James Otis, Then and Now

By |2021-01-18T15:38:58-06:00January 18th, 2021|Categories: American Founding, American Republic, Bradley J. Birzer, History, Politics, Rights, Senior Contributors|

Going back to the first principles of the Founding, one finds that the Founders talked unceasingly about rights. Rights language became a critical part of the cultural landscape when James Otis delivered his oration on the nature of rights, the common law, and the natural law. Feel free to call me a conservative (I [...]

Robert Nisbet’s Mentor: Frederick Teggart

By |2021-01-14T15:58:26-06:00January 15th, 2021|Categories: Bradley J. Birzer, History, Robert Nisbet, Senior Contributors|

Robert Nisbet was greatly influenced by his professor Frederick Teggart and his many ideas. Teggart was a brilliant scholar and historian, one of University of California Berkeley’s most successful lecturers, and “an impressive stretcher of minds.” “I have met no one since then who has approached him in range, diversity, and depth of knowledge,” [...]

The Disastrous Implications of Historical Amnesia

By |2021-01-10T15:26:33-06:00January 10th, 2021|Categories: History, Politics|

A society beset with historical amnesia is a dangerous one. History in the 21st-century academy has been warped into “social studies,” where the past is studied through the lenses of sociology and psychology. We conservatives need to promote a society that understands that studying the past as it happened is vital to the success [...]

The Magi and the Obstinacy of Belief

By |2021-01-05T16:22:22-06:00January 5th, 2021|Categories: Books, Christianity, Culture, Dwight Longenecker, History, Religion, Senior Contributors, Timeless Essays|

The refusal to consider the possibility that the Magi were historical figures and not mythical magicians reflects the bias of both modernists and conservative believers. For Saint Matthew’s Gospel to actually be true rocks both their boats. As the new year begins, The Imaginative Conservative looks back at some of its finest essays of [...]

The Past as Battlefield: The Power of Historiography

By |2021-01-04T16:20:03-06:00January 4th, 2021|Categories: Culture, History, Politics, Timeless Essays, Truth, Western Civilization|

Historiography is not an exchange in the marketplace but a fight on the battlefield.  It has a particular point of view on the past and punishes opponents; it is power politics masked as tolerant neutrality. The Left—like those behind the 1619 Project—understand the stakes and are fighting to maintain their legitimacy.  It is time the [...]

History and the Holy Family

By |2020-12-26T09:49:26-06:00December 23rd, 2020|Categories: Christianity, Christmas, History, Joseph Pearce, Senior Contributors, Uncategorized|

Our destiny is not ultimate non-existence via the grave but an everlasting existence beyond the grave. The birth of Christ is the death of Death. The Incarnation was at the centre of history and was also its end. This is the Good News of the Gospel that we celebrate at Christmas. There are three [...]

George Washington Resigns His Military Commission

By |2020-12-28T11:27:17-06:00December 22nd, 2020|Categories: American Founding, George Washington, History|

John Trumbull, who would memorialize this great event in a painting which—commissioned in 1817 by Congress—now hangs in the United States Capitol Rotunda, called Washington’s resignation “one of the highest moral lessons ever given to the world.” In an example of unrivaled statesmanship, General George Washington resigned his military commission at the State House [...]

The Road Away From Conservatism

By |2020-12-10T16:10:46-06:00December 10th, 2020|Categories: Architecture, Conservatism, Culture, England, History|

The project of the Stonehenge tunnel is a financially irresponsible state goal endeavour during a time of fiscal crisis and contraction, ignoring the reverence of heritage and undermining the social contract. From the bulldozing of Victorian buildings to the sacrilegious tunnelling, England’s Conservative Party is not acting conservative. The greatest obstacle facing Boris Johnson [...]

Sitting Bull and the Wrath of Achilles

By |2020-12-04T11:30:40-06:00December 6th, 2020|Categories: American West, Glenn Arbery, History, Senior Contributors, War, Wyoming Catholic College|

The story of the Indian Wars for the American West in Peter Cozzens’s “The Earth Is Weeping” contains the tragic patterns of all human history. This history, like all real history, lives once we awaken memory and see the real contours of what lies before us. One of the compensations for long hours in [...]

Is Patriotic Education a Good Idea?

By |2020-11-26T18:59:28-06:00November 26th, 2020|Categories: American Republic, History, Patriotism|

We are not only failing to educate our young people, but we are also teaching them to despise their country. But the left immediately attacked President Trump's solution to this problem, comparing his commission on patriotic education to the indoctrination of Hitler Youth organizations in Nazi Germany. Last week my friend John was chatting with [...]

The Southern (Catholic) Tradition

By |2020-11-21T16:31:24-06:00November 21st, 2020|Categories: American Republic, Catholicism, Christianity, History, South|

Part of the South’s charm is an ability to recognize the good, true, and beautiful in traditions other than its principally Protestant identity and heritage. And Kevin Starr’s excellent history reveals that American Catholic identity is deeply Southern. Continental Achievement: Roman Catholics in the United States, by Kevin Starr (330 pages, Ignatius Press, 2020) [...]

Signing of the Mayflower Compact

By |2020-11-20T15:38:01-06:00November 20th, 2020|Categories: American Republic, Christianity, Civilization, Government, History, Mayflower Compact|

In the name of God, amen. We whose names are under written… [h]aving undertaken for the Glory of God, and advancement of the christian [sic] faith, and the honour of our King and country, a voyage to plant the first colony in the northern parts of Virginia; do by these presents solemnly and mutually, [...]

The Legend of the Fog

By |2020-11-13T12:42:31-06:00November 19th, 2020|Categories: Culture, History, Myth|

Part of the modernist mythos has been the idea that historical clarity increases exponentially the closer one gets to one’s own time. The myth tells us that the origins of mankind, the development of civilization, the foundation of certain human institutions are all lost in the dim past. This is what I will call [...]

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