The True, the Good, and the Ugly in “Till We Have Faces”

By |2020-09-01T11:31:32-05:00September 1st, 2020|Categories: C.S. Lewis, Christian Humanism, Christianity, Christine Norvell, Literature, Love, Myth, Senior Contributors|

In the midst of a dream, Orual’s doubts are finally answered by the gods. Once Psyche gives her the gift of beauty, and the God of the mountain appears and speaks to her, her ugliness is washed away. It takes all of Orual’s life to come to this point of faith and cleansing, and [...]

Going to Heaven With C.S. Lewis

By |2020-08-30T16:15:53-05:00August 30th, 2020|Categories: C.S. Lewis, Christian Humanism, Christianity, Heaven, Joseph Pearce, Senior Contributors|

As with Dante’s glimpse of the beatific vision in the final Canto of the “Divine Comedy,” we are all ultimately rendered speechless in the presence of ineffable Beatitude. We do not have the words to describe the Word. And yet Lewis gives us in the final lines of “The Last Battle” glimpses of glory [...]

Going to Hell and Purgatory With C.S. Lewis

By |2020-08-20T16:32:43-05:00August 23rd, 2020|Categories: C.S. Lewis, Christianity, Heaven, Joseph Pearce, Literature|

C.S. Lewis depicts Hell in "The Great Divorce" as the Grey City, a place where Pride is given enough rope and spends eternity hanging itself. The damned get everything they want by just imagining it, which seems like “heaven,” which is why they don’t desire to leave. In last week’s essay I surveyed the manner [...]

America’s “Logres”: The Mythology of a Nation

By |2020-08-10T16:01:28-05:00August 6th, 2020|Categories: American Republic, C.S. Lewis, Culture, Flannery O'Connor, Imagination, Literature, Myth|

C.S. Lewis believed that every nation possesses what he called a “haunting,” a “Logres,” which baptizes it with a unique inner life. What, or where, is America’s Logres? Who is the mythological hero that could guide the American identity the way Arthur guided Britain and inspired generations of English poets and artists? During my [...]

Abuse of Love: “Till We Have Faces”

By |2020-06-28T01:34:05-05:00June 27th, 2020|Categories: C.S. Lewis, Christian Humanism, Christianity, Fiction, Literature, Love|

In “Till We Have Faces,” the story of Orual and Psyche which Lewis weaves is so powerful because it presents us with the hope that even the greatest cruelty perpetrated by selfish love can be forgiven by true love. Picture the scene, cliché as it is: A young teenager’s parents have just refused her permission [...]

Apostles to the Skeptic: C.S. Lewis and the Catholic Church

By |2020-08-03T17:08:20-05:00June 6th, 2020|Categories: Books, C.S. Lewis, Catholicism, Christian Humanism, Christianity, Joseph Pearce|

Joseph Pearce’s “C.S. Lewis and the Catholic Church” presents a compelling case in suggesting that its subject evolved “into a very Catholic sort of Protestant.” Though C.S. Lewis never became a Roman Catholic, his later works betray a growing affinity for Catholic teaching. C. S. Lewis and the Catholic Church, by Joseph Pearce (220 [...]

Leadership, Hypocrisy, and Dante’s “Inferno”

By |2020-01-03T07:25:25-06:00January 2nd, 2020|Categories: C.S. Lewis, Christian Living, Christianity, Culture, Religion, Virtue|

C.S. Lewis once wrote that “of all the bad men, religious bad men are the worst.” Reflecting on the various revelations in the Church within the past year that involved poor leadership, hypocrisy, and scandalizing behavior to say the least, it is hard not to think of the words of C.S. Lewis and recall [...]

C.S. Lewis and His Critics

By |2019-12-25T22:55:32-06:00December 25th, 2019|Categories: Bradley J. Birzer, C.S. Lewis, Imagination, Literature, Senior Contributors|

Though C.S. Lewis’ reputation among most practicing Christians today is that of a saint, and though he was lauded as such in his own lifetime, the man, not surprisingly, has also accumulated a number of critics, some of them friendly and some of them brutal. In 1944, Charles Brady reported in the pages of [...]

C.S. Lewis’ “That Hideous Strength”

By |2019-12-23T10:44:48-06:00December 22nd, 2019|Categories: Books, Bradley J. Birzer, C.S. Lewis, Fiction, Imagination, Literature, Senior Contributors|

Though it would not see publication until August 1945, C.S. Lewis finished his greatest novel, That Hideous Strength, on Christmas Eve, 1943. In terms of depth, style, and audacity, That Hideous Strength is superior to its closest dystopian rivals, Brave New World and 1984. Its characters are far more realistic, and the setting—far from [...]

“Perelandra”: Preventing the Fall

By |2019-11-03T07:22:07-06:00November 2nd, 2019|Categories: Bradley J. Birzer, C.S. Lewis, Fiction, Imagination, Literature, Senior Contributors|

It would be no exaggeration to claim that C.S. Lewis’s “Perelandra”—arguably the least read and least remembered part of his “Space Trilogy”—is nothing short of a masterpiece. In it, the author ably blends science fiction and theology, giving us a gripping thriller, steeped in thought, adventure, and myth. In the second of the three [...]

Curses and Magic in the “Night of the Demon”

By |2019-10-30T17:32:43-05:00October 30th, 2019|Categories: C.S. Lewis, Christian Humanism, Culture, Fiction, Film, Literature|

Like the best horror tales, the “Night of the Demon” came back from the “dead.” This was as a result of a late-night slot for cult movies on British television in the late 1980s. Continuing to this day, the film has attracted ever-increasing praise from critics and found an ever-more appreciative audience. It seems [...]

“Prince Caspian” and Political Extremism

By |2019-11-26T09:44:19-06:00October 15th, 2019|Categories: Books, C.S. Lewis, Conservatism, Literature, Politics, Populism|

Those who object to globalism find themselves in a frustrating, even infuriating position, even now in the age of Brexit and Donald Trump. Three years after the 2016 votes were counted there is still no wall, Britain is still stuck in the EU, and an anonymous White House “adult in the room” has gotten [...]

The Earliest Days of the Inklings

By |2019-09-30T23:36:32-05:00September 30th, 2019|Categories: Bradley J. Birzer, C.S. Lewis, Imagination, Inklings, J.R.R. Tolkien, Literature, Senior Contributors|

J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis talked, dined, drank, and walked together. And then, other friendships began to form around this critical one. Some arrived by chance, some by circumstance, and others by design. Eventually, they adopted a name: “The Inklings.” With the friendship of Tolkien and Lewis having grown into something almost preternaturally solid, [...]

“Out of the Silent Planet”: A Retrospective

By |2019-09-26T22:52:31-05:00September 26th, 2019|Categories: Books, Bradley J. Birzer, C.S. Lewis, Christianity, Imagination, Literature, Senior Contributors|

C.S. Lewis’s “Out of the Silent Planet” presents within the envelope of science fiction a moving story that considers the complexity of human nature and its relationship with the Creator. It would not be an exaggeration to claim that Lewis’s “Space Trilogy” made science fiction respectable, elevating it from what many had perceived as [...]

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