“The Karate Kid” & the Merits of Authority-Based Discipleship

By |2021-04-16T10:56:48-05:00April 16th, 2021|Categories: Culture, Education, Film, Liberal Learning|

In the 1984 film “The Karate Kid,” Mr. Miyagi’s teaching method may seem scandalous to Western eyes: Either Daniel does things his way, or not at all. The wise mentor refuses to reveal to Daniel the reason for his menial exercises. But it is precisely the virtue of submission and obedience that is essential for [...]

Michelangelo’s “Sin”

By |2021-04-02T08:04:10-05:00April 10th, 2021|Categories: Art, Culture, Film|

Set in the period after the completion of the Sistine Chapel ceiling, the film, “Sin,” paints a rounded characterization of Michelangelo rather than the hoary cliché of the solitary misanthropic genius holed up in his studio. This episode of the artist’s career has never been so dramatically or so convincingly told. Il Peccato (Sin), the [...]

Revisiting Mel Gibson’s “Passion of the Christ”

By |2021-03-24T16:44:11-05:00March 27th, 2021|Categories: Christianity, Culture, Film, Joseph Pearce, Senior Contributors|

It is inadequate to describe Mel Gibson’s masterpiece, “The Passion of the Christ,” as a film; it is much more than that. It would be more accurate to describe it as a moving icon. It calls us to prayer and leads us to the contemplation that takes us into the presence of Christ Himself. It’s [...]

Moral Realism in Christmas Fantasy: “The Family Man”

By |2020-12-25T12:56:16-06:00December 25th, 2020|Categories: Christmas, Culture, David Deavel, Family, Film, Morality, Senior Contributors|

Just as the advent of the Savior at Christmastime did not eliminate the consequences of human sin and foolishness but opened a new way forward, so too the vision of Jack Campbell in “The Family Man” does not change his wasted last thirteen years but opens up the possibility of a very different future for [...]

Netflix’s “The Crown”: Diana, the Poor Little Princess

By |2020-12-18T16:19:05-06:00December 18th, 2020|Categories: Culture, Dwight Longenecker, England, Film, Senior Contributors|

Using dramatic license, “The Crown” features the romance between Charles, Prince of Wales, and his future queen. Though appearing to be in a sense a real-life Cinderella, Diana, Princess of Wales, is a kind of symbol of our dysfunctional modern Western society. We were living in England in 1997, when Diana, Princess of Wales, was [...]

It’s a Wonderful Sports Entertainment Life: “Fighting With My Family”

By |2020-11-18T14:03:01-06:00November 18th, 2020|Categories: Culture, David Deavel, Family, Film, Senior Contributors|

The 2019 film “Fighting With My Family,” though not life-changing, is a nice change of pace from the movies where doing one’s own thing is depicted as the heroic, authentic thing. It is pleasantly anti-modern in its conception of family and work, as the family’s good is portrayed as more important than self-doubts about “what [...]

“Raphael Revealed”: His Life and Influence

By |2020-11-04T16:29:31-06:00November 13th, 2020|Categories: Art, Culture, Film, History|

“Raphael Revealed” offers abundant opportunities to view an array of Raphael’s masterpieces up close in the context of the Rome of the early 16th century. One of the richest achievements of European art and culture once again becomes accessible and understandable. Exhibition on Screen, the long-running and highly popular series of high-definition documentary films about [...]

Larry Elder’s “Uncle Tom”: The Challenge for Black Conservatives

By |2020-10-30T15:21:57-05:00October 30th, 2020|Categories: American Republic, Conservatism, Culture, David Deavel, Film, Politics, Senior Contributors|

Larry Elder’s film “Uncle Tom” is a must-see for anybody who thinks all black people think alike or that American black history is simply a history of victimhood. They’re black, they’re proud, and they’re all-American—just like the film they’re in. While it is unlikely that blacks will vote as a majority for Donald Trump or [...]

“Mr. Smith Goes to Washington”: Rebuilding Moral Community

By |2020-10-22T11:13:54-05:00October 21st, 2020|Categories: Civil Society, Community, Film|

The struggle between good and evil that Frank Capra depicts in "Mr. Smith" is clearly understood by viewers as reflecting timeless truths about citizenship and living together in a free society. Even in the fractured public square we inhabit today, members of opposing political tribes can recognize our common humanity in the heroic and humble [...]

“Triumph of the Will”: The Culture of Death on Screen

By |2020-09-03T00:11:08-05:00September 3rd, 2020|Categories: Culture, Death, Europe, Film, History, War, World War II|

Commissioned by Adolf Hitler, “Triumph of the Will” is a terrifying film. It is as if, for a moment, something infernal took control of the camera and caused the audience to be entranced, as it projected a lie into Germany’s consciousness, and then beyond to an unwilling world. As a consequence, 85 million people were [...]

Redeeming Film Music From the Avant-Garde

By |2020-08-25T16:07:20-05:00August 25th, 2020|Categories: Featured, Film, Music, Roger Scruton, Timeless Essays|

Perhaps we should be grateful to John Williams and Howard Shore for showing us that we can still use the tonal language to create music that resonates in the hearts of ordinary people. Perhaps we should be suspicious of those musical censors who leap to dismiss whatever is spontaneously likeable as cliché, and whatever touches [...]

The Pro-Life Themes of Uberto Pasolini’s “Still Life”

By |2020-08-13T15:56:45-05:00August 13th, 2020|Categories: Beauty, Community, Culture, Death, Dwight Longenecker, Film, Senior Contributors|

Uberto Pasolini’s “Still Life” is a haunting, original, and moving tribute to human worth and self-sacrificial love at the street level. It is a beautiful, quiet film that packs an emotional and philosophical punch far beyond its weight. Always on the lookout for a film that is better than the formulaic, ideologically-driven entertainment that is [...]

Go to Top