Joseph Baldacchino

Joseph Baldacchino

About Joseph Baldacchino

Joseph Baldacchino is President of the National Humanities Institute and Editor of Humanitas.

How Congress Can Revive the Constitution

By |2019-08-15T15:10:08-05:00November 13th, 2016|Categories: American Republic, Constitution, Featured, Federalist Papers, History, Timeless Essays|

Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords readers the opportunity to join Joseph Baldacchino as he explores what actions are necessary in order for Congress to revive the U.S. Constitution. —W. Winston Elliott III, Publisher The Framers were acutely sensitive to the fears of many that a new federal government would erode the independence [...]

Religious Freedom and the Constitution

By |2019-01-22T12:17:13-05:00June 20th, 2012|Categories: American Founding, American Republic, Books, Constitution|Tags: , |

The American Myth of Religious Freedom, by Kenneth R. Craycraft, Jr. This book provides a good example of the distortion of reality, not to mention mind-torturing confusion, that occurs when political documents—in this instance, the religious clauses of the First Amendment and the writings of Locke, Jefferson, and Madison—are viewed through sectarian glasses and [...]

Freedom Requires Restraint: Where Movement Conservatism Went Wrong—And How to Fix It

By |2017-06-26T12:29:48-05:00February 2nd, 2011|Categories: Conservatism, Leadership, Russell Kirk|Tags: |

Russell Kirk In the wake of the 2008 elections the Republican Party looked to be on its last legs. Not only had Barack Obama triumphed in the presidential race, picking up the electoral votes of such previously “red” states as Virginia, North Carolina, and Florida, but the Democrats had widened the majorities [...]

How Congress Can Revive the Constitution

By |2017-06-22T16:41:52-05:00January 27th, 2011|Categories: American Founding, American Republic, Constitution, Politics|Tags: |

The Framers were acutely sensitive to the fears of many that a new federal government would erode the independence and authority of the states and the people. To protect against that possibility, they stipulated that the federal government would have only a short list of powers that were explicitly enumerated in the Constitution. “The [...]