All Is Not Lost: Reason, Faith, & Western Civilization

By |2019-07-20T21:36:39-05:00July 20th, 2019|Categories: Catholicism, Christendom, Christianity, Dwight Longenecker, Philosophy, Senior Contributors, Western Civilization|

Samuel Gregg’s “Reason, Faith, and the Struggle for Western Civilization” is a brilliant meditation on the reasons for the rise of the West, more triumphantly known as “Christendom.” He argues that for the West to survive, we must first acknowledge and then return to valuing its Christian foundation. But does history indicate that going [...]

Narnia on Stage

By |2019-07-19T17:01:45-05:00July 19th, 2019|Categories: Art, Beauty, C.S. Lewis, Christian Humanism, Culture, Joseph Pearce, Senior Contributors|

Although The Logos Theatre is a somewhat small apostolate, tucked away in the South, on the buckle of the Bible Belt, far from the madding crowds and the madness and mayhem of Broadway and Hollywood, it punches beyond its weight and, to switch metaphors, it lights candles of joy and beauty, dispelling with the [...]

World War I and the Inklings

By |2019-07-18T21:38:17-05:00July 18th, 2019|Categories: Bradley J. Birzer, C.S. Lewis, Christian Humanism, Inklings, J.R.R. Tolkien, Literature, Senior Contributors, War, World War I|

The Great War destroyed much the Inklings had held true, personally and culturally. Each lost friends, and each felt the guilt that any survivor of a war feels. Many of them refused to talk about their own experiences, for good or ill. J.R.R. Tolkien, perhaps, provides the best example. Though not the best-known Inkling, [...]

The Boston Classicists: America’s Pioneering Composers

By |2019-07-18T21:35:18-05:00July 18th, 2019|Categories: Culture, Michael De Sapio, Music, Senior Contributors|

Together, four men and one woman—the Boston Classicists—brought American music to a level of sophistication it had never had before. Not only did they become the most highly respected composers in America, but their music was also heard abroad to great applause. In her early years America had the reputation, at least among sophisticated [...]

The Moral Imagination & Imaginative Conservatism

By |2019-07-19T14:32:07-05:00July 17th, 2019|Categories: Books, E.B., Edmund Burke, Eva Brann, Imagination, In Honor of Eva Brann at 90 Series, Jane Austen, Moral Imagination, St. John's College|

Moral imagination runs not incidentally but necessarily in tandem with a certain aspect of conservatism, what I think of as imaginative conservatism… The Moral Imagination: From Edmund Burke to Lionel Trilling, by Gertrude Himmelfarb (259 pages, Ivan R. Dee, 2006) The Moral Imagination is a very engaging collection of a dozen essays on a dozen [...]

The Truth About Political Correctness

By |2019-07-17T00:57:31-05:00July 16th, 2019|Categories: Communio, Equality, Politics, Reason, Senior Contributors, Stratford Caldecott, Truth|

Political correctness is philosophical nonsense. What we need is Justice not just Equality, Moral Responsibility not just Freedom, Intelligence not just Reason, and Charity not just Niceness or Fraternity—even if these don’t sound so good on a banner. Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords our readers the opportunity to join Stratford Caldecott, [...]

Authors Who Shaped Me

By |2019-07-15T23:00:31-05:00July 15th, 2019|Categories: Books, Bradley J. Birzer, Imagination, Literature, Senior Contributors|

As a child, I spent my free time divided between two activities—exploring the environs in and around my hometown, and reading everything under the sun. Ranging from biography to high fantasy to rigorous logic, these books shaped my tastes, thoughts, and aspirations. Ever since attending first grade—at Wiley Elementary School in Hutchinson, Kansas—I’ve loved to [...]

“Dandelion Wine”: Awakening to the World

By |2019-07-15T22:52:09-05:00July 15th, 2019|Categories: Beauty, Books, Christine Norvell, Fiction, Literature, Nature, Ray Bradbury, Senior Contributors|

Dandelion Wine is a summer read if ever there was one. I know quite a few Ray Bradbury lovers who read it as a summer ritual, and for good reason. From the first moments when we meet Douglas Spaulding, we know his life is one of imagination and adventure. In Dandelion Wine, Doug is [...]

Photography as Propaganda

By |2019-07-16T11:20:36-05:00July 14th, 2019|Categories: Conservatism, Foreign Affairs, Immigration, Joseph Mussomeli, Modernity, Politics, Senior Contributors|

Images certainly can be much more compelling than mere words. But like words, how images are used and when they are used are opportunities for manipulation. The photograph is unnerving. One cannot look at it without it breaking your heart. It is the sort of image that sticks in your mind forever and haunts [...]

In Defense of the Humanities

By |2019-07-14T21:32:01-05:00July 14th, 2019|Categories: Culture, Great Books, Humanities, Liberal Learning, Paul Krause, Senior Contributors, Timeless Essays|

Any talk of saving culture, or restoring culture, begins with a defense of the humanities. Any hope of cultural revival equally begins with a re-emergence of the humanities. Any hope to truly celebrate—though not uncritically—the human person rests with being drenched in the dewfall of the humanities. Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series [...]

Does the “i” in iPhone Stand for “Idol”?

By |2019-07-11T19:00:40-05:00July 13th, 2019|Categories: Apple, Christianity, Culture, Dwight Longenecker, Science, Senior Contributors, Technology|

Instead of carved statues of Adonis or Venus, we have created for each person his own hand-held idol, designed with amazing ingenuity and carved with utmost skill from precious materials. Each one of us has a little god who offers us the world in the palm of our hand. While I was reading from [...]