Abraham Lincoln: A Western Legacy

By |2021-03-31T15:06:30-05:00March 31st, 2021|Categories: Abraham Lincoln, American West, Books|

Throughout his political career, Abraham Lincoln connected the maintenance of freedom with the preservation of the free West. If the American West fell, so would American liberty. Richard W. Etulain’s “Abraham Lincoln: A Western Legacy” seeks to show more explicitly Lincoln’s relationship with the West. Abraham Lincoln: A Western Legacy by Richard W. Etulain (198 [...]

The Astounding Transformation of Stonewall Jackson

By |2021-01-21T12:20:44-06:00January 21st, 2021|Categories: Books, Civil War, Quotation|

As an instructor at the Virginia Military Institute, Thomas Jonathan Jackson was a poor professor, given to memorizing his lectures and delivering them in a monotone voice to his classes, word-for-word. His students teased him behind his back and fired spitballs at each other during classes, with little fear of their wooden, seemingly hapless teacher. [...]

With Charity For All: What Joe Biden Should Learn From Abe Lincoln

By |2021-01-23T13:45:36-06:00January 19th, 2021|Categories: Abraham Lincoln, American Republic, Joseph Biden, Presidency|

The new president would do well to take a lesson from history’s greatest orator and remind his increasingly diverse constituents that we all share the same uniquely American principles. Freshly sworn in after a contentious election, the new president stands to give his first inaugural address. Violence had begun to erupt immediately after the announcement [...]

Lessons From the American South for Healing Our Nation

By |2020-12-18T09:43:43-06:00December 17th, 2020|Categories: Civil War, South|

After the War Between the States, there was a conscious effort at reconciliation on the part of many in both North and South. This postbellum reconciliation has mostly unraveled, in no small part thanks to conservative establishmentarians who for years have refused to raise a peep—or, in many cases, collaborated—during the leftist campaign against Southern [...]

Arguing With Lincoln: The Views of M.E. Bradford & Richard Weaver

By |2020-09-21T16:43:27-05:00September 21st, 2020|Categories: Abraham Lincoln, Civil War, M. E. Bradford, Richard Weaver|

If for M.E. Bradford, Abraham Lincoln was a gnostic renegade and heretic beyond the pale, he was for Richard Weaver a political and rhetorical father figure with whom one might argue but never condemn. These Southerners’ differing critiques of Lincoln’s person, views, and actions cast some light on this complex figure, one who continues to [...]

Honoring Reconciliation, Not Secession

By |2020-08-11T16:51:29-05:00August 5th, 2020|Categories: Civil Society, Civil War|

The symbolic honor given to Confederate leaders through statuary does not need to be interpreted as racism or an endorsement of slavery. It can also be understood as a process of reconciliation and a refusal to deny the primordial unity of the country. It is peace-making instead of imposing a public memory of defeat and [...]

The Native Americans Who Owned Slaves

By |2020-07-06T17:34:23-05:00July 6th, 2020|Categories: American Republic, Civil War, History, Slavery, War|

Europeans introduced the “Five Civilized Tribes” of the southeast to the institution of racial slavery. And during the Civil War, the Five Civilized Tribes fought on both the Union and Confederate sides. This often-overlooked part of American history takes on new significance in light of today’s debates over slavery reparations and monuments to those who [...]

“Mount Rushmore”

By |2021-04-22T17:34:29-05:00July 6th, 2020|Categories: Abraham Lincoln, American Republic, Audio/Video, George Washington, History, Music, Thomas Jefferson|

Drawing from American musical sources and texts, Michael Dougherty's composition for chorus and orchestra echoes the resonance and dissonance of Mount Rushmore as a complex icon of American history. Like Mount Rushmore, the libretto is carved out of the words of each President. Mount Rushmore (2010) for chorus and orchestra is inspired by the monumental [...]

Nothing But Glory Gained: Pickett’s Charge at Gettysburg

By |2020-06-30T19:10:31-05:00July 2nd, 2020|Categories: Civil War, History, Robert Cheeks, Robert E. Lee, South|

On that summer-hot afternoon at Gettysburg, after two days of fighting in the summer-lush Pennsylvania countryside, the fate of two nations still hung in the balance. General Robert E. Lee intended to tip the scales. Just before 3 o’clock on the morning of July 3, 1863, Robert E. Lee rose by starlight, ate a spartan [...]

“Stand Watie”

By |2020-06-23T17:32:54-05:00June 23rd, 2020|Categories: Audio/Video, Civil War, Music|

Stand Watie (Cherokee: ᏕᎦᏔᎦ, romanized: Degataga, lit. 'Stand firm') (December 12, 1806 – September 9, 1871), also known as Standhope Uwatie, Tawkertawker, and Isaac S. Watie, was a leader of the Cherokee Nation. They allied with the Confederacy, and he was the only Native American to attain a general's rank in the Civil War, Confederacy [...]

Cancelling America’s Founders

By |2020-06-16T06:27:22-05:00June 16th, 2020|Categories: Civil Society, Pat Buchanan, Robert E. Lee, Western Civilization|

George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, and Robert E. Lee were among the decisive figures of American history. If all are dishonored, with their statues pulled down and their names taken off cities, counties, towns, rivers, canals, bridges, buildings, highways, roads, streets and dams, then what is left? "Can we all just get along?" That was the [...]

Was the Civil War Only About Slavery?

By |2020-06-14T17:26:12-05:00June 14th, 2020|Categories: American Republic, Books, Civil War, History, Slavery, War|

As Samuel W. Mitcham, Jr. rightly points out in his new book, there is no denying that there were other questions besides the issue of slavery energizing the air prior to the War Between the States, questions which cannot be entirely trivialized. It Wasn’t About Slavery: Exposing the Great Lie of the Civil War, by [...]

The Richard Weaver-Abraham Lincoln Debate

By |2020-06-01T19:06:06-05:00June 1st, 2020|Categories: Abraham Lincoln, Civil War, Conservatism, Literature, Reason, Richard Weaver, South|

For some time I had puzzled over a discrepancy or inconsistency between two of Richard Weaver’s essays which treat of Lincoln to one degree or another. In his “Abraham Lincoln and the Argument from Definition” (1953), Weaver praises Lincoln as a “conservative” by virtue of his employment of the argument from definition on such issues [...]

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