Audio/Video

Glory to Dido! The Operas of Hector Berlioz

By |2019-12-11T01:30:39-06:00December 10th, 2019|Categories: Audio/Video, Hector Berlioz, Hector Berlioz Sesquicentennial Series, Music, Stephen M. Klugewicz|

"They are finally going to play my music." —Hector Berlioz, on his deathbed Though Hector Berlioz's operas are still little known today—even to the opera-going public, who are much more likely to find the dramas of Verdi, Puccini, Bellini, and Mozart on the program—the increasing recognition of their many glories is slowly making them less [...]

A Thanksgiving Tale of Redemption: “Planes, Trains and Automobiles”

By |2019-11-28T19:29:02-06:00November 27th, 2019|Categories: Audio/Video, Film, Stephen M. Klugewicz, Thanksgiving, Timeless Essays|

A lighthearted romp at first blush, “Planes, Trains and Automobiles” yet tells the story of how the example of simple goodness can be transformational… Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords our readers the opportunity to join Stephen Klugewicz, as he discusses the humanity of the 1980s John Hughes comedy, Planes, Trains and Automobiles.—W. [...]

“Chasin’ Wild Horses”

By |2019-11-14T11:35:32-06:00November 12th, 2019|Categories: Audio/Video, Bruce Springsteen, Music|

Bruce Springsteen's "Chasin' Wild Horses" was released on his 2019 album "Western Stars," a set of songs told from the viewpoint of an older man, about remembrance, regret, and the search for redemption in the American West. The album marks a musical departure for Mr. Springsteen, as it features a classical chamber orchestral and a [...]

Candles Behind the Wall

By |2019-11-09T17:02:21-06:00November 8th, 2019|Categories: Audio/Video, Barbara J. Elliott, Christianity, Communism, Freedom, History, Politics, Senior Contributors|

Barbara J. Elliott remembers the fall of the Berlin Wall, and draws attention to the individuals who, through faith and love, made this momentous event possible. Having interviewed many of those who were imprisoned, beaten, ostracized, and forced underground during the rule of the communist regime, Professor Elliott tells with passion the stories of the [...]

The Halloween-ness of Berlioz’s “Symphonie Fantastique”

By |2019-11-14T13:48:19-06:00October 30th, 2019|Categories: Audio/Video, Halloween, Hector Berlioz, Hector Berlioz Sesquicentennial Series|

It’s October, Halloween is approaching and I am obsessed with Berlioz’s Symphonie fantastique. Blame it on the title and mood of the symphony’s fifth movement: “Dream of a Witches’ Sabbath.” Could any title be more deliciously spooky? It’s this movement, and this symphony, that make classical music people nod in recognition at the sound of Hector Berlioz’s [...]

“Chant Sacré”

By |2019-11-14T11:13:04-06:00October 11th, 2019|Categories: Audio/Video, Hector Berlioz, Music|

Hector Berlioz wrote the Chant Sacré (Sacred Song) in 1829, using re-using a melody he had employed in his cantata of the previous year, Herminie. Berlioz went on to create three arrangements for this gorgeous and brief piece: for choir and piano; for chorus and orchestra; and, in 1844, a version for six wind instruments. [...]

“Into the Fire”

By |2019-11-14T13:06:02-06:00September 10th, 2019|Categories: Audio/Video, Bruce Springsteen, Music|

Editor's Note: In the days after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, Bruce Springsteen, who had watched the smoking devastation of lower Manhattan from a point across the river in New Jersey, and who had lost friends as the World Trade Center towers crumbled, was in Rumson, when a passing driver yelled at him: [...]

“Factory”

By |2019-11-14T13:22:04-06:00September 2nd, 2019|Categories: Audio/Video, Bruce Springsteen, Labor/Work, Music|

Early in the morning factory whistle blows Man rises from bed and puts on his clothes Man takes his lunch, walks out in the morning light It's the working, the working, just the working life Through the mansions of fear, through the mansions of pain I see my daddy walking through them factory gates in [...]

Berlioz and Shakespeare

By |2019-12-10T15:46:49-06:00August 15th, 2019|Categories: Audio/Video, Hector Berlioz, Hector Berlioz Sesquicentennial Series, Music, Stephen M. Klugewicz|

From his first experience of "Hamlet" in 1827 to his death in 1869, Hector Berlioz found William Shakespeare's plays to be an ongoing source of almost-divine inspiration for his music. Indeed, Berlioz's love for "the father of artists" led to the creation of what many consider to be his greatest work: the dramatic symphony, "Roméo [...]

Arvo Pärt’s Mystical, Mesmerizing “Fratres for Strings & Percussion”

By |2019-11-19T13:05:49-06:00July 26th, 2019|Categories: Arvo Pärt, Audio/Video, Culture, Music|

In Arvo Pärt’s “Fratres” there seem to be all sorts of emotions simmering just below the surface. Dense, big, life-and-death emotions. Ancient spirituality. All of it affects you at such a gut level. It’s majestic. It’s minimalist. Mr. Pärt’s spirituality, his philosophy, is there, tucked invisibly into the music. There is something about going [...]

The Boston Classicists: America’s Pioneering Composers

By |2019-11-19T13:06:27-06:00July 18th, 2019|Categories: Audio/Video, Culture, Michael De Sapio, Music, Senior Contributors|

Together, four men and one woman—the Boston Classicists—brought American music to a level of sophistication it had never had before. Not only did they become the most highly respected composers in America, but their music was also heard abroad to great applause. In her early years America had the reputation, at least among sophisticated [...]

We Hold These Truths: Thoughts on the U.S. Constitution

By |2019-11-14T14:53:37-06:00July 15th, 2019|Categories: Audio/Video, Constitution, St. John's College|

Editor's Note: What is the duty of government? What are the rights of man in a civilized society? What is the purpose of law? Mortimer Adler, scholar of, and advocate for, the Great Books, attempts to answer these questions and more in the following interview. Interposed with scenes of discussion from a seminar conducted at [...]