Victimology 101: Rousseau, Victimhood, and Safe-Spaces

By |2019-04-06T00:36:24-05:00April 5th, 2019|

Many liberals maintain that they themselves are victims. Where does this belief come from? And why would anyone want to be a victim? To understand the origins of victimhood, we must understand the work and thought of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, the godfather and patron saint of liberalism… Candace Owens, an African American woman, is a [...]

The Madness of Jacques Derrida

By |2019-04-05T16:22:57-05:00April 1st, 2019|

In Of Grammatology, Jacques Derrida’s prose functions as a deadly siren call; he appeals to the contradictions of language, summoning the reader to see in his thought a new system of thought never before brought before man. Just as with the Homeric sirens, however, following Derrida’s thought leads to destruction. Of Grammatology, by Jacques Derrida [...]

I Call You Friends

By |2019-03-21T15:08:02-05:00March 21st, 2019|

What exactly is friendship? It’s a crucial question, one of the most important any of us will ever face—personally, politically, or theologically. But when do we ever, as adults, get a chance to think such a question through, especially in a context that allows friendship to blossom? In the ancient world, friendship was a high [...]

Nietzsche and the Short Nineteenth Century

By |2019-03-15T20:51:53-05:00March 18th, 2019|

As Christopher Dawson argued, the nineteenth century proved a short century. When the century began, Thomas Jefferson delivered his gorgeous blueprint for a liberal republican world in the form of the first inaugural address. “But every difference of opinion is not a difference of principle. We have called by different names brethren of the [...]

Behold the Demon: Nietzsche as Destroyer

By |2019-03-15T21:01:56-05:00March 15th, 2019|

Friedrich Nietzche’s Ecce Homo lays waste to centuries of an ethic of inhibition and restraint. Intellectually brutalized, bloodied, and tortured, the nineteenth-century philosopher presented himself in his final and last words to a world he wanted to overthrow. Behold the man. To be more accurate, behold the demon. In his mockingly titled autobiography and final published [...]

John Locke on “The Reasonableness of Christianity”

By |2019-03-15T20:59:46-05:00March 14th, 2019|

A primary theme that runs throughout The Reasonableness of Christianity is John Locke’s belief that men who attempt to understand natural law and morality through their faculty of reason alone often fail at their task. But why is it that reason alone, also according to Locke, can explain Revelation? The question this essay poses might seem somewhat [...]

The Beauty Contest

By |2019-02-25T09:23:38-05:00February 22nd, 2019|

The beauty contest illustrates the difficulty with the term for and maybe the very idea of gentlemanliness—are good and beautiful two criteria or one? If they are two, how are they related? Could the beautiful be whatever compellingly attracts? Furthermore, what is truly and justly compelling? Editor’s Note: This essay is part of a series dedicated [...]

The Tyranny of History

By |2019-02-21T23:44:50-05:00February 21st, 2019|

Those who weaponize history and language to fit their ideological vision know no boundaries in any matters. Enthralled by the phantoms of their psyche, they become the blind tyrants who destroy this real world for the fantasy of their world to come… It has become customary for moderns to hear the phrase “the right [...]

Speech and Silence

By |2019-02-14T22:05:14-05:00February 14th, 2019|

Through language, humans bring out the full potentiality hidden in matter, advance the building of bird nests and beaver dams to architecture and engineering, the gathering of nuts to farming, squawks and barks to music, and limited animal perception to the intellectual jewels of modern Western culture… In the history of science, the only [...]

Blaise Pascal: The Mathematical and the Intuitive Mind

By |2019-02-01T10:53:24-05:00January 31st, 2019|

Blaise Pascal’s argument in favor of Christianity was simple: Faith is so perceptible, even so palpable, to the intuition that man needs only to be in the world to realize that there must be more. Christianity has a direct connection to the heart; as Pascal said, “the heart has its reasons, which reason does not know”... [...]

Humanity Dehumanized: Hegel’s Reflections on the Enlightenment & the French Revolution

By |2019-01-20T22:27:17-05:00January 21st, 2019|

The Enlightenment, that is modern reason, failed us in part, Hegel shows, both for the history it left behind and the legacy it bequeathed us. Indeed it brought us and spirit to the point of self-destruction... Editor's Note: This essay is part of a series dedicated to Senior Contributor Dr. Eva Brann of St. John’s College, Annapolis, in [...]

Self Addressed Speech: The Soul Speaking to Itself

By |2019-01-20T21:06:07-05:00January 21st, 2019|

Ask anyone what speech “is for” and the answer will be, “Speech is for communication.” To be sure. But not primarily! Speech is first for self-address... My first title for this little musing was “Silent Speech.” That, however, turned out to be inaccurate. As I thought out what had set me wondering about this strange [...]

On the Meaning of “Be Yourself”

By |2019-01-04T21:17:04-05:00January 4th, 2019|

It may seem paradoxical to find out that one of the great clarion calls of individuality, modernism, and liberality—“Be yourself”—turns out to be a profound declaration of classical ethics… “Stay true. Be you.” “Stay true to yourself.” “Be who you are.” “Just be yourself.” “You do you.” These slogans are part of the fundamental [...]

Thomas More on Conscience, Courage, & the Comedy of Politics

By |2018-12-29T23:53:15-05:00December 29th, 2018|

As the gulf between classical and postmodern notions of conscience and government grows ever wider and their clashes more explosive, it is high time for the jury to give renewed attention to the nuances of Thomas More’s understanding of the apparently competing, but ultimately harmonious, demands of divine, natural, and human law… In August of 1534 Margaret [...]