Joseph Mussomeli

About Joseph Mussomeli

Joseph Mussomeli is Senior Contributor at The Imaginative Conservative. He served for almost thirty-five years as an American diplomat, including tours in Egypt, Afghanistan, Morocco, and the Philippines. He was the U.S. ambassador to the Republic of Slovenia and the Kingdom of Cambodia. Before entering the U.S. Foreign Service in 1980, he worked as a Deputy Attorney General in New Jersey.

Twelve Ways to Christmas

By |2019-02-05T11:08:04-05:00December 16th, 2018|Categories: Christianity, Christmas, Culture, Joseph Mussomeli, Religion, Tradition|

Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords our readers the opportunity to join Joseph Mussomeli, as he considers Christmas as a revolution of the heart against the demands of this world for balancing the scales and righting every wrong with a hard justice. —W. Winston Elliott III, Publisher I. When the Outlandish Is the Only [...]

A Christmas That Almost Was

By |2018-12-11T16:15:14-05:00December 11th, 2018|Categories: Christmas, Joseph Mussomeli|

December 1969 (New Jersey) “Christmas,” the old priest snarled, “is an outrage!” He looked about the classroom, hoping to have awakened at least a few students. “Christmas violates the laws of nature and of man.” Some students seemed to be attentive, although it was mid-December and even talking about Christmas was too distracting when they [...]

The Saudi Crown Prince Starring in the Role of Henry II

By |2018-10-25T10:26:36-05:00October 21st, 2018|Categories: Ethics, Joseph Mussomeli, Journalism, Middle East, Monarchy, Politics, Tyranny|

We have all seen the scene at least once, although some of us have savored it perhaps dozens of times. The handsome, dynamic, misunderstood, modernizing young king, with his slender physique, slender beard, and even more slender morals, strutting about the banquet hall knocking the plates and goblets off the table in a drunken frenzy. [...]

The Supreme Court: “Never to the Right, Forever to the Left”

By |2018-11-25T22:10:54-05:00October 15th, 2018|Categories: Conservatism, Joseph Mussomeli, Justice, Liberalism, Politics, Supreme Court|

Despite all the unfounded fear on the left and all the equally unfounded euphoria on the right, there will be no wholesale revamping by the Supreme Court of the liberal social order that is now deeply rooted in our culture and among our people. The conservative justices' ethos of evolution over revolution will forestall any [...]

Everything You Ever Feared to Know About American Security Policy

By |2018-10-08T09:46:31-05:00October 7th, 2018|Categories: Joseph Mussomeli, Liberty, National Security, Senior Contributors, Terrorism|

Two questions should always be asked over and over again before security measures are implemented: At what point do security measures impede security? And at one point is a free people no longer free? It has been quiet recently here in the homeland. Terrorist bombs and other attacks continue unabated in the Middle East and sporadically in Europe, but it has [...]

Syria: Waist Deep in the Big Muddy

By |2018-09-18T11:01:13-05:00September 18th, 2018|Categories: Foreign Affairs, Joseph Mussomeli, Politics, Terrorism, War|

Like his predecessors, President Trump is now convinced that staying the course militarily throughout the Middle East is our only choice, worrying that a “hasty withdrawal would create a vacuum that terrorists would instantly fill." If that is the standard, we will stay forever... Despite this President’s sometimes confused perspective on international relations, his world [...]

Seeking No Monsters: Redefining American Exceptionalism

By |2018-09-21T12:13:13-05:00September 16th, 2018|Categories: Foreign Affairs, Ideology, Joseph Mussomeli, Politics, Timeless Essays|

A foreign policy firmly based on consistency, restraint, and adherence to our founding principles would ultimately achieve what most of us mistakenly believe we already possess: an American Exceptionalism admired and envied by the world... Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords our readers the opportunity to join Joseph Mussomeli as he invites us [...]

A Canticle on a September Morn

By |2018-09-10T13:31:49-05:00September 10th, 2018|Categories: Christianity, History, Joseph Mussomeli, National Security, Politics, Terrorism|

I sometimes still worry that all the publicity centering around 9/11 drowns out the cries of those who died that day. I don’t want that to happen. The tragedy of their dying was corrupted from the very start by our leaders who failed to understand why they died and who used their dying for their [...]

Martin Luther King’s Forgotten Dream

By |2018-08-12T21:55:24-05:00August 12th, 2018|Categories: American Republic, Equality, Social Order|

Are we a nation of ethnic and racial groupings, or are we a nation of individuals, each unique and deserving of equal opportunity unhampered by racial or gender prejudice? For the first two centuries of our nation’s history—indeed, for most of the world’s recorded history—the great Cult of Exclusivity held sway. More commonly known [...]

Five Amusing Myths About the Iran Controversy

By |2018-05-13T23:15:55-05:00May 13th, 2018|Categories: Donald Trump, History, National Security, Politics, Terrorism|

A nuclear-armed Iran is something that the world community should strive to prevent, but in the long run our pushing Iran into a corner will be detrimental to both the United States and Israel… 1. Iran is the Leading State Sponsor of Terrorism The State Department has been regurgitating this mindless drivel for decades [...]

1989: A Tale of Three Cities & the End of the Old New World Order

By |2019-02-07T11:15:07-05:00April 22nd, 2018|Categories: Cold War, Foreign Affairs, History, National Security, Russia, War, Western Civilization|

The year 1989 may well be seen by future historians as one of those rare pivotal years of this past millennium—like 1066, 1492, 1793, and 1914—that profoundly altered the direction of Western Civilization. It is, of course, still too early to say for certain that we as a society set ourselves on a dangerous [...]