Culture

Why We Play: Football Coaches & the Making of Boys Into Men

By |2019-11-20T13:58:28-06:00November 21st, 2019|Categories: Culture, David Deavel, Football, Senior Contributors, Sports, Virtue|

The coach insists on his team’s behavior as gentlemen. He insists that they work hard in practice no matter how much playing time they’re getting. And he insists that they see that whether they’re playing a lot or not, whether the position is glorious or not, they understand their work is part of a [...]

The Silent Witness of “Metropolis”

By |2019-11-22T02:36:59-06:00November 21st, 2019|Categories: Christianity, Culture, Dystopia, Film, Modernity, Religion|

A remnant from the late ‘20s, “Metropolis” has come into the light once again and in a more complete way. While the industrial environment and modern work have changed, the concern for social justice and questions about technology are just as intense as they were when the film premiered. In a search for movies [...]

The Crucifixion and Resurrection of Truth

By |2019-11-16T21:13:52-06:00November 16th, 2019|Categories: Beauty, Books, Culture, Joseph Pearce, Permanent Things, Senior Contributors, Truth|

Books are liberating. Not all books, to be sure. Not the sort of books that are as bad as the fads they serve, the sort of books in which vanity vanquishes verity, and in which the passion for fashion crucifies truth. Not the sort of books that turn their readers into prisoners of the [...]

Berlioz’s “Te Deum” & Chateaubriand’s “Genius of Christianity”

By |2019-11-15T10:00:33-06:00November 13th, 2019|Categories: Christianity, Hector Berlioz, Hector Berlioz Sesquicentennial Series, Michael De Sapio, Music|

Hector Berlioz's version of the "Te Deum" surpasses them all in its colossal scale. The French composer has often been accused of bombast, but here the gigantic forces required are completely fitting for this cosmic hymn of praise. “[I]t was enthusiasm itself that inspired the Te Deum...[A]mid clouds of smoke and yet reeking blood, a [...]

“Chasin’ Wild Horses”

By |2019-11-14T11:35:32-06:00November 12th, 2019|Categories: Audio/Video, Bruce Springsteen, Music|

Bruce Springsteen's "Chasin' Wild Horses" was released on his 2019 album "Western Stars," a set of songs told from the viewpoint of an older man, about remembrance, regret, and the search for redemption in the American West. The album marks a musical departure for Mr. Springsteen, as it features a classical chamber orchestral and a [...]

Return of the Strong Gods

By |2019-11-09T22:04:01-06:00November 9th, 2019|Categories: Books, Culture, Dwight Longenecker, Faith, Family, Senior Contributors, Western Civilization, Worldview|

R.R. Reno in “Return of the Strong Gods” argues that we need a return to the pillars that represent classic human values: the home, the country, and the religion. He calls for true patriotism rather than nationalism, marriage and family instead of a sexual free-for-all, and historic Christianity instead of do-it-yourself “spirituality.” Return of [...]

Heroes of the Fourth Turning

By |2019-11-09T22:14:08-06:00November 9th, 2019|Categories: Catholicism, Culture, Glenn Arbery, Senior Contributors, Worldview, Wyoming Catholic College|

Will Arbery’s “Heroes of the Fourth Turning” is intelligently written, beautifully directed, well-acted, and gripping from the very first scenes. Certainly, it’s a play that demands extended conversation. When I told my wife that I was going to be writing this week about our son Will’s play, Heroes of the Fourth Turning, she asked me if [...]

Why Pop Music Is So Bad These Days

By |2019-11-08T00:24:55-06:00November 7th, 2019|Categories: Education, Music|

Today’s pop music is designed to sell, not inspire. Today’s pop artist is often more concerned with producing something familiar to mass audience, increasing the likelihood of commercial success. With less timbral variety, and the same combination of keyboard, drum machine, and computer software, and with only two songwriters writing much of what we hear, [...]

“Concrete” Poetry and the Fall of Metaphor

By |2019-11-04T14:23:02-06:00November 6th, 2019|Categories: Culture, Literature, Modernity, Poetry, Tradition|

Central to classical poetry is the concept of metaphor—metaphor not simply as a rhetorical device, but metaphor as central to the poem itself. Such use of metaphor is absent from modernist poetry. In a worldview that denies absolute truth outright or at least its knowability, nothing exists for metaphor to reveal. In my last [...]

What is the Meaning of ‘Modest Fashion Week’?

By |2019-11-03T20:09:41-06:00November 3rd, 2019|Categories: Civil Society, Civilization, Culture, Modernity|

Given the overwhelming rule of liberal fashion, modesty would seem a lost cause. Nonetheless, major fashion designers are returning to what was once considered a modern taboo: clothing that leaves more to the imagination, keeps hemlines down and little skin exposed. When you hear the term “modest fashion,” you think of clothing linked to [...]

Debating the Benedict Option

By |2019-11-01T22:22:30-06:00November 1st, 2019|Categories: Books, Christian Living, Christianity, Culture, Senior Contributors, St. Benedict, Thomas R. Ascik|

Rod Dreher’s book, “The Benedict Option,” has gone on to become an international cultural event. Yet, today, it is not clear whether the book has had any influence on Church institutions and leadership. Has the Benedict Option then been a failure? Should other “options” be considered? Rod Dreher’s book The Benedict Option, a New [...]

The “Confessions” of Bruce Springsteen: “Western Stars,” the Film

By |2019-11-14T13:16:29-06:00October 31st, 2019|Categories: Bruce Springsteen, Film, Music, Stephen M. Klugewicz|

Bruce Springsteen's unrivaled stage presence comes across remarkably well in the film "Western Stars," as he performs his recent album in its entirety. But it is the brief, meditative, and confessional vignettes he uses to introduce each song that reveal just how much the entire album serves as his own version of St. Augustine's "Confessions." [...]