“Mr. Smith Goes to Washington”: Rebuilding Moral Community

By |2020-10-21T16:31:26-05:00October 21st, 2020|Categories: Civil Society, Community, Film|

The struggle between good and evil that Frank Capra depicts in "Mr. Smith" is clearly understood by viewers as reflecting timeless truths about citizenship and living together in a free society. Even in the fractured public square we inhabit today, members of opposing political tribes can recognize our common humanity in the heroic and humble [...]

The Arrogant Imperialism of the European Union

By |2020-10-19T15:57:41-05:00October 19th, 2020|Categories: Culture, Europe, Joseph Pearce, Politics, Senior Contributors|

There is no real difference between conservative and liberal imperialism in terms of the pride which animates it and the presumption which expects primitive cultures “to submit without protest” to those who are their “enlightened” betters. It’s not about right and left but about right and wrong—and imperialism, in whatever political guise, is wrong. [...]

The Plague of Multiculturalism: Russell Kirk’s “America’s British Culture”

By |2020-10-15T16:40:58-05:00October 18th, 2020|Categories: Culture, England, Featured, Roger Scruton, Russell Kirk|Tags: |

There is so much pertinent history and so much wisdom in Russell Kirk’s “America’s British Culture” that his book would serve as a useful summary of America and its culture for the busy student—even for one who is hard pressed by the demands of a multicultural curriculum. America’s British Culture, by Russell Kirk (New [...]

The Age of the Mask

By |2020-10-16T11:38:24-05:00October 18th, 2020|Categories: Coronavirus, Culture, Humor, Modernity|

During this “age of the mask,” are we on the verge of becoming a people who ritualistically carry masks with us wherever we go? Will it perhaps become generally understood that the wise person always keeps two masks with him at all times? Now that we have seemingly settled into the “age of the [...]

“The World Turned Upside Down”

By |2020-10-16T11:37:49-05:00October 16th, 2020|Categories: American Revolution, Audio/Video, Music|

The World Turned Upside Down" is an English ballad. It was first published on a broadside in the middle of the 1640s as a protest against the policies of Parliament relating to the celebration of Christmas. Parliament believed the holiday should be a solemn occasion, and outlawed traditional English Christmas celebrations. There are several versions [...]

When Bad Composers Do Good Things

By |2020-10-15T15:30:00-05:00October 15th, 2020|Categories: Music|

As a composer myself, I personally like the metaphor that my works are my children. In fact, they are my grown children, separate people, out of my house and entirely responsible for themselves now. Don’t blame me for them! And don’t blame them for me, either. No, my title does not refer to good people [...]

Columbus the Exemplar

By |2020-10-12T12:18:54-05:00October 11th, 2020|Categories: Christendom, Culture, History, Leadership, RAK, Russell Kirk, Timeless Essays|

Christopher Columbus offers us the example of those virtues that the old Romans called fortitude and constancy; and the example of those virtues that the early Christians called faith and hope. Half a millennium ago, a Genoese navigator with three caravels and Spanish crews groped his way among the islands of the Caribbean. Thus [...]

The Mystique of Late Beethoven

By |2020-10-09T08:54:26-05:00October 8th, 2020|Categories: Beethoven 250, Ludwig van Beethoven, Michael De Sapio, Music|

Beethoven's late style was not a total break from what came before. Many things touted as revolutionary are really, when seen in proper perspective, evolutionary. Beethoven’s late period intensifies qualities inherent in all his previous work. It is filled with music that is warm-hearted, impassioned, and of breathtaking beauty. “The music is not pretty or [...]

The Virtue of Irrelevance

By |2020-10-06T11:53:12-05:00October 7th, 2020|Categories: Culture, Education, Featured, Music, Philosophy, Roger Scruton, Timeless Essays|

If we know what music is, we have a duty to help young people to understand it, regardless of its “relevance.” We should do this as it has always been done, through encouraging our students to make music together. How many writers, educators, and opinion formers, urgently wishing to convey the thoughts and feelings [...]

On Nightmares, Crowds, and Getting It Wrong

By |2020-10-06T16:49:03-05:00October 6th, 2020|Categories: Culture, Music, Nature, Philosophy, St. Thomas Aquinas|

If the universe were a swarm, there would be no universe. That swarm, that self-caused changing unit, that Godless movable infinite thing would destroy the necessary condition of its own existence and persistence: the individuals that constitute it. Why, then, does modern man insist on not seeing this? Why does he choose rage over reality? [...]

Ten Truths of Christian Humanist Theology

By |2020-09-30T15:10:04-05:00October 3rd, 2020|Categories: Bradley J. Birzer, Christian Humanism, Christianity, Senior Contributors, Theology|

1. Theology is often the study of what we do not know. In theology, it is easier to disprove than to prove. Therefore, we begin by studying what we know and what we do not know. Once we have ruled out the incorrect, there is significant room for agreement, disagreement, and exploration within what [...]

A Call to the Joy of Life: Why Beethoven’s Ninth Matters to Me

By |2020-09-28T17:13:06-05:00September 28th, 2020|Categories: Audio/Video, Beethoven 250, Ludwig van Beethoven, Music, Timeless Essays|

For me, Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony will be forever linked to my life as a Bosnian refugee. In a time of great suffering, this music brought me hope. No amount of ideological nonsense will destroy its inherent beauty and its constant call for the restoration of humanity’s greatness. Western civilization and culture have been under [...]

Pietas and Fallen Cities: America and Vergil’s “Aeneid”

By |2020-09-28T00:48:46-05:00September 27th, 2020|Categories: Aeneid, American Republic, Civilization, Culture, Great Books, Religion, Virgil, Virtue|

Authentic righteousness for a nation of natives, settlers, immigrants, and refugees requires the same whether for America or Vergil’s Rome: pietas. This is devotion to family, community, country, and deity. One so devoted does not fear the sublimation of the self in the fulfillment of these duties, for it is in the pursuit of [...]

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