Death on Drum: Gerard Manley Hopkins & the Mystery of Suffering

By |2021-02-12T15:38:30-06:00February 12th, 2021|Categories: Death, Gerard Manley Hopkins, Joseph Pearce, Literature, Poetry, Senior Contributors|

Prompted to compose his marvelous tour de force, “The Wreck of the Deutschland,” after reading the report of a shipwreck off the coast of England, the priest-poet Gerard Manley Hopkins gives one of the most profound and penetrating meditations on the mystery of suffering. The mystery of suffering, or the problem of pain as C.S. Lewis [...]

Euripides: Poet-Prophet of Pity

By |2021-02-03T16:32:16-06:00February 3rd, 2021|Categories: Death, Great Books, Paul Krause, Senior Contributors, Theater, War|

Responding to the great bloodshed of young men, women, and virgins he experienced during the Peloponnesian War, Euripides exposes the horrors of war and its damaging effects on humans, particularly on women, in his war plays. Euripides’s dramatic tragedies appeal to our sense of pity and call for peace. The acme of Euripides’s literary genius [...]

Coronavirus and Science Fiction: Dying With Drama

By |2020-12-18T16:20:56-06:00December 18th, 2020|Categories: Bradley J. Birzer, Coronavirus, Death, Literature, Senior Contributors|

In the year 793, Catholic monks made the following report, all of it disturbing: In this dire year portents appeared over Northumbria and sorely frightened the people. They consisted of immense whirlwinds and flashes of lightning, and fiery dragons were seen flying in the air. A great famine immediately followed those signs, and a little [...]

The Suicide of a Civilization

By |2020-12-09T15:59:46-06:00December 9th, 2020|Categories: Christianity, Civilization, Culture, Death|

Suppose an anthropologist were asked, apart from the sound and fury of current politics, what were the signs of a dying culture, or a culture committing suicide? What might he respond, as following from human nature and from the terms of the question itself? What might he notice in our own? Such a culture would [...]

Death and Transfiguration

By |2020-10-05T12:00:21-05:00November 1st, 2020|Categories: Books, Christianity, Death, Hope, Michael De Sapio, Philosophy, Senior Contributors|

Dealing with the topic of death, Dietrich von Hildebrand’s consoling book “Jaws of Death: Gate of Heaven” shines both in its “dark” and “light” halves, illuminating the eternal duality of human life and helping to reconcile its painful contradictions. Life is not a journey of diminishing returns, ending in darkness and the grave, but a [...]

Zombie Legends in the Age of Mass Man

By |2020-10-30T15:23:04-05:00October 30th, 2020|Categories: Culture, Death, Halloween, Imagination, Literature, Modernity, Myth|

Zombie legends remain a relevant medium that continues to capture the imaginations of modern people. As with any myth or legend, we gain wisdom about ourselves when we endeavor to unearth the symbolic meanings that lie buried beneath the surface. At times, what we find is as frightening as it is illuminating. With the Halloween [...]

Armenian Genocide and Bernard Lewis

By |2020-10-13T12:57:59-05:00October 14th, 2020|Categories: Death, Europe, Middle East, Truth|

The present bombing of Armenia and Artsakh is meant to fulfill the Young Turk dream of building an Empire. That dream is alive and well in Turkey’s government today. By honoring and listening to historian Bernard Lewis, we have become accomplices of that dream, that nightmare. It is time to wake up and hold fast [...]

A Second Armenian Genocide

By |2020-10-01T15:41:29-05:00October 1st, 2020|Categories: Death, Europe, Middle East, Politics, War|

One hundred and forty-two years after the Congress of Berlin, the same nightmarish scenario is playing out again: Turkish forces are killing Armenians. And like the Europeans of times past, we just don’t seem to get it. How many Armenians have to die before we understand that life and culture are precious and must be [...]

“Triumph of the Will”: The Culture of Death on Screen

By |2020-09-03T00:11:08-05:00September 3rd, 2020|Categories: Culture, Death, Europe, Film, History, War, World War II|

Commissioned by Adolf Hitler, “Triumph of the Will” is a terrifying film. It is as if, for a moment, something infernal took control of the camera and caused the audience to be entranced, as it projected a lie into Germany’s consciousness, and then beyond to an unwilling world. As a consequence, 85 million people were [...]

Life After Death With the Poets

By |2020-08-14T12:21:34-05:00August 16th, 2020|Categories: Christianity, Dante, Death, Great Books, Homer, Joseph Pearce, Poetry, Senior Contributors, Virgil|

The greatest poets, including Homer, Virgil, and Dante, ask what happens to the human soul after death. Do the dead become mere shadows of their former selves or do they become more real? The greatest poets have always asked the most important questions. One of the most important questions concerns the destiny of the human [...]

The Pro-Life Themes of Uberto Pasolini’s “Still Life”

By |2020-08-13T15:56:45-05:00August 13th, 2020|Categories: Beauty, Community, Culture, Death, Dwight Longenecker, Film, Senior Contributors|

Uberto Pasolini’s “Still Life” is a haunting, original, and moving tribute to human worth and self-sacrificial love at the street level. It is a beautiful, quiet film that packs an emotional and philosophical punch far beyond its weight. Always on the lookout for a film that is better than the formulaic, ideologically-driven entertainment that is [...]

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