Russell Kirk Reconsidered

By |2021-04-28T15:49:35-05:00April 28th, 2021|Categories: Bradley J. Birzer, Conservatism, Russell Kirk, Senior Contributors, The Conservative Mind, Timeless Essays, Western Civilization, Western Tradition|

Russell Kirk gave voice to a myriad of persons, personalities, and ideas circulating in the decade after the Second World War, just as the West was trying to understand what it stood for, rather than what it stood against. The latter was easy. Communism and fascism were evil. But, what exactly did the West stand [...]

Samuel Taylor Coleridge: A Romantic Conservative

By |2021-04-20T14:05:04-05:00April 22nd, 2021|Categories: Conservatism, Philosophy, Political Philosophy, Samuel Taylor Coleridge|

Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s romantic conservatism is passionate, incisive, and high-minded. His notion of the “Idea” is persuasive in regard to how it exists in human society, and he lit the way to resolving the ever-present conservative tension between theory and practice. The life of Samuel Taylor Coleridge, if tumultuous and at times disastrous, was a [...]

Artistic Entrepreneurship: The Way Forward in a New Digital Era

By |2021-03-24T19:12:06-05:00March 24th, 2021|Categories: Audio/Video, Conservatism, Culture War, Music, Technology, Uncategorized|

I believe we are stepping into a new era for the arts, particularly for Christians and conservatives, if we are willing to fight hard for it. We have been hidden too long, and our new digital world, as foreign and alien as it may seem to the thoughtful artist, can be an ally rather than [...]

Disraelian Conservatism & the Romantic Imagination

By |2021-03-18T11:45:36-05:00March 22nd, 2021|Categories: Conservatism, Imagination, Literature, Moral Imagination, Politics|

For the conservative Benjamin Disraeli, the answers to the political problems of the present lie in the restoration of the ideals of the past. Restoration is not an attempt to reject the present and escape or return to an earlier state of a society; it is rather a creative, imaginative effort to infuse the present [...]

Bill Buckley’s Mischievous Magazine

By |2021-03-08T20:53:12-06:00March 8th, 2021|Categories: Bradley J. Birzer, Conservatism, Media, Senior Contributors|

'National Review' magazine remains my constant companion, even when I sometimes disagree with her. Indeed, NR's mission has been just and worthy, as she has remained adamantly anti-communist, pro-life, and just about right on every social issue, while accommodating the variety of “sects” within the American conservative movement. Sometime around 1981 or so, Bill Buckley [...]

Innocence Lost: Reading Nineteenth-Century American Literature

By |2021-03-02T00:45:37-06:00March 2nd, 2021|Categories: American Republic, Conservatism, Great Books, Herman Melville, Liberalism, Literature, Paul Krause, Senior Contributors|

In the wellspring of classic nineteenth-century American literature, a spectacular theme unites our greatest authors. They, in various ways, challenge the naïve optimism of the “American Adam” and American liberalism. They are deeply conservative in their skepticism toward human and civilizational progress and perfection. It is true that the classics, especially Virgil and Cicero, along [...]

Standing Athwart or Pulling the Plug at ‘National Review’?

By |2021-03-11T08:00:00-06:00February 28th, 2021|Categories: Conservatism, David Deavel, Politics, Senior Contributors|

‘National Review’ seems collectively incapable of seeing that it is no longer standing athwart history but is instead mostly athwart rank-and-file conservatives. NR is more liberal echo than conservative choice these days, and I don’t see any sign of recovery. William F. Buckley “Every young writer, I imagine,” wrote Ross Douthat, “has their [...]

Rush Limbaugh, Defender of Life

By |2021-04-16T12:20:41-05:00February 25th, 2021|Categories: Abortion, Conservatism, Media|

As I listened, some 16 years ago, to Rush Limbaugh defend Terry Schiavo's life and all human life, I remember thinking at the time that it was the most eloquent defense of life I had ever heard. Although it was 16 years ago, I remember it vividly. I was driving down I-270 in Maryland toward [...]

Rod Dreher and The Nostalgia Option

By |2021-01-23T19:01:56-06:00January 23rd, 2021|Categories: Books, Conservatism, Culture, Dwight Longenecker, Politics, Senior Contributors|

As techno-totalitarianism really gets into gear, it is up to each one of us to root our lives, our homes, our schools, and our parishes in the eternal values of the Christian faith and classical learning—and we need to do so with imagination and realism, avoiding the temptation to become nostalgic dreamers. Live Not by [...]

Reflections on Imaginative Conservatism

By |2021-01-21T12:00:41-06:00January 21st, 2021|Categories: Conservatism, E.B., Essential, Eva Brann, Imagination, In Honor of Eva Brann at 90 Series, St. John's College, The Imaginative Conservative|

My first and last care is not politics but education. Education seems to me inherently conservative, being the transmission, and thus the saving, of a tradition’s treasures of fiction and thought. But education is also inherently imaginative. Author’s Note: I wish to dedicate this essay to a writer of books whose greatness is at once [...]

The Crisis of Liberalism

By |2021-01-17T01:04:36-06:00January 16th, 2021|Categories: Books, Conservatism, Liberalism|

Today’s Democratic party is not the party of Joe Biden’s youth or middle age. As author Fred Siegel correctly observes, it is a top-bottom coalition of the well-credentialed (but not well-educated) upper-middle class and beyond, plus those who work for, depend upon, or otherwise presume to shelter under the benevolent arm of government. The Crisis [...]

Russell Kirk’s Beauty and Civilization

By |2020-12-31T22:59:39-06:00December 31st, 2020|Categories: Beauty, Bradley J. Birzer, Conservatism, Modernity, Religion, Russell Kirk, Senior Contributors, Timeless Essays, Western Civilization|

As the old year ends and the new year arrives, The Imaginative Conservative looks back at some of its finest essays of 2020. —Editors In the late 1950s, as Russell Kirk considered what needed to be conserved in the Western tradition as well as what needed to be discarded, he lamented that much of what [...]

Go to Top