Civil War

Alexander Stephens & the “Cornerstone Speech”

By |2019-08-12T14:07:19-05:00August 12th, 2019|Categories: American Republic, Civil War, Equality, Government, History, Politics, Secession, Slavery, South, War|

History is complex, messy, and unyielding to our dearest wishes for easy categorization. That Alexander Stephens understood the Confederacy through its cornerstone of slavery is plainly true and explained in his own words. But the “Cornerstone Speech” goes further, planting the other corners of the Confederate state in concerns over federalism and sovereignty. Anxious [...]

Boyd Cathey’s “The Land We Love” as an Admonition to My Co-Religionists

By |2019-08-02T23:09:38-05:00August 2nd, 2019|Categories: American Republic, Catholicism, Christianity, Civil War, Politics, South, War|

Under advanced liberalism there is an expectation that anybody who so much as dares to speak civilly to or about any figure associated with the Confederacy is to be deemed persona non grata. For Catholics as Catholics, such sweeping and absolutist expectations are simply unacceptable. Forth from its scabbard, high in the air Beneath [...]

Lord Acton and the American Civil War

By |2019-02-07T12:32:08-05:00February 7th, 2019|Categories: American Republic, Civil War, Classical Liberalism, History, John C. Calhoun, South|

Lord Acton believed that the wrong side won the American Civil War. Such a judgment could hardly be said to be a minor detail of someone’s historical worldview, yet this judgment has somehow been obscured… “Power tends to corrupt; absolute power corrupts absolutely.” Among Catholic students of political thought, few figures are more liable [...]

Robert E. Lee Reconsidered

By |2019-02-06T23:14:15-05:00February 6th, 2019|Categories: Robert E. Lee|

Clearly, Robert E. Lee’s reputation has plummeted from the lofty height it once occupied. It is time to clear a path through the rubble of toppled statues and discarded plaques to examine the qualities of the authentic Lee, as well as the turn of mind that would relegate him to historical ignominy... I. “What excellence is [...]

The First Shots of the Civil War: The Star of the West

By |2018-11-14T23:30:37-05:00November 13th, 2018|Categories: American Republic, Bradley Birzer Fort Sumter Series, Bradley J. Birzer, Civil War, Constitution, History, Senior Contributors, War|

The Union soldiers defending Forts Sumter and Moultrie in Charleston Harbor had come to believe that their honor, as well as the honor of the Constitution and the federal government, was at stake... Star of the West Shortly after dawn, around 6 am, on January 9, 1861, Captain Abner Doubleday spotted a steamer [...]

The Attack on Memory

By |2019-07-29T14:14:30-05:00June 21st, 2018|Categories: American Republic, Andrew Lytle, Civil Society, Richard Weaver, Robert E. Lee, South|

History is the “remembered past,” remembered according to values and virtues that are the inheritance of a particular people. The story as told gives meaning to the “facts,” and the story must be told to be remembered… “Remember therefore from whence thou art fallen, and repent, and do the first works; or else I [...]

A Requiem for Manners

By |2019-05-09T12:12:24-05:00June 17th, 2018|Categories: Christianity, Conservatism, Culture, Edmund Burke, History, Robert E. Lee, Stephen M. Klugewicz, Timeless Essays, Virtue|

Christian chivalry harmonized human relations. Without it, society could only be held together by brute force and cold reason. Gone would be the warmth of considerate human relations, corrupted would be the morals of men, and all would be reduced to slaves… Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords our readers the opportunity [...]

The Good Man’s Bad Cause: A Lesson From “Julius Caesar”

By |2019-03-07T10:46:22-05:00May 22nd, 2018|Categories: History, Robert E. Lee, William Shakespeare|

In Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar, Brutus, the noblest Roman of them all, ends his life working with people he cannot respect, haunted by visions of the friend he has murdered, and in a cause that fails and deserves to fail… The man fighting for a bad cause is always in a hurry, chased by the guilt of [...]

In Search of the Real Abraham Lincoln

By |2018-05-17T23:42:30-05:00May 17th, 2018|Categories: Abraham Lincoln, Christianity, History, Myth, Presidency, South|

For many, Abraham Lincoln became a symbolic Christ, for some, perhaps, more than symbolic. They could scarcely help themselves, the parallels were so striking. He was the savior of the Union, God’s chosen instrument for bringing the millennium to suffering humanity, born in a log cabin (close enough to a stable), son of a [...]

Statesmanship and the Dangers of Civil Religion

By |2019-03-11T15:13:39-05:00May 13th, 2018|Categories: Abraham Lincoln, Bruce Frohnen, Christianity, Culture, Government, Politics, Religion, Timeless Essays|

Demands for statesmanship tend to hold up a model of greatness in political leadership that is profoundly dangerous. The desire to be “great” by upholding the interests of the nation as a political whole promotes a massive increase in the extent and centralization of political power… Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords [...]

Ten Things You Don’t Know About Robert E. Lee

By |2018-04-10T01:10:22-05:00April 8th, 2018|Categories: Robert E. Lee, Stephen M. Klugewicz|

To those Americans who revere him—sadly, a dwindling number these days—Robert E. Lee is still much a "Marble Man": the noble face of the antebellum South, the tragic embodiment of the Lost Cause, the "perfect" man, as a contemporary deemed him. Even his admirers are unaware of the some of the more interesting details of [...]

The Elements of Academic Success

By |2019-02-07T12:56:25-05:00February 2nd, 2018|Categories: Books, Civil War, Conservatism, Education, South|

Gene Kizer’s practical advice and his notations of political correctness and anti-Southern bias make The Elements of Academic Success an ideal purchase for any current or potential college student, especially those of a conservative and pro-Southern bent… The Elements of Academic Success by Gene Kizer, Jr. (364 pages, Charleston Athenaeum Press, 2014) I wish I had [...]