Tolkien and Lewis Under the Christmas Tree

By |2020-12-14T10:32:39-06:00December 14th, 2020|Categories: Books, C.S. Lewis, Christian Humanism, Gifts for Imaginative Conservatives, J.R.R. Tolkien, Louis Markos, Senior Contributors|

With a seemingly (and thankfully) endless supply of books about J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis flowing out from every conceivable press, it is easy to overlook some hidden gems. To assist Imaginative Conservative readers with their Christmas book shopping, I have highlighted below some books about Lewis and/or Tolkien that have been published over [...]

A Friend and Faithful Servant of C.S. Lewis: Memories of Walter Hooper

By |2020-12-11T14:28:00-06:00December 14th, 2020|Categories: C.S. Lewis, Catholicism, Christian Humanism, Joseph Pearce, Senior Contributors|

Having passed away recently, Lewis scholar Walter Hooper will be missed, but we can well believe that he is now once more with C.S. Lewis, whom he had served most faithfully for so many years, in a place in which it is never winter but always Christmas. With the passing of Walter Hooper on [...]

Surprised by Jack

By |2020-11-28T21:35:13-06:00November 28th, 2020|Categories: Books, Bradley J. Birzer, C.S. Lewis, Character, Christianity, Literature, Senior Contributors, Timeless Essays|

C.S. Lewis’ writings are endlessly fascinating because the man himself was endlessly fascinating—to himself as well as to others. He saw life as a sort of drama and art, one in which the will shapes what Providence has so generously provided. One can readily and happily delve into C.S. Lewis’s autobiography of 1955, Surprised [...]

Puddleglum, Jeremy Bentham, & the Grand Inquisitor

By |2020-11-28T06:58:11-06:00November 28th, 2020|Categories: C.S. Lewis, Dwight Longenecker, Freedom, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Happiness, Philosophy, Politics, Senior Contributors|

The aim and ambition of Jeremy Bentham was that everyone would be happy. But how is it possible for everyone to be happy? The Grand Inquisitor gives the answer: by yielding their freedom and submitting to their overlords. This is the dysfunctional and distorted psychology behind the entitlement culture and the welfare state. When [...]

C.S. Lewis, Langston Hughes, & the Haunting of America

By |2020-11-23T12:44:43-06:00November 22nd, 2020|Categories: American Republic, C.S. Lewis, Literature, Myth, Poetry|

All nations need reminders that even their best ideals, though worth defending, do not earn them chosen nation status. Reading C.S. Lewis’ “That Hideous Strength” and Langston Hughes’ “Let America Be America Again” in light of each other could rouse those in need of both a restoration of confidence in the goodness of the [...]

Living With C.S. Lewis & His Immense Personality

By |2020-11-09T15:59:32-06:00November 9th, 2020|Categories: Bradley J. Birzer, C.S. Lewis, Christian Humanism, Senior Contributors|

C.S. Lewis possessed an immense personality, the kind of personality that affected not only those around him, but also all those who came after him. Full of charisma and brilliance, he both attracted loyal friends and made bitter enemies wherever he went. Strangely enough, I didn’t come to C.S. Lewis as a person or [...]

The True, the Good, and the Ugly in “Till We Have Faces”

By |2020-09-01T11:31:32-05:00September 1st, 2020|Categories: C.S. Lewis, Christian Humanism, Christianity, Christine Norvell, Literature, Love, Myth, Senior Contributors|

In the midst of a dream, Orual’s doubts are finally answered by the gods. Once Psyche gives her the gift of beauty, and the God of the mountain appears and speaks to her, her ugliness is washed away. It takes all of Orual’s life to come to this point of faith and cleansing, and [...]

Going to Heaven With C.S. Lewis

By |2020-08-30T16:15:53-05:00August 30th, 2020|Categories: C.S. Lewis, Christian Humanism, Christianity, Heaven, Joseph Pearce, Senior Contributors|

As with Dante’s glimpse of the beatific vision in the final Canto of the “Divine Comedy,” we are all ultimately rendered speechless in the presence of ineffable Beatitude. We do not have the words to describe the Word. And yet Lewis gives us in the final lines of “The Last Battle” glimpses of glory [...]

Going to Hell and Purgatory With C.S. Lewis

By |2020-08-20T16:32:43-05:00August 23rd, 2020|Categories: C.S. Lewis, Christianity, Heaven, Joseph Pearce, Literature|

C.S. Lewis depicts Hell in "The Great Divorce" as the Grey City, a place where Pride is given enough rope and spends eternity hanging itself. The damned get everything they want by just imagining it, which seems like “heaven,” which is why they don’t desire to leave. In last week’s essay I surveyed the manner [...]

America’s “Logres”: The Mythology of a Nation

By |2020-08-10T16:01:28-05:00August 6th, 2020|Categories: American Republic, C.S. Lewis, Culture, Flannery O'Connor, Imagination, Literature, Myth|

C.S. Lewis believed that every nation possesses what he called a “haunting,” a “Logres,” which baptizes it with a unique inner life. What, or where, is America’s Logres? Who is the mythological hero that could guide the American identity the way Arthur guided Britain and inspired generations of English poets and artists? During my [...]

Abuse of Love: “Till We Have Faces”

By |2020-06-28T01:34:05-05:00June 27th, 2020|Categories: C.S. Lewis, Christian Humanism, Christianity, Fiction, Literature, Love|

In “Till We Have Faces,” the story of Orual and Psyche which Lewis weaves is so powerful because it presents us with the hope that even the greatest cruelty perpetrated by selfish love can be forgiven by true love. Picture the scene, cliché as it is: A young teenager’s parents have just refused her permission [...]

Apostles to the Skeptic: C.S. Lewis and the Catholic Church

By |2020-08-03T17:08:20-05:00June 6th, 2020|Categories: Books, C.S. Lewis, Catholicism, Christian Humanism, Christianity, Joseph Pearce|

Joseph Pearce’s “C.S. Lewis and the Catholic Church” presents a compelling case in suggesting that its subject evolved “into a very Catholic sort of Protestant.” Though C.S. Lewis never became a Roman Catholic, his later works betray a growing affinity for Catholic teaching. C. S. Lewis and the Catholic Church, by Joseph Pearce (220 [...]

Leadership, Hypocrisy, and Dante’s “Inferno”

By |2020-01-03T07:25:25-06:00January 2nd, 2020|Categories: C.S. Lewis, Christian Living, Christianity, Culture, Religion, Virtue|

C.S. Lewis once wrote that “of all the bad men, religious bad men are the worst.” Reflecting on the various revelations in the Church within the past year that involved poor leadership, hypocrisy, and scandalizing behavior to say the least, it is hard not to think of the words of C.S. Lewis and recall [...]

C.S. Lewis and His Critics

By |2019-12-25T22:55:32-06:00December 25th, 2019|Categories: Bradley J. Birzer, C.S. Lewis, Imagination, Literature, Senior Contributors|

Though C.S. Lewis’ reputation among most practicing Christians today is that of a saint, and though he was lauded as such in his own lifetime, the man, not surprisingly, has also accumulated a number of critics, some of them friendly and some of them brutal. In 1944, Charles Brady reported in the pages of [...]

Go to Top