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Reflections on Imaginative Conservatism

By |2019-10-14T15:29:37-06:00May 21st, 2019|Categories: Conservatism, E.B., Eva Brann, Featured, Imagination, St. John's College, The Imaginative Conservative, Timeless Essays|

What’s “imaginative?” What’s “conservative?” And how does the adjective modify the noun and the noun support its adjective? My first and last care is not politics but education. Education seems to me inherently conservative, being the transmission, and thus the saving, of a tradition’s treasures of fiction and thought. But education is also inherently [...]

Ten Conservative Principles

By |2019-06-06T18:45:02-06:00May 20th, 2019|Categories: Conservatism, Essential, Featured, RAK, Russell Kirk|

Being neither a religion nor an ideology, the body of opinion termed conservatism possesses no Holy Writ and no Das Kapital to provide dogmata. So far as it is possible to determine what conservatives believe, the first principles of the conservative persuasion are derived from what leading conservative writers and public men have professed [...]

The Uneasy Hiatus of the Infantile Era

By |2019-04-07T17:28:53-06:00December 27th, 2018|Categories: Christian Humanism, Civilization, Culture, Featured|

The condition of contemporary civilization appears to be a startling combination of the best and the worst: its unprecedented material prosperity and technological ingenuity coexist with what seems to be an equally unprecedented degree of cultural crudeness and spiritual vacuity. Since this is an uneasy and likely unsustainable coexistence, it is only reasonable to inquire [...]

Christianity’s Home in Homelessness

By |2019-02-18T02:39:13-06:00December 23rd, 2018|Categories: Christian Humanism, Christianity, Culture, Faith, Featured, G.K. Chesterton|

Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords our readers the opportunity to join Casey Spinks, as he examines the Christian notion of home. —W. Winston Elliott III, Publisher The history of Western philosophy may be but a footnote on Plato, but the history of the whole of Western philosophy, theology, politics, science, art, and [...]

A Backwards Civilization: Unthinking Leaders, Frenzied Citizens

By |2019-10-11T09:40:12-06:00November 27th, 2018|Categories: Civil Society, Civilization, Democracy, Featured, Meno, Modernity, Plato, Political Philosophy, Politics, Socrates|

In America today, we are living in a toxic political climate that is the product of a very dangerous combination: Our rulers lack the learning necessary to ask the kinds of deep and fundamental questions that leaders and lawgivers ought to make a habit of pondering, while our people rebelliously scrutinize all orthodoxies and [...]

Family, Love, and Tragedy in “The Godfather”

By |2019-06-13T12:22:25-06:00November 22nd, 2018|Categories: Books, Culture, Featured, Film, Literature, Love, Morality, Paul Krause, Senior Contributors, St. Augustine, Tragedy|

The Godfather is the Augustinian film par excellence–though it does not conclude where Augustine's vision ends... The Godfather, by Mario Puzo, was the best-selling book when it was first published and the film adaptation by Francis Ford Coppola is rightly considered a masterpiece. The drama of The Godfather is an epic; it is an epic because [...]

Virtue and the City

By |2019-02-18T02:41:53-06:00November 18th, 2018|Categories: Aristotle, Cicero, Featured, Great Books, Paul Krause, Philosophy, Political Philosophy, Politics, St. Augustine, St. Thomas Aquinas, Timeless Essays|

Virtue is what the good city aims to achieve as part of the common good. Since humans are social animals and creatures of actions, the call to cultivate virtue within civil society is a fundamental aspect of the good society and the good regime... Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords our readers the [...]

Grace in the Garden: The Fall of Man & the British Pastoral Tradition

By |2019-06-12T16:09:14-06:00November 17th, 2018|Categories: Books, Featured, John Milton, Literature, Poetry, Russell Kirk, T.S. Eliot|

The transcendent ‘overcoming’ or reconciliation of the Fall of Man—that symbol of the cause of the disorder that we would wish re-ordered, of the return to the garden—is what great poetry graciously asks of us. “An intermediate nature... prevents the universe falling into two separate halves.” —Plato, Symposium (203b). Almost from the beginning of when human [...]

Of Men, Monkeys, and Jared Diamond

By |2019-02-18T02:27:20-06:00November 7th, 2018|Categories: Books, Darwin, Featured, Louis Markos, Modernity|

For the twenty-first-century disciple of Darwin, man—though he possesses no essential, intrinsic worth that separates him from his chimpanzee cousins—has proven himself a most effective destroyer of that very mother nature who evolved him into his present form... The Third Chimpanzee, by Jared Diamond (432 pages, Harper Perennial, 2006) Of the three founding fathers of [...]

Our Enemy: The (Imperial) Presidency

By |2019-11-21T19:44:37-06:00November 5th, 2018|Categories: Books, Civil Society, Democracy, Featured, Federalism, Government, Libertarianism, New Deal, Paul Krause, Presidency, Senior Contributors|

Many Americans fear the dysfunction in Congress and the rise of an “activist” Supreme Court. Both worries are misplaced, at least in relationship to the larger problem at hand: the growth of presidential imperialism… Albert Jay Nock was an important literary and social critic of the first-half of the twentieth century. Part scholar, part pundit, [...]

The Other Founders: The Legacy of Anti-Federalism

By |2019-10-16T13:18:43-06:00November 1st, 2018|Categories: American Founding, American Republic, Books, Constitution, Democracy, Featured, Federalism, John Taylor of Caroline|

To a very great extent, it was the Anti-Federalists, through their rhetoric and writings, who kept alive the spirit of localism and salvaged the great ideal of limited government inherited from the Revolution... The Other Founders: Anti-Federalism and the Dissenting Tradition in America, 1788-1828 by Saul Cornell (University of North Carolina Press, 1999) The Anti-Federalists who [...]

Three Dangerous Philosophical Novels

By |2019-02-18T02:22:55-06:00October 2nd, 2018|Categories: Aldous Huxley, Ayn Rand, Books, C.S. Lewis, Featured, George Orwell, Literature, Philosophy, Walker Percy|

In a culture in which algorithms control the content we consume—what movies to watch, what goods to buy, what news to listen to—the choice to read a book whose philosophy opposes our own and questions our sacred assumptions is nothing short of revolutionary... “I choose novels that let me turn my brain off,” a student [...]

An Emblematic American: The Critical Legacy of Irving Babbitt

By |2019-07-09T14:21:58-06:00August 31st, 2018|Categories: Books, Christian Humanism, Conservatism, Featured, George A. Panichas, Irving Babbitt|

Irving Babbitt was in no way a dogmatic, ossified traditionalist. He was a creative traditionalist: He encouraged renewed expressions of imaginative vision, and he was open to the possibility of a deepening and an expansion of humane knowledge... The Critical Legacy of Irving Babbitt by George A. Panichas (235 pages, Intercollegiate Studies Institute, 1999) I [...]

Imaginative Origins of Modernity: Life as Daydream & Nightmare

By |2019-02-18T02:20:40-06:00August 26th, 2018|Categories: Claes Ryn, Conservatism, Featured, Imagination, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Modernity, Philosophy, Timeless Essays|

Although modernity contains other and contrasting elements, it may be permissible to call the new type of person simply “modern man.” His demeanor is very different from that of premodern man. Far from discounting the opportunities of a worldly existence, this person entertains great expectations… Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords our [...]