Was the Postwar U.S. International Order Truly Liberal?

By |2021-04-26T19:52:25-05:00April 25th, 2021|Categories: American Republic, Books, Foreign Affairs, History, Liberal, Politics, World War II|

“The False Promise of Liberal Order” and “Tomorrow, the World” provide a useful two-dose vaccine against the now-viral view that something ambitious must be done to repair and revitalize the fraying liberal international order. Both books counsel against doubling down on a postwar order that was more imperial than liberal. The False Promise of Liberal [...]

A Mother’s Tale: Hilda van Stockum’s “The Winged Watchman”

By |2021-03-25T12:03:45-05:00March 26th, 2021|Categories: Books, Catholicism, David Deavel, Fiction, Senior Contributors, World War II|

The sharp focus on Mrs. Verhagen gives “The Winged Watchman,” Hilda van Stockum’s novel about a Dutch family during World War II, such power. The close-up tasks of the women are just as heroic as the tasks of the men who often fought to protect their loved ones. Who knew a great war story would [...]

The Liberation of Auschwitz: Playing the Blame Game

By |2021-03-24T08:08:06-05:00March 25th, 2021|Categories: History, Joseph Pearce, Russia, Senior Contributors, War, World War II|

It is necessary for President Vladimir Putin to restore his previous and proper focus on what it means to be Russian in the twenty-first century. At the heart of this healthy focus is the absolute necessity of Russia separating herself psychologically from the Soviet Union. On January 27, 1945, advancing Soviet troops liberated Auschwitz concentration [...]

Roosevelt’s Folly: Robert Nisbet’s Second World War

By |2021-01-25T16:07:45-06:00January 25th, 2021|Categories: History, Robert Nisbet, War, World War II|

From the beginning of their friendship, Franklin D. Roosevelt could not see Joseph Stalin as anything other than an ally, an anti-imperialist and proto-democrat, representing all that was modern and rational and equalitarian. Robert Nisbet concludes that Roosevelt’s arrogant blindness was the key to Soviet mischief. World War II—especially the European theatre—intrigued Robert A. Nisbet [...]

“Day of Infamy Speech”

By |2020-12-07T06:41:06-06:00December 6th, 2020|Categories: Audio/Video, Presidency, Primary Documents, World War II|

President Franklin D. Roosevelt delivered the following speech to a Joint Session of the United States Congress on December 8, 1941, one day after the Empire of Japan's attack on the U.S. naval base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Though Roosevelt referred to December 7th as a "date which will live in infamy," the speech itself [...]

“Triumph of the Will”: The Culture of Death on Screen

By |2020-09-03T00:11:08-05:00September 3rd, 2020|Categories: Culture, Death, Europe, Film, History, War, World War II|

Commissioned by Adolf Hitler, “Triumph of the Will” is a terrifying film. It is as if, for a moment, something infernal took control of the camera and caused the audience to be entranced, as it projected a lie into Germany’s consciousness, and then beyond to an unwilling world. As a consequence, 85 million people were [...]

The Untold Story of Japan’s Atomic Bomb

By |2020-09-02T23:51:17-05:00September 2nd, 2020|Categories: Books, World War II|

Had the Japanese succeeded in their last-ditch atomic effort, the world’s history might have been very different. By August 1945, Japan had abandoned the idea of bombing mainland America. Instead, Japanese leaders were planning to use what atomic weapons they could produce on the Allied invasion fleet that they believed would soon be off its [...]

“Their Finest Hour”: The Legendary Speech

By |2020-06-17T16:22:46-05:00June 17th, 2020|Categories: History, War, Winston Churchill, World War II|

On June 18, 1940, two days after France had sought an armistice with Germany, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill addressed the House of Commons about the calamitous turn of events in Europe. Britain now stood alone against Adolf Hitler’s military machine, and in this speech, Churchill bolsters his countrymen’s courage to fight for freedom and [...]

“These Are the Boys of Pointe Du Hoc”: D-Day Speech

By |2020-06-05T22:20:44-05:00June 5th, 2020|Categories: American Republic, Politics, Ronald Reagan, War, World War II|

On June 6, 1984—the 40th anniversary of D-Day—President Ronald Reagan delivered a speech to an audience of D-Day veterans and world leaders commemorating the lost and living heroes. He stood at the site of the U.S. Ranger Monument at Pointe du Hoc on the northern coast of France where Allied soldiers had courageously charged ashore. [...]

Churchill and Prudence: Actions at Mers el-Kebir

By |2020-06-05T13:46:41-05:00June 5th, 2020|Categories: England, War, Winston Churchill, World War II|

Winston Churchill’s leadership through World War Two led the United Kingdom to victory against Nazi Germany. His decision at Mers el-Kebir is a clear example of statesmanship, one worth study and imitation. Winston S. Churchill demonstrated statesmanship, prudence, and determination in the destruction of the French Fleet at Oran. Prime Minister Churchill sat at the [...]

“The Dreaded Blueness:” The Influenza Pandemic of 1918-1919

By |2020-05-10T14:47:33-05:00May 10th, 2020|Categories: Coronavirus, Culture, History, Mark Malvasi, Senior Contributors, War, World War I, World War II|

The Spanish Flu had arisen without warning and was especially virulent. It challenged established knowledge about the nature of such diseases, killing not the young and the old, but instead men and women who were in the prime of life. Not only did doctors struggle to treat it, but they were also at a loss [...]

Victory in Europe!

By |2020-05-08T10:52:40-05:00May 8th, 2020|Categories: Audio/Video, World War II|

From British Movietone: "V E Day began with Mr Churchill's broadcast officially announcing the end of war in Europe. Londoners took to the streets in celebrations which continued for nearly two days. Outside Buckingham Palace the crowds chanted 'we want the King' and were rewarded by the Royal Family appearing on the balcony. At nine [...]

Reminiscences of the Dutch Liberation: May 5, 1945

By |2020-05-04T17:36:11-05:00May 4th, 2020|Categories: Christianity, Culture, Europe, History, Michael De Sapio, Senior Contributors, War, World War II|

It is now 75 years since the Allies freed the Netherlands from the clutches of the Nazis, yet my neighbor Christina (“Stien”) van Egmond remembers the events with amazing clarity. Ms. Stien was 16 at the time and, having graduated from high school several months previously, was working in her father’s greengrocery in Diemen, a [...]

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