20121111_FreemanApril11coverfinalfrontonly3If The Imaginative Conservative readers are interested in the American Civil War, please check out the latest issue of THE FREEMAN (expertly edited by Sheldon Richman).

The April 2011 issue includes articles by Jeff Hummel, Burton Folsom, Joe Stromberg, and yours truly.

http://www.thefreemanonline.org/featured/gaining-a-nation-losing-the-republic-reconstruction-1863–1877/

I’m happy as a clam about this (actually, growing up in Kansas, I have no idea if clams are really happy.  Frankly, I’m skeptical). I’ve wanted to be published in the FREEMAN for nearly thirty years.

Books on the topic of this essay may be found in The Imaginative Conservative BookstoreThe Imaginative Conservative applies the principle of appreciation to the discussion of culture and politics—we approach dialogue with magnanimity rather than with mere civility. Will you help us remain a refreshing oasis in the increasingly contentious arena of modern discourse? Please consider donating now

We hope you will join us in The Imaginative Conservative community. The Imaginative Conservative is an online journal for those who seek the True, the Good, and the Beautiful. We address culture, liberal learning, politics, political economy, literature, the arts, and the American Republic in the tradition of Russell Kirk, T.S. Eliot, Edmund Burke, Irving Babbitt, Wilhelm Roepke, Robert Nisbet, Richard Weaver, M.E. Bradford, Eric Voegelin, Christopher Dawson, Paul Elmer More, and other leaders of Imaginative Conservatism (Visit our Bookstore to find books by/about these men).

We address a wide variety of major issues including: What is the essence of conservatism? What was the role of faith in the American Founding? Is liberal learning still possible in the modern academy? Should conservatives and libertarians be allies? What is the proper role for the American Republic in spreading ordered liberty to other cultures/nations?

The Imaginative Conservative applies the principle of appreciation to the discussion of culture and politics—we approach dialogue with magnanimity rather than with mere civility.

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