“The Pioneers”: Heroic Settlers & American Ideal

By |2020-07-06T18:13:45-05:00July 6th, 2020|Categories: American Republic, American West, Books, Gleaves Whitney, History|

Despite America’s flawed past, despite the fact that previous generations honored some questionable individuals, our history did not unfold solely within the grid of racism. New England pioneers possessed high ideals of justly ordered freedom, and they carried those ideals west, and in “The Pioneers,” David McCullough is on nothing less than a civilizational [...]

The Native Americans Who Owned Slaves

By |2020-07-06T17:34:23-05:00July 6th, 2020|Categories: American Republic, Civil War, History, Slavery, War|

Europeans introduced the “Five Civilized Tribes” of the southeast to the institution of racial slavery. And during the Civil War, the Five Civilized Tribes fought on both the Union and Confederate sides. This often-overlooked part of American history takes on new significance in light of today’s debates over slavery reparations and monuments to those [...]

“Mount Rushmore”

By |2020-07-06T18:42:25-05:00July 6th, 2020|Categories: Abraham Lincoln, American Republic, Audio/Video, George Washington, History, Music, Thomas Jefferson|

Drawing from American musical sources and texts, Michael Dougherty's composition for chorus and orchestra echoes the resonance and dissonance of Mount Rushmore as a complex icon of American history. Like Mount Rushmore, the libretto is carved out of the words of each President. Mount Rushmore (2010) for chorus and orchestra is inspired by the monumental [...]

July 4, 1776: Congress Adopts the Declaration of Independence

By |2020-07-03T15:41:32-05:00July 3rd, 2020|Categories: American Founding, American Republic, American Revolution, Declaration of Independence, History, Independence Day, Thomas Jefferson|

The adoption of the Declaration of Independence of “the thirteen united States of America” on July 4, 1776 formally ended a process that had been set in motion almost as soon as colonies were established in what became British North America. The early settlers, once separated physically from the British Isles by an immense [...]

Died on the 4th of July: Fisher Ames, Founding Father

By |2020-07-03T14:01:47-05:00July 3rd, 2020|Categories: American Founding, American Republic, Civil Society, Fisher Ames, History|

Much can be learned from the life of Fisher Ames. He displayed more promise than perhaps any of our other great statesmen, and he personified two of conservatism’s most indelible tenets: Life is fragile, and all is vanity. But he was also quick to see how American citizens embraced their “liberty,” and he did [...]

Nothing But Glory Gained: Pickett’s Charge at Gettysburg

By |2020-06-30T19:10:31-05:00July 2nd, 2020|Categories: Civil War, History, Robert Cheeks, Robert E. Lee, South|

On that summer-hot afternoon at Gettysburg, after two days of fighting in the summer-lush Pennsylvania countryside, the fate of two nations still hung in the balance. General Robert E. Lee intended to tip the scales. Just before 3 o’clock on the morning of July 3, 1863, Robert E. Lee rose by starlight, ate a [...]

“Hungary”

By |2020-06-28T19:53:00-05:00June 26th, 2020|Categories: Character, Christianity, Fiction, History, Imagination, Religion|

History’s tyrants and thieves remain with us, and if things get very dark sometimes, then my best hope is to do the right thing in the light of His Grace. That’s all I can hope to do, passing on that Grace whenever I can. It’s strange how I can’t remember this guy’s whole name [...]

Revolutions: 2020 vs. 1776

By |2020-06-24T15:37:26-05:00June 24th, 2020|Categories: American Founding, American Republic, Bradley J. Birzer, Declaration of Independence, History, Modernity, Revolution, Senior Contributors|

The revolutionaries of 1776 could be just as violent as those of 2020, but they were truly a lot more intelligent and interesting. Eighteenth-century Americans fought with several generations worth of finely-honed arguments—from law, from experience, and from scripture, whereas the protestors of 2020, while armed with anger, seem armed with little else. In [...]

Who Actually Discovered America?

By |2020-06-18T16:42:14-05:00June 18th, 2020|Categories: Bradley J. Birzer, Civilization, History, Senior Contributors|

Christopher Columbus is without a doubt responsible for the Columbian Exchange—which through human agency recreated the lost world of Pangea. But was Columbus the first to discover America? As noted in my previous essay here at The Imaginative Conservative, the memory—and especially the statues—of Christopher Columbus has taken quite the beating over the last [...]

A Curious Education: Winston Churchill and the Teaching of a Statesman

By |2020-06-18T00:19:08-05:00June 17th, 2020|Categories: Character, Culture, Education, History, Virtue, Winston Churchill|

Winston Churchill’s education deserves close study because it shaped his evolution from unsteady boyhood to rational statesmanship. It was this education that enabled him to exercise discernment and discover what was advantageous and disadvantageous, just and unjust, so that—whether in peacetime or in war—he could demonstrate remarkable qualities and serve the country he loved. [...]

“Their Finest Hour”: The Legendary Speech

By |2020-06-17T16:22:46-05:00June 17th, 2020|Categories: History, War, Winston Churchill, World War II|

On June 18, 1940, two days after France had sought an armistice with Germany, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill addressed the House of Commons about the calamitous turn of events in Europe. Britain now stood alone against Adolf Hitler’s military machine, and in this speech, Churchill bolsters his countrymen’s courage to fight for freedom [...]

Hail, Christopher Columbus!

By |2020-06-20T14:37:40-05:00June 15th, 2020|Categories: Bradley J. Birzer, Civilization, Europe, History, Senior Contributors|

The once-radical belief that Christopher Columbus was evil has sadly become mainstream. But Columbus was a brave and tenacious explorer—flawed, of course, like every man—who expanded the knowledge of the Old World, changing it and the New World forever. Christopher Columbus changed the world. It’s as simple as this. We might argue that these [...]