Chesterton and the Meaning of Education

By |2021-01-26T14:34:46-06:00January 26th, 2021|Categories: Christian Humanism, Education, G.K. Chesterton, Joseph Pearce, Senior Contributors|

The anti-religious spirit of modernity is so antagonistic to the idea of a unifying truth that it prefers a meaningless education to an education informed by the underlying meaning inherent in the truth-claims of religion or philosophy. And this, according to G.K. Chesterton, is not really education at all. “It is typical of our [...]

Arguing With Dante and Milton

By |2021-01-24T16:11:49-06:00January 24th, 2021|Categories: Christianity, Dante, Great Books, John Milton, Joseph Pearce, Senior Contributors|

I disagree on certain points with two literary giants, Dante and John Milton. Though unworthy to follow in their literary footsteps, I feel nonetheless that even giants are fallible. Is it possible to argue without quarreling? G.K. Chesterton thought so and did so. He said of his relationship with his brother that they were [...]

Rod Dreher and The Nostalgia Option

By |2021-01-23T19:01:56-06:00January 23rd, 2021|Categories: Books, Conservatism, Culture, Dwight Longenecker, Politics, Senior Contributors|

As techno-totalitarianism really gets into gear, it is up to each one of us to root our lives, our homes, our schools, and our parishes in the eternal values of the Christian faith and classical learning—and we need to do so with imagination and realism, avoiding the temptation to become nostalgic dreamers. Live Not [...]

Living at This Hour

By |2021-01-22T09:54:37-06:00January 22nd, 2021|Categories: Glenn Arbery, Government, John Milton, Literature, Poetry, Senior Contributors, Wyoming Catholic College|

Even without the content of the general historical frame, William Wordsworth’s sonnet, “London 1802,” is moving to every generation that reads it, and it is natural to compare our current political situation with the one described in the poem. All of us, of course, remember the dire circumstances of England in 1802. No? Then [...]

Reflections on Imaginative Conservatism

By |2021-01-21T12:00:41-06:00January 21st, 2021|Categories: Conservatism, E.B., Essential, Eva Brann, Imagination, In Honor of Eva Brann at 90 Series, St. John's College, The Imaginative Conservative|

My first and last care is not politics but education. Education seems to me inherently conservative, being the transmission, and thus the saving, of a tradition’s treasures of fiction and thought. But education is also inherently imaginative. Author’s Note: I wish to dedicate this essay to a writer of books whose greatness is at [...]

Sensing the Dangers of Romantic Sensibility

By |2021-01-18T12:09:46-06:00January 19th, 2021|Categories: Great Books, Jane Austen, Literature, Love, Paul Krause, Reason, Senior Contributors|

“Sense and Sensibility” is a profound achievement of romantic realism. Jane Austen demonstrates that to surrender oneself to romantic sensibility is the highway to ruin, but that the unity of logos and eros is beautiful and wholesome. Jane Austen, to my mind, was the preeminent romantic realist writer. Born into a modest clerical family, [...]

Impeachment Inferno: Can President Trump Be Tried After Leaving Office?

By |2021-01-20T11:07:40-06:00January 18th, 2021|Categories: Constitution, Donald Trump, Presidency, Thomas R. Ascik|

In passing its resolution impeaching President Donald Trump just seven days before he leaves office, the House of Representatives has embarked on a new American legal, constitutional, political, and historical journey. An End Without a Means In its political haste to impeach President Trump, the House Democratic majority (along with ten Republicans) decided that an [...]

James Otis, Then and Now

By |2021-01-18T15:38:58-06:00January 18th, 2021|Categories: American Founding, American Republic, Bradley J. Birzer, History, Politics, Rights, Senior Contributors|

Going back to the first principles of the Founding, one finds that the Founders talked unceasingly about rights. Rights language became a critical part of the cultural landscape when James Otis delivered his oration on the nature of rights, the common law, and the natural law. Feel free to call me a conservative (I [...]

Which Way Is Heaven?

By |2021-01-18T10:13:01-06:00January 17th, 2021|Categories: Heaven, Joseph Pearce, Senior Contributors|

Which way is heaven? For those of us who are keen to get there, this is an important question; indeed, a crucial one. Do we look up at the twinkling stars, wondering what they are in childlike contemplation? Is this assent to the innocence of wonder the ascent to heaven, or the necessary prerequisite [...]

Robert Nisbet’s Mentor: Frederick Teggart

By |2021-01-14T15:58:26-06:00January 15th, 2021|Categories: Bradley J. Birzer, History, Robert Nisbet, Senior Contributors|

Robert Nisbet was greatly influenced by his professor Frederick Teggart and his many ideas. Teggart was a brilliant scholar and historian, one of University of California Berkeley’s most successful lecturers, and “an impressive stretcher of minds.” “I have met no one since then who has approached him in range, diversity, and depth of knowledge,” [...]

Furies: The Myopia of the Present Moment

By |2021-01-15T16:52:37-06:00January 15th, 2021|Categories: Civilization, Classics, Glenn Arbery, Great Books, Senior Contributors, Wyoming Catholic College|

Turning away from the news and attending with imagination to the “Oresteia” takes faith, both in God and in the wisdom of our forebears. This will be a worthier endeavor, both for the present moment and for the time to come, than trying to tear down the very structures that give us the promise [...]

Ways to Fight Big Tech

By |2021-01-15T10:52:54-06:00January 14th, 2021|Categories: David Deavel, Information Age, Senior Contributors, Technology|

The social-media giants won't stop censoring conservative speech anytime soon. Why would they? The reality is that conservatives must fight back against big tech immediately. Here are several ways to do it. Will you see this essay on Facebook or Twitter? Maybe, maybe not. The two major social media networks have been censoring political speech [...]

The Fine Art of the Essay

By |2021-01-13T15:01:11-06:00January 13th, 2021|Categories: Books, Culture, Michael De Sapio, Senior Contributors, Writing|

Joseph Epstein’s life and writing exemplify the ideal essay writer’s tendency to be a humane generalist rather than an academic specialist. Aiming at well-roundedness, the essayist also becomes freed from vogue words and jargon, a bad influence against which Mr. Epstein campaigns vigorously and wittily in “Gallimaufry: A Collection of Essays, Reviews, Bits.” Gallimaufry: [...]

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