Jacob Howland

About Jacob Howland

Jacob Howland's essays have appeared in The New Criterion, City Journal, The Claremont Review of Books, The Jewish Review of Books, Commentary, and The Nation. His most recent book is Glaucon's Fate: History, Myth, and Character in Plato's Republic (Paul Dry Books, 2018).

Glaucon’s Fate: History, Myth, and Character in Plato’s “Republic”

By |2020-05-14T18:09:03-05:00May 14th, 2020|Categories: Books, Character, Culture, History, Myth, Philosophy, Plato, Socrates|

Glaucon’s story is part of a well-known political tragedy that swept up many of Plato’s friends and fellow citizens, including Socrates. The evidence for his personal tragedy, however, is deeply embedded in the text. Like a three-dimensional image hidden within a two-dimensional picture, it requires a special adjustment of the eyes to perceive. Perhaps [...]

University Administration and the English Language

By |2020-05-06T09:14:17-05:00May 6th, 2020|Categories: Culture, Education, George Orwell, Language, Modernity|

Learning and language are intimately related. People speak well—clearly, concretely, and accurately—about the things they know, and poorly when they pontificate about things they don’t. Broadly-educated people speak well about many things; they are dilettantes rather than pedants, the two kinds of intellectual according to Miguel de Unamuno. Primo Levi, a professional chemist as [...]

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