James Burnham’s & Daniel Bell’s Critiques of Globalization & Liberalism

By |2019-05-02T20:50:26-05:00May 2nd, 2019|Categories: Capitalism, Civilization, Economics, History, Politics|

The rise of a post-industrial, technologically advanced society affected social and economic structures worldwide. James Burnham and Daniel Bell foresaw how drastically society would change over the following decades, as well as the consequences of these tendencies toward globalism and liberalism. We like to say that every idea, every thought, every emotion—no matter how [...]

Progressivism and Democracy

By |2019-03-10T14:45:13-05:00March 10th, 2019|Categories: American Republic, Capitalism, Defining America Series, Democracy, Economics, History, Mark Malvasi, Politics, Senior Contributors|

Could democratic government solve, or even effectively address, the problems of a modern society? For decades, this question vexed Progressive reformers as they navigated the transformation of the United States from a country of small farms and rural communities to a nation of factories, corporations, and cities. Before the Civil War, Americans never doubted [...]

An Introduction to Conservatism for “Well-Meaning Liberals”

By |2018-12-18T22:21:52-05:00December 18th, 2018|Categories: Books, Conservatism, Economics, Government, Natural Rights Tradition, Political Philosophy, Senior Contributors, Thomas R. Ascik, Western Civilization|

Instead of considering contemporary political issues, or politicians, Roger Scruton attempts to rebuild conservatism by looking seriously at its past… Conservatism: An Invitation to the Great Tradition, by Roger Scruton (176 pages, All Points Books, 2018) In his Conservatism, An Introduction to the Great Tradition (2017), long-time Anglo-American conservative champion and author Sir Roger Scruton [...]

Discussing “Capitalism”

By |2018-12-16T23:13:04-05:00December 16th, 2018|Categories: Capitalism, Economics, Free Markets, Free Trade, Government, Joseph Pearce, Political Economy, Senior Contributors|

Speaking personally, I’d rather discuss many things during this joyful season of Advent than “capitalism.” And yet Matthew Summers’ recent essay “In Defense of Capitalism” for The Imaginative Conservative has prompted me to comment on the topic, albeit briefly. […]

Edmund Burke on Revolutionary Armies and Taxes

By |2018-12-13T11:06:25-05:00December 13th, 2018|Categories: Bradley J. Birzer, Civil Society, Conservation, Edmund Burke, Edmund Burke series by Bradley Birzer, Revolution, Taxes|

Though a classic in its own right, and arguably the first book on conservatism in the modern world, Edmund Burke’s Reflections on the Revolution in France of 1790 is inconsistent as a coherent work. And, yet, even in its unevenness, it reveals an act of genius. Burke himself points out that the greatest and truest things in [...]

The Best Possible World and Concrete Living

By |2018-12-14T00:37:06-05:00December 11th, 2018|Categories: Adam Smith, Capitalism, Free Markets, George Stanciu, Politics|

I found Matthew Summers’ critique of my essay “Capitalism and the Gospel of Love” illuminating in the sense that two serious thinkers can look at the same phenomenon from completely different viewpoints. He seeks to show that capitalism is the best economic system; given capitalism, I seek to understand how to live best; he focuses [...]

A Theology of Gift: The Divine Benefactor and Universal Kinship

By |2018-12-10T15:46:15-05:00December 9th, 2018|Categories: Christian Humanism, Christianity, Economics, Philosophy, Stratford Caldecott, Timeless Essays|

Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords our readers the opportunity to join Stratford Caldecott as he considers the divine nature of giving as explained by Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI. —W. Winston Elliott III, Publisher My topic is a theological appreciation of the notion of “gift”, and how this throws light on what something is, which [...]

In Defense of Capitalism

By |2018-12-16T23:14:07-05:00December 2nd, 2018|Categories: Adam Smith, Capitalism, Economic History, Economics, Free Markets, Ludwig von Mises|

The term capitalism has long been used by critics as a catch-all to denote a system replete with greed, indulgence, excess, and deprivation. It is easy to misinterpret self-interest as selfishness and write off capitalism and economics. But the truth of the matter is much more complicated… I find myself still scratching my head over George [...]

All Work & No Play: How Schools Are Crushing Our Kids

By |2018-11-28T01:09:26-05:00November 27th, 2018|Categories: Culture, Education, Free Markets, Liberal Arts, Liberal Learning|

We’re filling up so much of kids’ time with extracurriculars and studying that they don’t have time to play—and without play, it’s harder to develop the self-starter instincts and resilience of an entrepreneur… This election cycle, liberal Democrats are rallying around the idea of socialized higher education. Democratic socialist firebrand Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is leading [...]

How the Myth of the ‘Robber Barons’ Began––and Why It Persists

By |2018-11-07T20:40:48-05:00November 7th, 2018|Categories: Books, Capitalism, Communism, Economic History, Economics, Free Markets|

Capitalism Worked, But We Were Told It Didn’t We study history to learn from it. If we can discover what worked and what didn’t work, we can use this knowledge wisely to create a better future. Studying the triumph of American industry, for example, is important because it is the story of how the [...]

Economists Must Answer for More than Just Economics

By |2018-09-11T11:58:41-05:00September 11th, 2018|Categories: Books, Capitalism, Conservatism, Culture, Economic History, Economics, Free Markets, Wilhelm Roepke|

Romanticizing and moralistic contempt of the economy, including contempt of the impulses which move the market economy and the institutions which support it, must be as far from our minds as economism, materialism, and utilitarianism... Editor's Note: The following excerpt comes from Wilhelm Röpke's excellent book, A Humane Economy: The Social Framework of the Free Market, first published [...]

Do Americans Really Value Hard Work?

By |2018-09-03T00:46:49-05:00September 2nd, 2018|Categories: Character, Economics, Mark Malvasi, Modernity, Timeless Essays|

The tiresome cant about the work ethic notwithstanding, Americans do not celebrate, or even recognize, the dignity of labor. Although they profess to disdain both the idle rich and the idle poor, they do not at the same time esteem those who must work for a living, even as most count themselves among that number... [...]

Why We Need “Too Many” Firefighters

By |2019-03-19T15:58:39-05:00August 29th, 2018|Categories: American Republic, Civil Society, Community, Culture, Economics, Social Institutions|

Firefighters’ role in the perpetuation of the common good in American communities is significant, even in surprising and unexpected ways. At a time when America is suffering a decline in community service and volunteerism, we should be grateful for firefighters serving our communities in other ways… As wildfires rage across California, the state has once [...]

The Church and the Marketplace

By |2018-08-17T11:39:59-05:00August 18th, 2018|Categories: Catholicism, Economics, John Horvat|

I fear for the time when all vestiges of the Church are scrubbed from economy. Then there will be no more familial caregivers. The family will be reduced to a mere collection of selfish individuals. The moral law will be erased by the unbridled passions of frenetic markets… The adjective Catholic is rarely employed to [...]