History

Letter From Birmingham Jail

By |2020-01-20T21:44:43-06:00January 20th, 2020|Categories: American Republic, Equality, History, Martin Luther King Jr., Primary Documents|

We know through painful experience that freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor. One may well ask, "How can you advocate breaking some laws and obeying others?" The answer is found in the fact that there are two types of laws: there are just laws, and there are unjust laws. I would agree with [...]

A Nation With No Memory Has No Future

By |2020-01-14T16:31:05-06:00January 18th, 2020|Categories: Culture, Europe, Government, History, Joseph Pearce, Politics, Senior Contributors|

Since nations are first and foremost cultural realities, the long-term viability and sustainability of nation states depends on the existence of healthy and living national cultures. If the culture withers and decays, the nation state will wither and decay in the culture’s wake. There are good practical and pragmatic political reasons for retaining the presence [...]

The Rise of Barbie and Rambo

By |2020-01-09T09:57:27-06:00January 9th, 2020|Categories: Culture, Culture War, Dwight Longenecker, Feminism, History, Senior Contributors|

Signs within the developing culture from the 1950s indicated, even then, a new confusion about sexual identity. From the dawn of time a man was defined as a father, or potential father. A woman was a mother, or potential mother. The whole delicate dance of courtship and sexual relationships circled around the undeniable link [...]

The Travels of Jonathan Swift

By |2020-01-08T10:45:46-06:00January 6th, 2020|Categories: Books, Great Books, History, Jonathan Swift, Paul Krause, Senior Contributors|

John Stubbs should be commended for his biography of the great Anglo-Irish satirist and clergyman. The work is not merely a biography; it is also an account that details the turbulence of the times in which Jonathan Swift lived, painting lively portraits of the many figures and personalities with whom he interacted. Jonathan Swift: The [...]

The Magi and the Obstinacy of Belief

By |2020-01-05T20:21:13-06:00January 5th, 2020|Categories: Books, Christianity, Culture, Dwight Longenecker, History, Religion, Senior Contributors|

The refusal to consider the possibility that the Magi were historical figures and not mythical magicians reflects the bias of both modernists and conservative believers. For Saint Matthew’s Gospel to actually be true rocks both their boats. My friend Sir Colin Humphreys wrote a book some time ago called The Miracles of Exodus. Sir [...]

Rousseau’s Collectivism

By |2020-01-04T14:06:31-06:00January 3rd, 2020|Categories: Bradley J. Birzer, Conservatism, History, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Philosophy, Politics, Senior Contributors|

“It would be difficult to find anywhere in the history of politics a more powerful and potentially revolutionary doctrine than Rousseau’s theory of the General Will. Power is freedom and freedom is power,” Robert Nisbet argued in his magnum opus, 1953’s Quest for Community. […]

E.E. Evans-Pritchard, Lived Religion, & the Libyan Jihad

By |2019-12-29T00:02:51-06:00December 28th, 2019|Categories: Books, Civilization, Conservatism, History, Islam, Muslim, Religion|

The moral imagination of E.E. Evans-Pritchard’s anthropology discerned great value in the cultures he studied, and he spoke out against the destruction of that value. By doing so he exhibited the finest elements of his own particular Western cultural inheritance, as a Christian, English gentleman, who was later, and appropriately, knighted. Evans-Pritchard’s The Sanusi [...]

The Business of America: The New Economy of the 1920s

By |2019-12-22T22:10:11-06:00December 22nd, 2019|Categories: American Republic, Economic History, Economics, History, Mark Malvasi, Senior Contributors|

The new economy that emerged after 1921 seemed to relegate to the past such painful depressions as the one that troubled the United States during the immediate postwar years.  As the 1920s drew to a close, however, the movement toward a new economy was about to encounter impediments that made a mockery of efforts to [...]

The Year They Tore Salem Depot Down

By |2019-12-21T09:49:36-06:00December 20th, 2019|Categories: Architecture, Culture, History, Modernity|

Salem Depot Towering over Salem, Massachusetts for over a century, the castellated Salem Depot awed some with its neo-Gothic majesty and dismayed others who considered it a dreary monument to the past. “Some say the Salem railroad station is the most hideous structure in America,” the Boston Globe joked in 1938. “Some [...]

HBO’s “Chernobyl” and Solzhenitsyn

By |2019-12-12T01:56:31-06:00December 10th, 2019|Categories: Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Civilization, Communism, Culture, History, Ideology, Television|

The new HBO series “Chernobyl” serves to warn us about the danger of persistent lies in a society that refuses to acknowledge truth. It would be a grave error not to take stock of our own tendencies toward deceit, as if our lies are radically different from those that underpinned the Soviet Union. Over [...]

Love, Peace, and War in Italy: A Memoir

By |2019-12-09T21:20:32-06:00December 9th, 2019|Categories: Books, E.B., Europe, Eva Brann, History, In Honor of Eva Brann at 90 Series, St. John's College|

Douglas Allanbrook’s memoir, “See Naples,”  is not only a memorial to the many dead, but also an exorcism, half-a-century later, of some particular ghosts. See Naples: A Memoir of Love, Peace, and War in Italy, by Douglas Allanbrook (A Peter Davison Book, Houghton Mifflin Company, New York and Boston, 1995) Douglas Allanbrook came to [...]

The Business of America: Economy and Society During the 1920s

By |2019-12-22T22:12:18-06:00November 24th, 2019|Categories: American Republic, Economic History, Economics, History, Mark Malvasi, Senior Contributors|

During the 1920s, America made the first excursion into mass affluence in the history of the world. However, the ethic of consumption that reached its apex in the 1920s fomented a subtle transformation not only of the American economy but also of American culture. I Long considered the haven of corrupt public officials and [...]

The Spontaneous Disorder of Kansas-Nebraska

By |2019-11-22T11:38:12-06:00November 19th, 2019|Categories: American Republic, Civil War, Democracy, History|

Stephen Douglas’s faith that democratic self-government on the American frontier would create a spontaneous order of lawful and virtuous communities, especially in the face of divisive issues like slavery, was disastrously misplaced and played a significant role in starting the Civil War. The Kansas-Nebraska Act passed 165 years ago this past spring, and as cannons [...]