Virgil on Courage

By |2019-05-14T16:11:35-05:00May 14th, 2019|Categories: Aeneas, Character, Heroism, Imagination, Letters From Dante Series, Louis Markos, Senior Contributors, Virgil|

Author’s Introduction: Imagine if Homer, Virgil, Dante, Chaucer, and the other great poets of ancient Greece, Rome, and the Middle Ages had been given the gift, not only to peer into the twenty-first century, but to correspond with we who live in that most confusing and rudderless of centuries. Had it been in their [...]

A Letter to the Seniors

By |2019-05-07T21:33:50-05:00May 7th, 2019|Categories: Character, Culture, Glenn Arbery, Senior Contributors, T.S. Eliot, Tradition, Virtue, Wyoming Catholic College|

T.S. Eliot reaches into the unsaid, perhaps even into the ultimately unsayable, in a way that makes new possibilities present for those of his own time. Eliot comes out of the great tradition, the long conversation of the West, which is now your own earned inheritance as well. What will you do with it? [...]

Mentors and Rites of Passage

By |2019-04-30T16:09:41-05:00May 3rd, 2019|Categories: Character, Community, Glenn Arbery, Senior Contributors, Wisdom, Wyoming Catholic College|

The good mentor is virtually inseparable from the phenomenon of initiation that has always been understood as a crucial part of the rite of passage between one condition in life to another, a new and deeper community. In an age where mentors and rites of passage are being neglected, we should not forget the [...]

Composers and Wine

By |2019-04-11T22:23:27-05:00April 11th, 2019|Categories: Character, Culture, History, Music|

As a wine professional and classically trained musician, I’ve always wanted to know if wine was important in the lives of the great composers. Did Bach, Mozart, or Beethoven enjoy wine daily? Did they keep a cellar? Did they write about the wines they drank? I’ve never been able to find much about the [...]

Bob Kane and Bill Finger: Batman’s Creators

By |2019-05-03T11:24:01-05:00April 5th, 2019|Categories: Batman Series, Bradley J. Birzer, Character, History, Senior Contributors, Superheroes|

Though somewhat disputed as to just how much each person contributed to the creation of the character and backstory of The Batman, both Robert Kane (born Robert Kahn; 1915-1998), as credited in the first story, and Milton Bill Finger (1914-1974), not credited, invented the character. The two had actually teamed up during the several [...]

Batman and the Rise of the American Superhero

By |2019-04-05T14:00:06-05:00March 29th, 2019|Categories: Batman Series, Bradley J. Birzer, Character, Heroism, History, Senior Contributors, Western Civilization|

Against the suffocating world of Nazism, communism, Holocaust camps, and gulags, imagination found a new life in the 1940s and 1950s, as artists strove for a renewal of beauty, goodness, and truth. It is only in this context that one can understand the rise of the “superhero,” among whom none have endured as well [...]

Andrew Jackson Unconquered

By |2019-03-14T22:48:45-05:00March 14th, 2019|Categories: American West, Character, History, Politics|

Andrew Jackson’s reputation is drifting down, down, down, like a sere autumn leaf. Whereas in 1948, the first year of Arthur Schlesinger Sr.’s poll of historians, Old Hickory ranked sixth among the presidents, in recent surveys by a variety of sponsors he has dropped into the midteens. It seems only a matter of time [...]

Conflicted But Redeemed: James Como’s Life of C.S Lewis

By |2019-03-11T23:38:21-05:00March 11th, 2019|Categories: Books, Bradley J. Birzer, C.S. Lewis, Character, Senior Contributors|

James Como’s C.S Lewis: A Very Short Introduction is delightful and is the single finest biographical survey yet written on the Oxford don. In a little more than one hundred pages, you’ll happily come to know the complexities of the most famous convert to Christianity in the twentieth century. C.S. Lewis: A Very Short Introduction, [...]

Surprised by Jack

By |2019-02-26T20:44:19-05:00February 25th, 2019|Categories: Books, Bradley J. Birzer, C.S. Lewis, Character, Christianity, Literature, Senior Contributors|

C.S. Lewis’s writings are endlessly fascinating because the man himself was endlessly fascinating—to himself as well as to others. He saw life as a sort of drama and art, one in which the will shapes what Providence has so generously provided. One can readily and happily delve into C.S. Lewis’s autobiography of 1955, Surprised [...]

The Dangers of Russophobia

By |2019-02-27T13:37:45-05:00February 24th, 2019|Categories: Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Character, Communism, Government, Joseph Pearce, Political Philosophy, Politics, Russia, Senior Contributors|

We should not confuse or conflate Russian President Vladimir Putin with Soviet leaders, such as Josef Stalin. They are as different as the proverbial chalk and cheese. Nowhere is this more evident than the way in which Mr. Putin has shown himself to be a great admirer of the anti-Soviet dissident, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn. The Special [...]

Pillars of Liberty: The Moral Virtues

By |2019-02-22T15:26:25-05:00February 21st, 2019|Categories: Audio/Video, Character, Civil Society, Education, Liberal Learning, Louis Markos, Virtue|

Dr. Louis Markos explains how the problem in today's education is not that virtue is forgotten, but that only certain "pseudo-virtues" are being taught. We're raising a generation of people who say, "Well, yeah, I do sleep around. But I recycle cans and so it's okay." We've thrown out the sins against morality and replaced [...]

Freedom’s Flaw in “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel”

By |2019-02-09T14:24:15-05:00February 8th, 2019|Categories: Character, Culture, Freedom, Morality, Responsibility, Television, Tragedy, Virtue|

Mrs. Maisel must decide, like all other men and women who follow a path that separates them from their family, home, gods, and city, whether the allure of a life in the spotlight and the total freedom it promises is preferable to, or reconcilable with, the many good things she risks turning away from… [...]