Unearthed History: The War of The Vendée

By |2019-04-23T23:44:18-05:00April 23rd, 2019|Categories: Catholicism, Europe, History, Revolution|

The series of battles that took place in the Vendée have been almost entirely excluded from any recounting of the Revolution. Why? The rising in the Vendée paints a darker picture of the evils that Revolutionists did to those citizens, most of them peasants, who would not adopt the principles of the Revolution. Something about the [...]

Political Parties During the American Founding Era?

By |2019-04-25T10:48:28-05:00April 22nd, 2019|Categories: American Founding, American Republic, Bradley J. Birzer, History, Politics, Senior Contributors|

Contrary to the vast majority of my fellow scholars of American history, I have never found the account of the creation of political parties in the Founding Era and Early Republic to be credible. Admittedly, my position is one of an extremely small minority, so I do not mean to suggest that historians are ready [...]

A Connecticut Yankee and the Failure of Progressivism

By |2019-04-15T23:19:15-05:00April 15th, 2019|Categories: Books, History, Literature, Mark Malvasi, Mark Twain, Modernity, Progressivism, Senior Contributors|

No writer so early recognized and so credibly exposed the dangerous inadequacies concealed in the Progressive world view than did Mark Twain in his sardonic novel A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court. I. By 1912, the triumph of Progressivism was complete. Both Woodrow Wilson and Theodore Roosevelt had advertised themselves as Progressive candidates, [...]

Composers and Wine

By |2019-04-11T22:23:27-05:00April 11th, 2019|Categories: Character, Culture, History, Music|

As a wine professional and classically trained musician, I’ve always wanted to know if wine was important in the lives of the great composers. Did Bach, Mozart, or Beethoven enjoy wine daily? Did they keep a cellar? Did they write about the wines they drank? I’ve never been able to find much about the [...]

Maryland’s 1867 State Constitution, Among the Oldest in Use Today

By |2019-04-10T22:39:31-05:00April 10th, 2019|Categories: American Founding, Constitution, History|

Maryland has one of the oldest state constitutions in use today, as well as one of the longest Declarations of Rights. As such, it provides both the historian and constitutional scholar much to occupy their time. A detailed study of the rights of Maryland’s citizens will be time well spent. Maryland is the seventh [...]

Coming Home: Tradition and My Hometown

By |2019-04-07T21:01:24-05:00April 7th, 2019|Categories: History, Michael De Sapio, Senior Contributors, Tradition|

The beauty of one’s home, neighborhood, and community is easy to forget, especially in an age as transient and rootless as ours. Yet, it’s in the quiet moments or on a historic occasion in your hometown that you are pulled back to consider the things that surround you. “Coming home” is an important process [...]

Bob Kane and Bill Finger: Batman’s Creators

By |2019-04-06T00:28:33-05:00April 5th, 2019|Categories: Batman Series, Bradley J. Birzer, Character, History, Senior Contributors, Superheroes|

Though somewhat disputed as to just how much each person contributed to the creation of the character and backstory of The Batman, both Robert Kane (born Robert Kahn; 1915-1998), as credited in the first story, and Milton Bill Finger (1914-1974), not credited, invented the character. The two had actually teamed up during the several [...]

“The Nihilism of the Empty Tomb”

By |2019-04-05T13:13:21-05:00April 5th, 2019|Categories: Christianity, History, Literature, Poetry|

They seek him here; they seek him there. Those Frenchies seek him everywhere. Is he in heaven?—Is he in hell? That damned, elusive Pimpernel!  —The Scarlet Pimpernel, Baroness Orczy “Come now, let us be reasonable men as befits us in this epoch, this age, of enlightenment. If such it be, then why must we continue [...]

The Last Modernist: The Legacy of Jacques Barzun

By |2019-04-04T22:29:20-05:00April 4th, 2019|Categories: Jacques Barzun|

As recently as half a century ago, there was a significant community in the United States which aspired—in a humble, decent, republican way—to acquire and promote high culture. These were the sort of people who launched “great books” programs, and begged European intellectuals to cross the Atlantic and teach them everything they knew. Jacques Barzun [...]

William Warburton’s “Via Media” Between Church and State

By |2019-04-05T13:21:54-05:00April 4th, 2019|Categories: Civil Society, Europe, History, Religion|

William Warburton was a man who, as a theologian living through the debates of the Enlightenment, readapted his role while staying true to its intentions. His was a distinctive voice in these debates because he attacked all sides equally, seeing a paradox between human thought and history. Part of the purpose of intellectual history [...]

The Articles of Confederation and State Sovereignty

By |2019-03-31T21:32:32-05:00March 31st, 2019|Categories: American Founding, American Republic, Founding Document, History, Nationalism, Timeless Essays|

Article II of the Articles of Confederation codified that one of the purposes of the American Revolution was the protection of state sovereignty, by making state sovereignty a fundamental aspect of the American constitutional order… Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords our readers the opportunity to join Nathan Coleman. The crisis with [...]

Batman and the Rise of the American Superhero

By |2019-04-05T14:00:06-05:00March 29th, 2019|Categories: Batman Series, Bradley J. Birzer, Character, Heroism, History, Senior Contributors, Western Civilization|

Against the suffocating world of Nazism, communism, Holocaust camps, and gulags, imagination found a new life in the 1940s and 1950s, as artists strove for a renewal of beauty, goodness, and truth. It is only in this context that one can understand the rise of the “superhero,” among whom none have endured as well [...]

On Baseball

By |2019-03-27T22:20:45-05:00March 27th, 2019|Categories: Baseball, Jacques Barzun|

Whoever wants to know the heart and mind of America had better learn baseball, the rules and realities of the game. That baseball fitly expresses the powers of the nation's mind and body is a merit separate from the glory of being the most active, agile, varied, articulate, and brainy of all group games. People [...]