Constitution

Donald Trump and Religious Liberty

By |2020-01-20T17:00:02-06:00January 20th, 2020|Categories: American Founding, American Republic, Constitution, Government, Liberalism, Politics, Religion, Republicanism|

Many of America’s founders defended religious liberty, believing it grounded on the duty men and women have to worship their Creator. As late as the 1990s, Democrats and Republicans were able to work together to protect that liberty, but unfortunately, the political left has begun to abandon religious freedom. As the 2020 presidential campaign [...]

A Malicious Impeachment

By |2020-01-21T11:40:12-06:00January 16th, 2020|Categories: Constitution, Donald Trump, Pat Buchanan, Politics|

About the impeachment of President Donald Trump she engineered with her Democratic majority, Nancy Pelosi said Wednesday: "It's not personal. It's not political. It's not partisan. It's patriotic." Seriously, Madam Speaker? Not political? Not partisan? Why then were all eight House members chosen as managers to prosecute the case against Trump, who ceremoniously escorted the [...]

“Poison Under Its Wings”: The Constitution and Its Defects

By |2020-01-01T00:00:05-06:00January 1st, 2020|Categories: Alexander Hamilton, American Founding, American Republic, Constitution, Freedom, Patrick Henry|

The plan for government that came from the Philadelphia convention was what Patrick Henry referred to as a beautiful butterfly with “poison under its wings.” The parchment barriers erected against monarchy and consolidation, he held, would only be as effective as the force backing them. The beginning of the American political order goes much [...]

What Is the Constitution For?

By |2019-09-16T22:02:44-06:00September 16th, 2019|Categories: American Founding, American Republic, Bruce Frohnen, Constitution, Founding Document, Rights, Senior Contributors, Timeless Essays|

The U.S. Constitution is important, and great, precisely because it recognizes that people and their rights are social by nature, and must remain rooted in their communities if we are to enjoy the benefits of ordered liberty under the rule of law. Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords our readers the opportunity [...]

The Coups Against the Constitution

By |2019-09-16T22:10:49-06:00September 16th, 2019|Categories: American Republic, Constitution, Constitution Day, Paul Krause|

September 17 is Constitutional Day. The conservative establishment will undoubtedly write platitudes to the Constitution, thus creating the illusion that our government still abides by it. It is true that Alexis de Tocqueville observed that the Constitution was the best-crafted document in the world. But that document crafted by the Founding Fathers and eulogized [...]

The 10th Amendment: A Clear, Firm Boundary Between Congress & the States

By |2019-09-13T00:05:00-06:00September 12th, 2019|Categories: 10th Amendment, American Founding, American Republic, Constitution, History|

To introduce a Bill of Rights for the protection of states’ legislative powers was to protect expressly the rights of the people from intrusion by the general government into their liberty. Unfortunately, initial fears about the reach of federal power and the erosion of state sovereignty have come true. A recurrent theme during the [...]

How Can the Constitution Survive?

By |2019-08-26T00:42:13-06:00August 25th, 2019|Categories: American Founding, American Republic, Aristotle, Constitution, History, Timeless Essays|

It is essential that each new generation understand the meaning of the United States Constitution. Without an adequate understanding of the Constitution’s moral and cultural prerequisites, Democrats and Republicans will lack the moral and imaginative qualities necessary to cooperate; hence free government, which is dependent on inner ethical control, will be imperiled. Today’s offering [...]

Publius on the Relation of the Federal Government to the States

By |2019-11-12T15:11:10-06:00August 8th, 2019|Categories: American Founding, American Republic, Constitution, Federalist Papers, Government, History, James Madison, Politics|

James Madison wrote in “The Federalist” that the Constitution puts the states to the test: The stronger federal government will inaugurate a kind of competition in good government, breaking the states’ monopolies… Having founded republican regimes in America, regimes animated by respect for the laws of Nature and of Nature’s God as enunciated in [...]

Colorado’s Enduring Constitutional Heritage

By |2019-11-27T14:07:10-06:00July 31st, 2019|Categories: American Republic, Constitution, Constitutional Convention, Government, Politics|

The Colorado Constitution remains one of the longest state constitutions, reflective of Coloradans’ inclination to instruct their government in exactly what it should do and cannot do. They knew they did not want a “do-nothing” government. The 1876 Colorado Constitution contains the strongest declaration of state’s rights of any American constitution: “The people of [...]

New York’s Admission to the Union

By |2019-07-25T22:07:51-06:00July 25th, 2019|Categories: Alexander Hamilton, American Founding, American Republic, Constitution, History, John Jay|

New York showed its wealth of wisdom in ratifying the Constitution and becoming the 11th state in a fledgling nation. While the Empire State’s ratification was not required under the new Constitution for there to be a United States, had the vote gone the other way, the United States may have been for naught [...]

We Hold These Truths: Thoughts on the U.S. Constitution

By |2019-11-14T14:53:37-06:00July 15th, 2019|Categories: Audio/Video, Constitution, St. John's College|

Editor's Note: What is the duty of government? What are the rights of man in a civilized society? What is the purpose of law? Mortimer Adler, scholar of, and advocate for, the Great Books, attempts to answer these questions and more in the following interview. Interposed with scenes of discussion from a seminar conducted at [...]

The Declaration of Independence: Translucent Poetry

By |2019-07-03T21:24:51-06:00July 3rd, 2019|Categories: American Founding, Constitution, Declaration of Independence, E.B., Eva Brann, In Honor of Eva Brann at 90 Series, James Madison, Samuel Adams, St. John's College, Thomas Jefferson|

The Declaration of Independence, intended as an expression of the common opinion, is truly a text of "right opinion," a benign practical text which also has a peculiarly sound relation to the realm of thought. Section I:  The Legacy of the Declaration When American schoolchildren first discover that they have a place in the world they [...]