Going Over Jordan: Images of Baptism in “1917”

By |2020-07-18T17:49:07-05:00July 18th, 2020|Categories: Christianity, Culture, Film, Literature, Poetry, War, World War I|

Sam Mendes’ appropriation of baptismal imagery allows the film “1917” to achieve the rare feat of portraying the First World War in terms of hope and rebirth rather than merely of pity and death. As we watch the protagonist Schofield’s journey, we recall that we have been buried and raised with Christ. I was [...]

The Economics of Marriage in Greta Gerwig’s “Little Women”

By |2020-06-09T09:57:01-05:00June 9th, 2020|Categories: Culture, Fiction, Film, Literature, Marriage|

Director Greta Gerwig’s film “Little Women” ends as Louisa May Alcott’s novel does, with a family-centered fall festival at Plumfield. Perhaps unintentionally, Ms. Gerwig captures the spirit of Alcott’s beautiful ending to her novel. Not only has she married off the heroine, but she has shown marriage to be far more than an economic [...]

Race Riots, Nietzsche, and “Django Unchained”

By |2020-06-08T16:48:44-05:00June 8th, 2020|Categories: Christianity, Culture, Dwight Longenecker, Film, Friedrich Nietzsche, Great Books, Senior Contributors|

During the last fifty years we have seen the cities of America crumble into race riots time and again. The problem of racism is solved by the way of the cross, by the way of the ordinary person who, filled with transcendent insight, sees a problem, owns it, then rolls up his sleeves to do [...]

“Memoriae Tuae”

By |2020-06-05T20:15:40-05:00June 5th, 2020|Categories: Audio/Video, Film, Music|

“Memoriae Tuae” Martis nec gladius, belli nec ignis impiger Vivum momentum unquam memoriae tuae consumet Nor Mars his sword nor war’s quick fire shall burn The living record of your memory* Patrick Doyle wrote "Memoriae Tuae" as part of his score for the animated film, Sgt. Stubby: An American Hero, a 2018 computer-animated adventure film [...]

“Baseball Has Marked the Time”

By |2020-05-16T13:36:23-05:00May 16th, 2020|Categories: Audio/Video, Baseball, Film|

The following is the speech of Terence Mann (played by James Earl Jones) from the film Field of Dreams. Ray, people will come, Ray. They'll come to Iowa for reasons they can't even fathom. They'll turn up your driveway, not knowing for sure why they're doing it. They'll arrive at your door as innocent as [...]

“Star Wars”: Identity, Love, and Redemption

By |2020-05-04T14:30:42-05:00May 4th, 2020|Categories: Film, Paul Krause, Senior Contributors|

Is Star Wars more than an entertaining space opera meant to relax us after the daily grind of post-industrialized life? To answer that question, we must consider the possibility of depth in cinema—that cinema is itself the vehicle for our post-technological mythology, manifesting our deepest fears as well as our subconscious and unconscious struggles. While [...]

1939’s “Stagecoach”: The Reign of Justice and Redemption

By |2020-03-13T17:39:48-05:00March 13th, 2020|Categories: American West, Bradley J. Birzer, Culture, Film, Morality, Senior Contributors|

In 1939, John Ford released Stagecoach, a learned and perceptive cinematic work of art that not only introduced John Wayne as a major player in Hollywood but one that also made the western something more than a mere backdrop for pulp-ish adventure stories. Indeed, the movie shows that the western can serve as the [...]

Little Women, J-Lo, and Eve

By |2020-02-14T12:58:25-06:00February 14th, 2020|Categories: Culture, Feminism, Film, Glenn Arbery, Senior Contributors, Wyoming Catholic College|

What are women? Despite my daily presence to my daughters’ lives, their sisterhood remains an enigma. A complex emotional bond exists among the seven of them, a self-enclosed feminine world that I can see and understand, but never truly enter. “Little Women” reminded me of that. What are women, anyway? I’m confused. Recent events, not to mention what [...]

Created Equal: Clarence Thomas In His Own Words

By |2020-07-23T14:17:45-05:00February 7th, 2020|Categories: American Republic, David Deavel, Film, Politics, Senior Contributors, Supreme Court|

One of the best contemporary memoirs I’ve read in the last decade is My Grandfather’s Son, which was published in 2007. In his tale that ended with the fierce 1991 confirmation battle for his seat on the U.S. Supreme Court, Clarence Thomas told a remarkable story of his journey from being raised by a [...]

They All Go Into the Dark: Martin Scorsese’s “The Irishman”

By |2020-02-07T16:05:52-06:00February 7th, 2020|Categories: Culture, Dwight Longenecker, Film, Senior Contributors|

Martin Scorsese is a master filmmaker. Believing a film can be an art form on a level with music, dance, and literature, the one-time seminarian director wrestles with themes of free will and the unforeseen consequences of sin in his latest work, “The Irishman.” Martin Scorsese recently criticized Hollywood’s current cash cow—the comic book [...]

“The Act of Killing”: Unquiet Graves and Troubled Consciences

By |2020-01-24T15:16:28-06:00January 30th, 2020|Categories: Communism, Culture, Fascism, Film, History, Politics, StAR|

A few years back, a film, The Act of Killing (2012), ran at a London cinema for 52 weeks. Such a run is unusual for any film: even more so for a documentary feature about Indonesia. The film’s subject matter revolves around one man, Anwar Congo, who is convivial, charming even, and with real [...]

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