America Must Return to the Noble Traditions of Her Founders

By |2020-09-23T12:45:12-05:00September 27th, 2020|Categories: American Founding, American Republic, Books, Constitution, Declaration of Independence, History, Politics, Slavery|

That it is the founding principles themselves to which we can turn to recover from the great evils of slavery, of the loss of virtue and moral standard, and of grotesque dehumanization should be a measure of the gratitude we owe to our Founding Fathers for their magnificent achievement. Robert R. Reilly is the [...]

Thomas Kuhn and the Persistence of Myth, Magic, and Genealogies

By |2020-09-22T11:03:31-05:00September 22nd, 2020|Categories: Faith, History, Myth, Science, Truth|

The relationship between science and the humanities is unavoidable simply because genealogies, in the end, are an extension of man’s thinking that combines reality with myth. Thomas Kuhn seemed to accept this fact, but today his colleagues’ aversion toward myth and magic has effected new iterations of magic that are devoid of meaning and [...]

The Indispensable Legacy of Gouverneur Morris

By |2020-09-15T11:01:27-05:00September 16th, 2020|Categories: American Founding, American Republic, Constitution, Constitution Day, Founding Document, History|

The role Gouverneur Morris played in the Miracle at Philadelphia is one that is often cropped out of the greater American Story. However, based on James Madison’s detailed account of the proceedings of the Convention, Morris has had a much greater impact on American political institutions than what Americans give him credit for. The [...]

The 1619 Project: Sending the Wrong Message to African Americans?

By |2020-09-13T23:12:16-05:00September 13th, 2020|Categories: American Republic, Equality, History, Politics, Slavery|

The 1619 Project is an instrument of propaganda whose insidious subtexts aim to promulgate the narrative that not only is America uniquely racist, but the nation cannot evolve beyond its history of slavery. Therefore, if America is to truly ascend, then the fatalism of the 1619 Project must be rejected. Criticisms of the 1619 [...]

The Toryism of Richard Henry Dana, Sr.

By |2020-09-10T13:20:58-05:00September 11th, 2020|Categories: American Republic, History, Literature|

Richard Henry Dana Sr.’s career followed a trajectory from romantic ardor, to disillusionment, to an embrace of traditionalism and social order. His life demonstrates that New England bore a rich Tory counter tradition of law and letters, not a monoculture of Whig and Republican industrialists, social reformers, and transcendentalist dreamers. Lucretia Mott listened with horror. [...]

A Canticle on a September Morn

By |2020-09-10T13:15:34-05:00September 10th, 2020|Categories: Christianity, History, Joseph Mussomeli, National Security, Politics, Terrorism|

I sometimes still worry that all the publicity centering around 9/11 drowns out the cries of those who died that day. I don’t want that to happen. The tragedy of their dying was corrupted from the very start by our leaders who failed to understand why they died and who used their dying for their [...]

“Triumph of the Will”: The Culture of Death on Screen

By |2020-09-03T00:11:08-05:00September 3rd, 2020|Categories: Culture, Death, Europe, Film, History, War, World War II|

Commissioned by Adolf Hitler, “Triumph of the Will” is a terrifying film. It is as if, for a moment, something infernal took control of the camera and caused the audience to be entranced, as it projected a lie into Germany’s consciousness, and then beyond to an unwilling world. As a consequence, 85 million people [...]

Memory & Hope: Restoring the Teaching of American History

By |2020-08-31T16:56:46-05:00August 31st, 2020|Categories: American Republic, Conservatism, Education, History, Hope, Liberalism, Progressivism|

The currently pervading approach to American history presents America in the worst possible light, distorting the full truth of our past and damaging our political health. Our K-12 schools need a restoration of temporal continuity, the key to revitalizing history and civics education that forms young people who both appreciate the gifts of the [...]

John Colet, Catholic Humanist

By |2020-08-25T14:26:21-05:00August 28th, 2020|Categories: Catholicism, Christian Humanism, Christianity, Education, History|

John Colet’s life and learning represent Catholic humanism at its finest. He advocated for such reforms in education as the soundest minds of his day also desired. He knew the value of learning and—unlike more than a few intellectuals—he knew also the limits of its advantages. To play about carelessly with the words “humanist” [...]

“Andreas” & the Redemptive Possibilities of the Past

By |2020-08-26T11:17:09-05:00August 27th, 2020|Categories: Christianity, Faith, History, Literature, Poetry|

In the Old English poem, “Andreas,” the fate of the old giant-work and the fate of the pagans were linked. The pagan stones became the site of a church—not only because of the miraculous flood, but because of the faith of the Apostle Andrew in the redemptive possibilities of the past. In the context [...]

Demystifying the Louvre

By |2020-08-26T16:37:23-05:00August 26th, 2020|Categories: Architecture, Art, Books, Culture, History, Western Civilization|

In recounting the growth of one of the West’s grandest cultural achievements, James Gardner is an admirably conservative guide to the impressive qualities of the Louvre. Today when Western civilization is under attack as never before, it is a paradox that the encyclopedic art museum, one of the characteristic achievements of this civilization, is [...]

The “Leatherstocking Tales” and the American Frontier

By |2020-08-21T14:20:39-05:00August 21st, 2020|Categories: American Republic, American West, Bradley J. Birzer, Civilization, History, Literature, Republicans, Senior Contributors|

James Fenimore Cooper’s depiction of the frontier, as expressed in the “Leatherstocking Tales,” transcends race and sex. The frontier can make anyone a true American—noble, liberty-loving, and virtuous. Ultimately, “Americanness” is individual and cultural; it is based on virtue and merit. 1822-1827: Republicanism and the American Frontier With his third novel, The Pioneers, James [...]

Michael Oakeshott on the Tensions Between Political Theory and Practice

By |2020-08-19T13:42:20-05:00August 19th, 2020|Categories: Civilization, History, Liberal Arts, Michael Oakeshott, Political Philosophy, Politics|

Political theory sets out to consider the kind of knowledge involved in political activity and the appropriate form of education that will continue to inculcate this knowledge and the value in sustaining such knowledge to society. Political theory may not be so theoretical, after all. Within political theory, there is a pressure to operate [...]

James Fenimore Cooper and the American Republic

By |2020-08-17T16:25:00-05:00August 17th, 2020|Categories: American Republic, Bradley J. Birzer, History, Literature, Politics, Senior Contributors|

Reflecting many thinkers before him, James Fenimore Cooper argued in his works that America had a biblical duty to be the “Light Upon the Hill.” Cooper also believed that both the frontier and republicanism made America unique, vigorous, and consequential, and he spent his adult life advocating a purely American form of art. “Places [...]

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