George Santayana and the Ironies of Liberalism

By |2020-04-06T12:07:25-05:00April 7th, 2020|Categories: Conservatism, Liberalism, Philosophy, Political Philosophy, Politics|

The question—is liberalism a self-defeating enterprise?—has gained traction over the last couple of years. Even as far back as 1921, the Spanish-American philosopher George Santayana dedicated time to this topic in the form of an essay he titled “The Irony of Liberalism.” In this brief work, Santayana explored prevalent themes that emerged throughout liberalism’s [...]

When the Panic Becomes Policy, Wisdom Must Step In

By |2020-03-29T17:45:42-05:00March 29th, 2020|Categories: Coronavirus, Economics, Imagination, John Horvat, Josef Pieper, Moral Imagination, Philosophy, Politics, Wisdom|

When set in motion, panic does not care what is in the way of its mad flight. All must be sacrificed—economy, society, and even worship—in the name of irrational fear. Moreover, it proves difficult to stop. What is missing in our reaction to the coronavirus pandemic is wisdom. In the face of the coronavirus [...]

Motion, Moments, & Sculptural Art: The Imagination and Time

By |2020-03-28T18:25:26-05:00March 28th, 2020|Categories: Christianity, Imagination, Philosophy, Religion, Theology, Time|

The imagination allows the human experience to be of both motion and stability, both becoming and being—but could it be that contained in our experience of time is an experience of divine nature? In his Consolation of Philosophy, Boethius writes that “the infinite motion of temporal things tries to imitate the ever present immobility [...]

Discerning the Spirits: Gerhart Niemeyer as Culture Critic

By |2020-02-27T14:33:40-06:00March 4th, 2020|Categories: Art, Christian Humanism, Culture, Gerhart Niemeyer, Gregory Wolfe, Literature, Philosophy|

With Aristotle, Gerhart Niemeyer saw art as being closer to philosophy than to history. Like philosophy, art begins and ends in wonder—it promotes a deeper sense of the mystery that bounds our experience. In the great works of art and literature, the relationship between art and religion is that of a seamless garment, and [...]

The Speechless Image

By |2020-02-27T10:51:51-06:00February 27th, 2020|Categories: Art, Culture, Modernity, Philosophy, Worldview|

What can be said of the way that the abstract work speaks to us—despite the fact that its “content” is untranslatable into words and concepts—is that in its very inability to speak, the work expresses the sense of alienation from a once-familiar and shared artistic life-world. Is the avant-garde then a tragedy or a [...]

Henri Lefebvre and the Urban Revolution

By |2020-02-21T11:39:24-06:00February 21st, 2020|Categories: Capitalism, Conservatism, Economics, Philosophy|

A sociologist born at the turn of the twentieth century, Henri Lefebvre is a figure whose writings shed light on questions pertaining to rural life versus urban life, theories of the state, modernity, and the role of social space and markets in cities. Beyond sociology, he is considered an important figure in both urban [...]

Charles Peguy on the Hubris of Modernism

By |2020-02-20T16:46:35-06:00February 19th, 2020|Categories: Christianity, Culture, Modernity, Philosophy|

In Western society we are so immersed in and surrounded by the philosophy of modernism, that many are hardly aware of it. Modernism may present itself in various forms. Most recently, some aspects of it seem to have appeared among clergy in the Vatican. It is, therefore, relevant to revisit Charles Peguy’s hard-hitting critique [...]

Aristotle’s Revenge

By |2020-02-18T15:32:23-06:00February 18th, 2020|Categories: Aristotle, Books, Imagination, Philosophy, Truth|

Insights into the nature of Aristotle’s philosophy confirm Edward Feser’s detailed argument that Aristotle, under the gentle care of later scholastically-minded thinkers, turns out to be right about more things than most of us dare hope. Aristotle’s Revenge: The Metaphysical Foundations of Physical and Biological Science, by Edward Feser (Editiones Scholasticae, 515 pages, 2019) [...]

The Original Perversity in the Socialist Heart

By |2020-02-19T00:05:53-06:00February 18th, 2020|Categories: Conservatism, History, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Liberalism, Politics, Socialism|

Socialism’s nuances and ideological subtleties can be latent, unknown, and often unrecognizable. To truly grasp the depth of the socialists’ arguments, we must first look at socialism’s ideological origins—specifically, Jean Rousseau’s invalidation of Original Sin. As socialism ascends in prominence, many of its proponents are open and outspoken with their socialist political positions. These [...]

On the Fear of Religion

By |2020-02-15T11:44:04-06:00February 15th, 2020|Categories: Atheism, Blaise Pascal, Christianity, Culture, Philosophy, Religion, Senior Contributors, Theology|

Blaise Pascal wrote that men hate religion and “are afraid it is true.” But can we agree with him? Some have made clear a hatred for it, but do they fear it? And what about the wider culture? Do people today, generally speaking, fear religion? The renowned physicist Stephen Hawking once heckled that the [...]

Natural Law and Our Constitutional Crisis

By |2020-02-03T02:39:43-06:00February 2nd, 2020|Categories: Constitution, Natural Law|

In the coming debates over the nation’s future, a return to natural law is the most secure way to fight against the legal chaos that has destroyed the rule of law. We must explore natural law notions of self-defense, private property, and even national sovereignty. This law will direct us to God, who made both [...]