“We Are Alive”

By |2020-03-26T15:22:26-05:00March 26th, 2020|Categories: Audio/Video, Bruce Springsteen, Death, Music|

Bruce Springsteen has called "We Are Alive," the final song on his 2012 album, "Wrecking Ball," a "ghost story." That it is, but it is also a song of high spirits and hope, one that deals with the Christian themes of resurrection and the communion of saints. There's a cross up yonder up on Calvary [...]

The Coronavirus, the New World Order, and America First

By |2020-03-15T13:49:38-05:00March 13th, 2020|Categories: Coronavirus, Death, Europe, Foreign Affairs, Pat Buchanan|

It may one day be said that the coronavirus delivered the deathblow to the New World Order, to a half-century of globalization, and to the era of interdependence of the world’s great nations. Which rings truer today? We are all part of mankind, all citizens of the world. Or that it’s time to put America [...]

“Spirits of the Dead”

By |2020-03-10T11:37:48-05:00March 10th, 2020|Categories: Death, Edgar Allan Poe, Poetry|

1 Thy soul shall find itself alone 'Mid dark thoughts of the grey tomb-stone — Not one, of all the crowd, to pry Into thine hour of secrecy: 2 Be silent in that solitude ⁠Which is not loneliness—for then The spirits of the dead who stood ⁠In life before thee are again In death around [...]

Memento Mori: Unpopular Thoughts on the Coronavirus

By |2020-03-15T13:55:49-05:00March 9th, 2020|Categories: Coronavirus, Death|

What worries me about the current reaction to coronavirus, is that it seems to reflect a belief that death is an aberration, rather than a part of the natural order of things. As the human species continues to expand massively in numbers, and as it continues casually to make other species extinct, it is inevitable [...]

Coronavirus Plague and Apocalyptic Panic

By |2020-03-15T14:42:29-05:00March 8th, 2020|Categories: Coronavirus, Death, Dwight Longenecker, Senior Contributors|

There is good news about the coronavirus. Although there is a good bit of uncertainty, the predominant trend is that the virus is not the killer plague so many are worried about. The Center for Disease Control has issued a simple fact sheet, which includes this statement: What we do know about the virus is [...]

“The Masque of the Red Death”

By |2020-03-13T01:01:28-05:00March 5th, 2020|Categories: Death, Edgar Allan Poe, Literature|

The red death had long devastated the country. No pestilence had ever been so fatal, or so hideous. Blood was its Avatar and its seal -- the madness and the horror of blood. There were sharp pains, and sudden dizziness, and then profuse bleeding at the pores, with dissolution. The scarlet stains upon the body [...]

Oh, Death, Where is Thy. . .

By |2020-01-24T09:44:48-06:00January 22nd, 2020|Categories: Bradley J. Birzer, Death, Imagination, Roger Scruton, Senior Contributors|

Death is a truly strange thing. It has touched each of us, to be sure, by visiting loved ones. Yet, sometimes, it seems just unbelievably relentless. Death has already taken so many greats in the first half of January 2020—Neil Peart on January 7; Sir Roger Scruton on January 12; and Christopher Tolkien on [...]

Warfare in Epic Poetry

By |2019-08-11T15:38:58-05:00August 11th, 2019|Categories: Death, Great Books, Homer, Iliad, Odyssey, Timeless Essays, War|

A culture that fails to represent, or that misrepresents its wars in all their glory, gravity, and tragedy, is a weaker polity. Epic poetry, with its stark recording of the facts and feelings of war, can give cultures and communities access to the reality of warfare and inscribe its memory on the collective consciousness [...]

An Introduction to English War Poetry

By |2019-08-09T21:38:25-05:00August 9th, 2019|Categories: Death, England, History, Literature, Poetry, War, World War I|

The poet’s career doesn’t end once he dies. The soldier’s career arguably does. The poet-soldier, then, has died physically, but what remains of him is his art. Both Edward Thomas and Francis Ledwidge managed to create something that transcended their persons and lasted long after being killed in war. When we think of English [...]

From Hector to Christ

By |2020-04-07T03:58:09-05:00August 3rd, 2019|Categories: Death, Great Books, Homer, Iliad, Paul Krause|

Hector, in many ways, is the closest to Christ in the ancient pagan world of heroes, literature, and lore. Yet, he falls short of Christ as all men do—and as all pagans did. But there is something remarkably sacramental about Hector to the Christian reader; there is something about Hector that shows glimpses of [...]

Death and Deception: “Longford” and “Dead Man Walking”

By |2019-12-10T15:49:19-06:00May 10th, 2019|Categories: Audio/Video, Culture, Death, Dwight Longenecker, Evil, Film, Justice|

While the films “Longford” and “Dead Man Walking” are ostensibly about the death penalty, the real value of both films is their profound exploration of the depth of human evil. On June 7, 1998 a Texan, John William King, along with friends Shawn Berry and Lawrence Brewer, killed African American James Byrd. They beat [...]

“Ballade of Assisted Suicide”

By |2019-02-19T13:38:21-06:00February 19th, 2019|Categories: Culture, Death, Poetry|

He’d had that thing for years – some dreadful woe – I can’t remember what it’s called – I guess he’d had enough, although I don’t know all the details. Was he bald? I haven’t seen him for a while; he crawled Into the doctor’s once, all short of breath; I would have helped [...]