Good Friday, Good Bureaucrats, and the Good Roman

By |2019-04-17T14:39:54-05:00April 18th, 2019|

On this Good Friday, as we ponder the suffering Christ endured, we should not forget the pivotal role of that good and decent bureaucrat Pilate in facilitating that crime. Nor forget the bureaucratic crimes committed daily on the sacrificial altars of obedience and expedience. Thus spoke Nietzsche: “Must I add that, in the whole [...]

John With Jesus: From Passover to the Garden of Gethsemane

By |2019-04-19T02:24:54-05:00April 17th, 2019|

Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords our readers the opportunity to join Barbara Elliott, as she portrays the events of the Last Supper to Jesus’ prayer in the Garden of Gethsemane from the perspective of the Apostle John. —W. Winston Elliott III, Publisher I went with Peter to make the arrangements for [...]

Virgil on Pietas

By |2019-04-16T22:08:10-05:00April 16th, 2019|

I’m glad to see that your age has not forgotten Rome. But please, children of the future, do not think that Rome was only a city or an empire or a people. She was also an idea, the noblest idea the world has ever known. And behind that idea was a single word: pietas. [...]

A Connecticut Yankee and the Failure of Progressivism

By |2019-04-15T23:19:15-05:00April 15th, 2019|

No writer so early recognized and so credibly exposed the dangerous inadequacies concealed in the Progressive world view than did Mark Twain in his sardonic novel A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court. I. By 1912, the triumph of Progressivism was complete. Both Woodrow Wilson and Theodore Roosevelt had advertised themselves as Progressive candidates, [...]

“Paradise Lost”: Hidden Meanings?

By |2019-04-15T17:24:41-05:00April 15th, 2019|

I keep having the sense that something is going on that runs right counter to the overt text of John Milton’s Paradise Lost. There seems to be a separate, opposed meaning. Should it be called a hidden agenda, a subtext? Milton’s Paradise Lost is a poem of such panoramic grandeur and such human acuteness [...]

Facebook Fascism and the Slippery Slope to Tyranny

By |2019-04-14T21:56:59-05:00April 14th, 2019|

Following the recent attack on a mosque in New Zealand by a white supremacist terrorist, I was asked by a national TV network in the UK to appear on a live show to give my perspective as a former white supremacist. (I served two prison sentences for “inciting racial hatred” back in the 1980s.) [...]

C.S. Lewis in the Deep South

By |2019-04-13T16:06:57-05:00April 13th, 2019|

With a dream, hard work, and real sacrifice, the good Christian people at Bob Jones University have created something beautiful and real. By creating Narnia onstage, they are captivating the imaginations of a new generation of children and sneaking them past the ever-watchful and increasingly dangerous dragons of secular materialism. When I left Bob [...]

Horseman and Poet

By |2019-04-14T16:26:48-05:00April 13th, 2019|

This morning, I had the privilege of speaking to the entire student body and faculty of Portsmouth Abbey School on the eastern shore of Narragansett Bay, nine or ten miles north of Newport, Rhode Island. My topic was “why literature matters,” but my emphasis was on the way that identity politics ruins both literature [...]

Percy Bysshe Shelley’s Spring Wisdom: “To a Skylark”

By |2019-04-10T22:35:52-05:00April 10th, 2019|

Appreciating poetry begins with finding poetry you like, poems you’re drawn to, poems that resonate and delight. Over the years, I’ve come to realize that I most enjoy the Romantics or those moderns who have a romantic flair. As the seasons change, and spring breaks from winter, I especially delight in the work of [...]

Aristophanes on Laughter

By |2019-04-09T22:59:20-05:00April 9th, 2019|

There are plenty of men who need to be taught virtue; plenty of pompous men who need to have their egos pricked, plenty of know-it-alls who need to be taken down a couple of notches. The best way to do that is through laughter. Author’s Introduction: Imagine if Homer, Virgil, Dante, Chaucer, and the other great [...]

Intellect and Intuition: Longing for Insight?

By |2019-04-08T17:39:56-05:00April 8th, 2019|

We say of people that they have intuition. We ap­parently mean that they apprehend things directly without belaboring them by analysis or even without accosting them with too close an inspection. Intuition is what we long for, thinking is what we can do. What follows? You asked me to speak about “Intellect and Intuition,” [...]

“The Betrothed”: The Greatest Novel Ever Written?

By |2019-04-09T01:37:15-05:00April 8th, 2019|

Editor’s Note: Exclusive to The Imaginative Conservative, this essay is a chapter on Allessandro Manzoni from Joseph Pearce’s forthcoming book, Literature: What Every Catholic Should Know. If the great masterpiece of Italian literature, Dante’s Divine Comedy, could realistically be acclaimed as the greatest poem ever written, the other great masterpiece of Italian literature, The Betrothed (I [...]

Coming Home: Tradition and My Hometown

By |2019-04-07T21:01:24-05:00April 7th, 2019|

The beauty of one’s home, neighborhood, and community is easy to forget, especially in an age as transient and rootless as ours. Yet, it’s in the quiet moments or on a historic occasion in your hometown that you are pulled back to consider the things that surround you. “Coming home” is an important process [...]

Tolkien, Lewis, and the Need for Literary Realism

By |2019-04-06T22:40:38-05:00April 6th, 2019|

J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis tempt us to escape to a self-evidently numinous world rather than to seek out the texture of wonder in this one. What we need is an unsparing literary realism—literature without recourse to fantasy, literature in which talking trees do not come to the rescue. It’s quiet at Wyoming Catholic [...]