The Reality of the Resurrection

By |2021-04-03T17:34:25-05:00April 3rd, 2021|Categories: Catholicism, Christianity, Culture, Dwight Longenecker, Easter, Gospel Reflection, Philosophy, Timeless Essays|

Too often we Christians have given in to the temptation to sanitize the crucifixion and sentimentalize the resurrection. But the resurrection was not, at first, a cause for rejoicing, but the source of fear—soul-shaking, knee-knocking, heart-pounding, earth-quaking fear. One of the good things about Mel Gibson’s The Passion of the Christ is the gore. He [...]

John With Jesus: From Passover to the Garden of Gethsemane

By |2021-04-01T13:15:46-05:00April 1st, 2021|Categories: Barbara J. Elliott, Catholicism, Christianity, Easter, Gospel Reflection, Senior Contributors, Timeless Essays|

I went with Peter to make the arrangements for the Passover supper. When we arrived in Jerusalem, Jesus had told us to look for a man carrying a pitcher of water. We were to follow him into the house he entered, ask to speak to the owner, and say: “The master asks you where is [...]

Craftsmanship Can Save the World: The American College of Building Arts

By |2021-03-28T21:14:53-05:00March 28th, 2021|Categories: Architecture, Beauty, Joseph Pearce, Labor/Work, Senior Contributors, Timeless Essays|

The American College of the Building Arts (ACBA) is unlike any college that I know. Indeed it is the only school in the entire country offering a four-year degree in traditional craftsmanship. “Along with pens, paper, books, and computers, students here learn with trowels, chisels, hammers, and anvils,” writes Logan Ward in Garden & Gun. [...]

The American Republic & the Long Shadow of Rome

By |2021-03-14T20:36:55-05:00March 14th, 2021|Categories: American Republic, Rome, Stephen M. Klugewicz, Timeless Essays|

The figure of Brutus—the assassin of the tyrant—has cast a long shadow over American history. The American Founders looked to the Roman Empire embodied by Caesar as an example of how their own republic too could be undone by the ambition of one man. “Beware the Ides of March!” Thus the soothsayer warned Emperor Julius [...]

The Plight of the Conservative Artist in a Liberal World

By |2021-02-26T14:20:14-06:00March 1st, 2021|Categories: Art, Culture, Morality, Timeless Essays, Virtue|

The left has long understood the power of the arts in furthering radical ideas, in a way conservatives have largely failed to grasp in defending theirs. Conservatives with the financial means must increase their support of conservative artists for the sake of a culture in immediate need of the wisdom that a long intellectual, cultural, [...]

George Washington and the “Gift of Silence”

By |2021-02-20T21:04:00-06:00February 21st, 2021|Categories: American Founding, American Republic, George Washington, Leadership, Stephen M. Klugewicz, Timeless Essays|

George Washington, the great actor, was playing his part in a great drama, not just for Americans of his day, but for you and me. Washington, the Stoic, used his “gift of silence” shrewdly, and surely it is his actions more than his words that echo down to us today. In December 2009, a letter [...]

Reflections on American Order

By |2021-01-07T16:43:42-06:00January 7th, 2021|Categories: Essential, Order, Ordered Liberty, RAK, Roots of American Order, Russell Kirk, Timeless Essays|

Order is the first need of all. One finds happiness in restoring and improving the order of the soul and the order of the republic—not in acts of devastation that make a desert of spirit and of society. Imagine a man travelling through the night, without a guide, thinking continually of the direction he wishes [...]

“The Speech”: Maintaining Sanity in an Insane World

By |2021-01-08T09:36:34-06:00January 6th, 2021|Categories: Civilization, Culture, Forrest McDonald, Hope, Imagination, Timeless Essays, Wisdom|

I propose to address the question, how does one survive—and I mean survive as something—in a world that may not? How does one remain sane in a world that is insane; how does one live without fear in a world in which the only certainty is that nothing is certain? As the new year arrives, [...]

The Magi and the Obstinacy of Belief

By |2021-01-05T16:22:22-06:00January 5th, 2021|Categories: Books, Christianity, Culture, Dwight Longenecker, History, Religion, Senior Contributors, Timeless Essays|

The refusal to consider the possibility that the Magi were historical figures and not mythical magicians reflects the bias of both modernists and conservative believers. For Saint Matthew’s Gospel to actually be true rocks both their boats. As the new year begins, The Imaginative Conservative looks back at some of its finest essays of the [...]

The Past as Battlefield: The Power of Historiography

By |2021-01-04T16:20:03-06:00January 4th, 2021|Categories: Culture, History, Politics, Timeless Essays, Truth, Western Civilization|

Historiography is not an exchange in the marketplace but a fight on the battlefield.  It has a particular point of view on the past and punishes opponents; it is power politics masked as tolerant neutrality. The Left—like those behind the 1619 Project—understand the stakes and are fighting to maintain their legitimacy.  It is time the Right [...]

Learning Latin the Medieval Way

By |2021-01-02T11:52:09-06:00January 2nd, 2021|Categories: Classical Education, Culture, Education, Language, Timeless Essays, Western Tradition|

Latin, as the primary historical language of erudition and learning in the West, is the sole gateway into the halls of Western thought and humanistic learning. Without the use of this language, we can hardly know ourselves, and certainly not the road that brought us to the modern day. As the old year ends and [...]

What Does It Mean to Be a Person of Culture?

By |2021-01-01T10:09:41-06:00January 1st, 2021|Categories: Christianity, Civilization, Culture, Liberal Learning, Michael De Sapio, Senior Contributors, Timeless Essays, Western Civilization|

True culture is a liberation from the ephemeral, a journey toward permanence and value. A cultured life, therefore, consists in more than just piling up facts; it must include reflecting on the meaning of man’s works—especially those works which have stood the test time—and how they fit into the larger scheme of reality. As the [...]

Russell Kirk’s Beauty and Civilization

By |2020-12-31T22:59:39-06:00December 31st, 2020|Categories: Beauty, Bradley J. Birzer, Conservatism, Modernity, Religion, Russell Kirk, Senior Contributors, Timeless Essays, Western Civilization|

As the old year ends and the new year arrives, The Imaginative Conservative looks back at some of its finest essays of 2020. —Editors In the late 1950s, as Russell Kirk considered what needed to be conserved in the Western tradition as well as what needed to be discarded, he lamented that much of what [...]

Go to Top