Finding the Center

By |2020-04-02T15:30:26-05:00April 2nd, 2020|Categories: Coronavirus, Glenn Arbery, Imagination, Literature, Poetry, Senior Contributors, Wyoming Catholic College|

No one knows what will happen with COVID-19—whether it will spread and peak and go away, or whether it will stay around for years, even centuries, as the plague did in Europe. It is good nonetheless to remember that true culture arises out of the joy and beauty we find anyway in the midst [...]

“After a Hundred Years”

By |2020-03-28T17:53:47-05:00March 28th, 2020|Categories: Poetry|

After a hundred years Nobody knows the place,— Agony, that enacted there, Motionless as peace. Weeds triumphant ranged, Strangers strolled and spelled At the lone orthography Of the elder dead. Winds of summer fields Recollect the way,— Instinct picking up the key Dropped by memory. The Imaginative Conservative applies the principle of appreciation to the discussion of [...]

On the Anniversary of Goethe’s Death

By |2020-03-22T14:47:26-05:00March 21st, 2020|Categories: Culture, History, Literature, Poetry|

The decline of literature indicates the decline of a nation  —Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832) remains Germany’s most popular poet and arguably its best alongside Friedrich Schiller.[1] Born in Frankfurt into a bourgeois upper-middle-class family, he spent his early years as a leading voice in the Romantic literary movement known [...]

A Case for Context: Horace’s “Ars Poetica”

By |2020-03-11T13:23:43-05:00March 11th, 2020|Categories: Christine Norvell, Imagination, Literature, Poetry, Senior Contributors|

In ancient times and modern, theories of poetry interpretation abound. By Aristotle’s standards, poetry aptly portrays tragedy. Plato equates poetry with art and demeans it as imitation, as lesser importance, because it is reflection not reality. As a successful poet in the first century, Horace not only proffers advice on how to write poetry, [...]

“Spirits of the Dead”

By |2020-03-10T11:37:48-05:00March 10th, 2020|Categories: Death, Edgar Allan Poe, Poetry|

1 Thy soul shall find itself alone 'Mid dark thoughts of the grey tomb-stone — Not one, of all the crowd, to pry Into thine hour of secrecy: 2 Be silent in that solitude ⁠Which is not loneliness—for then The spirits of the dead who stood ⁠In life before thee are again In death around [...]

The Deep Power of Joy

By |2020-03-07T11:03:54-06:00March 7th, 2020|Categories: Culture, Education, George Stanciu, Nature, Poetry, Senior Contributors, Wyoming Catholic College|

Wordsworth’s introspection in “Tintern Abbey” leads him to attempt to answer the question we ask with our curriculum at our college: How does the experience of unforgettable natural beauty in the full vitality of youth affect the moral and spiritual life that follows? As all the world should know, the curriculum at Wyoming Catholic [...]

Donald Davidson: The Poet as Citizen

By |2020-02-28T15:58:33-06:00February 28th, 2020|Categories: Agrarianism, Donald Davidson, Literature, Poetry, Politics, South, Southern Agrarians|

It may be true that Donald Davidson went too far in his concern for art’s effect on the community. Given the decadence of much popular and highbrow art in our time, perhaps other readers of Davidson’s verse find themselves in a curious predicament. Like me, they may find fault with the principles of his [...]

T.S. Eliot and Reconversion on Ash Wednesday

By |2020-02-25T22:13:35-06:00February 25th, 2020|Categories: Ash Wednesday, Christianity, Faith, Imagination, Literature, Poetry, T.S. Eliot|

T.S. Eliot’s “Ash-Wednesday” helps us to consider our earthly transience, just as Ash Wednesday reminds us of this same fact that our time on earth is passing. Nel mezzo del cammin di nostra vita . . . There is something telling about man’s tendency to view his life as a journey, for journeys convey [...]

“Ballade of the New History”

By |2020-02-22T10:44:24-06:00February 23rd, 2020|Categories: Culture War, History, Imagination, Poetry|

They held a meeting and they said They could no longer tolerate His portrait peering down while they were fed With college food and facts that led to hate; Quite frankly, there’d be no debate – And as to motive, there would be no mystery; They wouldn’t burn it, but they’d put it in [...]