W.H. Auden’s Discovery of Original Sin

By |2020-08-03T17:01:58-05:00August 4th, 2020|Categories: Literature, Poetry, T.S. Eliot|Tags: , |

For several months after his 1939 immigration to the United States, W.H. Auden (1907-1973) remained enchanted with all the old dogmas—psychology, Marxism, and liberal humanism—that had shaped so much of his early work. As a poet, he continued to assert his faith in man’s ability to save civilization from ruin. Composed like all mankind [...]

“Good Things Out of Nazareth”: The Letters & Life of Flannery O’Connor

By |2020-07-30T12:22:15-05:00August 2nd, 2020|Categories: Books, Christianity, Flannery O'Connor, Literature, South|

“Good Things Out of Nazareth: The Uncollected Letters of Flannery O’Connor and Friends” is the epistolary record of Flannery O’Connor’s other life, the life lived behind the printed page in small-town Georgia. This life is not nearly as “large and startling” as her fiction, but it is unforgettable all the same. Good Things Out [...]

“The Art of Loving”

By |2020-08-02T13:57:44-05:00August 2nd, 2020|Categories: Love, Poetry|

The art of loving might look like a bard’s Familiar ballad, playful yet precise— All fingers dancing, never strained by self Or hesitation, fret to joyful fret, A perfect, reckless, troubadour’s delight, Like friends who wonder at the firmament’s Vast steadiness, how it remains the same, Yet never ceases to draw our eyes up. [...]

An Oaf’s Magnificat: On Kingsley Amis and “Lucky Jim”

By |2020-07-29T17:17:10-05:00July 30th, 2020|Categories: Books, Education, Fiction, Humor, Literature, Satire|

In 1954, “Lucky Jim” was a new planet: When Kingsley Amis wrote it, English satirical fiction had been for a third of a century a decidedly mandarin and highbrow business. Unlike his predecessors, Amis depicts representatives of the lower orders and the previously inaccessible university world that is not so much a garden of [...]

Marianne Moore’s Baseball Poems

By |2020-08-03T14:35:29-05:00July 27th, 2020|Categories: Baseball, Character, Christianity, Culture, History, Literature, Poetry, Sports|

As we attempt to understand Marianne Moore’s baseball poems, it is important to see the contextual influence of her brother and their mutual interest in Pauline Christianity, a tradition they never abandoned. There is some mystery in the space between sport and religion that many Christian athletes inhabit and of which Marianne Moore is [...]

Summer Reading: Good Books for Strange Times

By |2020-08-01T23:44:22-05:00July 25th, 2020|Categories: Books, Christianity, Education, Glenn Arbery, Literature, Senior Contributors, Wyoming Catholic College|

Despite all efforts to cancel good sense, common decency, a real sense of justice, respect for the law, and fear of God, these things will reassert themselves, as will the gifts of faith, hope, and charity. What better summer reading for an age of martyrs than the great works of the Western tradition that [...]

“Advent of the Eskaton”

By |2020-07-25T12:10:18-05:00July 25th, 2020|Categories: Christianity, Evil, Imagination, Poetry|

‘You may say this to Théoden son of Thengel: open war lies before him, with Sauron or against him. None may live now as they have lived, and few shall keep what they call their own. —J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings ‘Ware, ‘ware! in the watches of the night; for the devil reigns in darkness [...]

Ernst Jünger’s “The Forest Passage” and the Conservative Mind

By |2020-07-20T13:42:50-05:00July 21st, 2020|Categories: Books, Conservatism, Freedom, Imagination, Literature, Myth, Nature|

Written in the shadow of the Second World War, Ernst Jünger’s “The Forest Passage” reimagines the forest as a symbol of freedom in an age where the “Leviathan,” or all-encompassing totalitarian state, threatens to encroach on liberty and free space. Yet as long as the “forest rebel” has access to the domains of art, [...]

Going Over Jordan: Images of Baptism in “1917”

By |2020-07-18T17:49:07-05:00July 18th, 2020|Categories: Christianity, Culture, Film, Literature, Poetry, War, World War I|

Sam Mendes’ appropriation of baptismal imagery allows the film “1917” to achieve the rare feat of portraying the First World War in terms of hope and rebirth rather than merely of pity and death. As we watch the protagonist Schofield’s journey, we recall that we have been buried and raised with Christ. I was [...]

Joseph Conrad’s Imagination

By |2020-07-16T17:04:49-05:00July 15th, 2020|Categories: Books, George A. Panichas, Great Books, Imagination, Literature, Moral Imagination|

For Joseph Conrad, the struggle between good and evil in the human soul was a permanent reality, a reality one might prefer to avoid, or try to sublimate, but one that nobody who has lived long can absolutely deny. Joseph Conrad: His Moral Vision, by George A. Panichas (165 pages, Mercer University Press, 2005) [...]

The Sweet Value of Literature

By |2020-07-12T15:33:32-05:00July 11th, 2020|Categories: Christine Norvell, Great Books, Literature, Senior Contributors|

Our literature choices shouldn’t be confined by categories and comparison. We should consider what sustains us, what brings life and hope, what bears fruit in us. Literature can inspire virtue and dispel fear, and Francesco Petrarch would call us to absorb the “precious treasure of learning” through a full feast of literature. As Petrarch [...]

“The Cremation of Sam McGee”

By |2020-07-10T00:52:53-05:00July 11th, 2020|Categories: Audio/Video, Poetry|

There are strange things done in the midnight sun ⁠By the men who moil for gold; The Arctic trails have their secret tales ⁠That would make your blood run cold; The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, ⁠But the queerest they ever did see Was that night on the marge of Lake Lebarge ⁠I cremated [...]

How Ray Bradbury Predicted 2020

By |2020-07-06T16:33:02-05:00July 7th, 2020|Categories: American Republic, Bradley J. Birzer, Community, Literature, Modernity, Ray Bradbury, Senior Contributors|

In Ray Bradbury’s understanding, the government might very well be wicked and evil, but it would always follow the lead of the Masses and become their tool, rather than the other way around. I’ve been reading the works of Ray Bradbury since grade school. Probably like many of my generation, I was introduced to [...]

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