Freedom vs. Free Trade

By |2020-02-10T15:41:27-06:00February 10th, 2020|Categories: Adam Smith, American Republic, Civilization, Economics, Free Trade, Joseph Pearce, Political Economy, Senior Contributors|

Can “free trade,” as understood by Adam Smith, bring peace among nations? Or does it just allow the strongest nations to become imperial powers? In answering these questions, we must keep in mind that Smith was an economist and not a prophet. In all normal civilisations the trader existed and must exist. But in [...]

We’re From the Government—and We’re Here to Help the Workers!

By |2020-01-23T12:01:53-06:00January 23rd, 2020|Categories: American Republic, David Deavel, Economics, Government, Journalism, Politics, Senior Contributors|

California’s AB-5 law severely limits the type of freelance work that people can do. Several other blue states, including New York and New Jersey, are considering some variation on this unintentionally harmful law. It would be nice if legislators aiming to help workers would recall the adage, “First, do no harm.” Is schadenfreude, the [...]

A Balanced Position on Tariffs and Protectionism

By |2020-01-05T21:38:41-06:00January 5th, 2020|Categories: American Republic, Economics, Free Trade, Morality, Political Economy, Virtue|

The trade war has ignited debate on the merits of tariffs and the need to protect the nation’s manufacturing base. Battle lines are drawn between an exaggerated localism that stresses self-sufficiency and a bloated globalism where products transit the Earth unhindered and markets alone rule. […]

Leisure the Basis of Labor

By |2019-12-25T23:08:57-06:00December 25th, 2019|Categories: American Republic, Books, David Deavel, Economics, Labor/Work, Senior Contributors|

Michael Naughton’s new book, “Getting Work Right,” is a wonderful invitation to share a vision of work that goes beyond resume obsession or Thank-God-It’s-Friday attitudes. It’s an invitation to Thank God It’s Sunday and keep thanking all week long. Getting Work Right: Labor and Leisure in a Fragmented World, by Michael J. Naughton (200 [...]

The Business of America: The New Economy of the 1920s

By |2019-12-22T22:10:11-06:00December 22nd, 2019|Categories: American Republic, Economic History, Economics, History, Mark Malvasi, Senior Contributors|

The new economy that emerged after 1921 seemed to relegate to the past such painful depressions as the one that troubled the United States during the immediate postwar years.  As the 1920s drew to a close, however, the movement toward a new economy was about to encounter impediments that made a mockery of efforts to [...]

Chick-fil-A, the Mob, and the Bible’s Ananias

By |2019-12-20T00:02:31-06:00December 19th, 2019|Categories: Conservatism, Culture War, David Deavel, Economics, Politics, Senior Contributors|

Chick-fil-A’s decision to stop donating to the Salvation Army and the Fellowship of Christian Athletes last month was met with a lot of anger on the part of conservatives and Christians because it was seen as a betrayal of a large portion of its customer base, many of whom were fans of the place [...]

A Jeffersonian Model of Citizenship

By |2019-12-18T16:59:48-06:00December 18th, 2019|Categories: American Founding, American Republic, Citizen, Citizenship, Civil Society, Labor/Work, Liberal Learning, Thomas Jefferson|

The assumptions linked to the more deliberative, publicly responsible model of citizenship, though utopian and far-fetched at least within the perspective of modern, western society, can be thought of in a way that makes them seem more practical. Thomas Jefferson, for example, believed both that good government was possible only when those who governed [...]

The Business of America: Economy and Society During the 1920s

By |2019-12-22T22:12:18-06:00November 24th, 2019|Categories: American Republic, Economic History, Economics, History, Mark Malvasi, Senior Contributors|

During the 1920s, America made the first excursion into mass affluence in the history of the world. However, the ethic of consumption that reached its apex in the 1920s fomented a subtle transformation not only of the American economy but also of American culture. I Long considered the haven of corrupt public officials and [...]

Globalization and Our National Anomie

By |2019-11-07T12:43:02-06:00November 10th, 2019|Categories: American Republic, Civilization, Economics, Modernity, Politics|

Technocrats and cosmopolitan politicians are abetting globalization for political influence, economic gain, and utopian delusion. We might add another incentive: A forgotten or deliberately ignored reverence for civic life. Might a hyper-focus on global advancement be contributing to a growing state of national anomie in liberal democracies worldwide? Globalization has become an ineluctable reality. [...]

Some Vagaries and Evagaries of Avarice

By |2019-11-06T22:25:47-06:00November 6th, 2019|Categories: American Republic, David Deavel, Economics, Ethics, Morality, Senior Contributors, Virtue|

Avarice brings to mind the image of a hoarder—one who simply wants things for himself. However, while wanting more of something is certainly one side of avarice, it might not be the most important side. The image that always comes to mind for me when thinking about the vice of greed, or avarice, is [...]

Is Capitalism Intrinsically Woke?

By |2019-10-28T00:01:51-05:00October 27th, 2019|Categories: American Republic, Capitalism, David Deavel, Distributism, Economics, Senior Contributors|

Is capitalism itself intrinsically “woke”? In “The Distributist” column in the latest issue of the American Chesterton Society’s magazine, Gilbert (for which I am a contributing editor), John Howting argues that “ ‘Woke Capitalism’ is Capitalism.”[1] It’s a rather odd claim since “capitalists” are often accused of wanting “unfettered markets” in which the only [...]

Saint John Henry Newman, Sacramental Economist

By |2019-11-08T15:26:00-06:00October 12th, 2019|Categories: Catholicism, Christianity, David Deavel, Economics, Senior Contributors, St. John Henry Newman, Virtue|

John Henry Newman wished people to flee from the love of money, but he didn’t wish them to stop making it. He wished them to flee similarly from love of erudition for its own sake, but he didn’t want them to stop loving the Lord with mind as well as heart, soul, and strength. [...]

Matthew Peterson’s Not-So-Modest Proposal on Student Debt

By |2019-10-07T23:25:08-05:00October 6th, 2019|Categories: David Deavel, Economics, Education, Politics, Senior Contributors|

Everybody agrees student loan debt is a large problem. In the United States approximately $1.5 trillion is currently owed by around 45 million people at an average of over $32,000 per borrower. While relatively few borrowers owe more than $75,000, that relatively few includes over 4 million people. Another 24 million borrowers owe more [...]