:39-06:00February 23rd, 2020|Categories: Conservatism, Liberalism|

While the conservative must access a whole library of great books to make his case for the Western tradition, the leftist can just recite mantras in his call for a clean-slate utopia. In musical terms, the conservative must compose a great opera while the leftist responds with a pop song. So how do we conservatives [...]

Henri Lefebvre and the Urban Revolution

By |2020-02-21T11:39:24-06:00February 21st, 2020|Categories: Capitalism, Conservatism, Economics, Philosophy|

A sociologist born at the turn of the twentieth century, Henri Lefebvre is a figure whose writings shed light on questions pertaining to rural life versus urban life, theories of the state, modernity, and the role of social space and markets in cities. Beyond sociology, he is considered an important figure in both urban [...]

The Original Perversity in the Socialist Heart

By |2020-02-19T00:05:53-06:00February 18th, 2020|Categories: Conservatism, History, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Liberalism, Politics, Socialism|

Socialism’s nuances and ideological subtleties can be latent, unknown, and often unrecognizable. To truly grasp the depth of the socialists’ arguments, we must first look at socialism’s ideological origins—specifically, Jean Rousseau’s invalidation of Original Sin. As socialism ascends in prominence, many of its proponents are open and outspoken with their socialist political positions. These [...]

The Hounds in Full Cry: Roger Scruton’s Conservatism

By |2020-02-17T16:49:05-06:00February 17th, 2020|Categories: Bradley J. Birzer, Conservatism, Government, Politics, Roger Scruton, Senior Contributors, Western Tradition|

In almost every way, Sir Roger Scruton was a thorn in the side of modernity and post-modernity. With Burke, he fought a “forlorn but dignified resistance to the tides of history.” He sought a future in which the national loyalty would endure, holding things together, providing all of us with sources of hope. No [...]

T.E. Hulme on the Religious Attitude

By |2020-02-09T02:16:32-06:00February 8th, 2020|Categories: Bradley J. Birzer, Christian Humanism, Conservatism, Modernity, Senior Contributors, T.E. Hulme|

“Man is in no sense perfect, but a wretched creature who can yet apprehend perfection.”—T.E. Hulme The mediocrity and driftless purposelessness of liberalism had permeated and shattered true humanist culture at the turn of the nineteenth-to-the-twentieth century, the great historian and man of letters Christopher Dawson feared. Too many unthinking liberals had tried to [...]

The Ghost of Dickens Past

By |2020-02-06T22:02:50-06:00February 6th, 2020|Categories: Books, Charles Dickens, Conservatism, Literature|

Critics have well acquainted us with Charles Dickens the sentimentalist—lover of the oppressed, defender of childhood innocence, decrier of England’s industrial sweatshops. But seldom have they given readers a glimpse of the Dickens with whom Myron Magnet deals in “Dickens and the Social Order”: Dickens the philosophical traditionalist. Dickens and the Social Order, by [...]

The Dark Road From Abortion to Infanticide in American Law

By |2020-02-07T10:49:09-06:00February 3rd, 2020|Categories: Abortion, Conservatism, Donald Trump, Government, Liberalism, Politics, Senior Contributors, Thomas R. Ascik|

The contemporary frequency of parents, especially mothers, killing their children—not only newborn babies but toddlers too—is a new phenomenon. Does this have something to do with the relentless loosening of abortion laws in America since Roe v. Wade? We live in an era where we pretend that we do not know when life begins, [...]

Thinking Progressively by Acting Conservatively

By |2020-02-03T16:45:37-06:00February 3rd, 2020|Categories: Conservatism, David Deavel, Education, Equality, Liberalism, Politics, Progressivism, Senior Contributors|

My progressive friends assure me that they are looking out for children, minorities, and especially minority children. The problem with this conceit is that when it comes to closing the achievement gap between Latino and white children on the one hand, and black and white children on the other, the only progressive cities are [...]

A Question of Politics

By |2020-02-01T22:00:19-06:00February 1st, 2020|Categories: Catholicism, Christianity, Conservatism, Glenn Arbery, Modernity, Politics, Senior Contributors, Wyoming Catholic College|

An interesting thing—somewhat alarming, always surprising—happens at Wyoming Catholic College and probably at other small, strongly Catholic colleges like ours. A number of students express dislike, even disdain, for politics. We have noticed it for years. They don’t see what contemporary events have to do with real education. […]

Russell Kirk’s Beauty and Civilization

By |2020-01-31T22:18:17-06:00January 31st, 2020|Categories: Beauty, Bradley J. Birzer, Conservatism, Modernity, Religion, Russell Kirk, Senior Contributors, Western Civilization|

In the late 1950s, as Russell Kirk considered what needed to be conserved in the Western tradition as well as what needed to be discarded, he lamented that much of what the West did was “uglify.”  It had forgotten not only the necessity of beauty, but it had forgotten how to define beauty. It [...]

Paul Elmer More’s Nietzsche

By |2020-01-22T11:15:07-06:00January 24th, 2020|Categories: Bradley J. Birzer, Conservatism, Friedrich Nietzsche, Paul Elmer More, Philosophy, Senior Contributors|

Paul Elmer More offered one of the single best critiques of Friedrich Nietzsche, delving deeply into the essence of his thought, in both attraction and repulsion, finding that it is in the attempt to reconcile the love and apprehension about Nietzsche that best allows one to understand him. “Who has ever been concerned for [...]