Moving Toward Dread Conformity

By |2020-04-09T01:09:32-05:00April 8th, 2020|Categories: Books, Bradley J. Birzer, Civil Society, Civilization, Conservatism, Robert Nisbet, Senior Contributors|

In 1953, Robert Nisbet published “The Quest for Community,” which reveals to us that our own quest has become something both natural and unnatural. That is, it is natural to desire to belong, but it is horrifically unnatural in the ways we choose to commune. 1953 was a banner year for the conservative soul [...]

When the Pandemic Is Over, Will We Be the Same America?

By |2020-04-03T01:06:50-05:00April 3rd, 2020|Categories: Civil Society, Coronavirus, Pat Buchanan, Politics|

The coronavirus crisis seems to be one of those epochal events that alter the character of the country and the course of the republic. You can't go home again. The shattering events of March, followed by what is coming in April and May, will have lasting impacts on the hearts and minds of this generation. [...]

Building American Institutions During a Cultural Crisis

By |2020-03-29T18:36:22-05:00March 29th, 2020|Categories: Books, Civil Society, Conservatism, Culture War, Social Institutions|

In his latest book, Yuval Levin presents irrefutable evidence of America’s weakening attachment to its core institutions of family, community, voluntary associations, religions, and political parties. His goal, however, is to move beyond today’s ideological culture war and show how commitment to institutions puts us on an edifying path to belonging, social status, personal [...]

The Shire and Pestilence: A Fairytale

By |2020-03-27T17:23:35-05:00March 27th, 2020|Categories: Civil Society, Economics, Fiction, Imagination, Joseph Pearce, Senior Contributors|

Once upon a time there was a beautiful land that called itself the Shire. Its people were happy. They lived and worked on their own small pieces of land, growing their own food and trading the surplus with their neighbours. Many of them were also craftsmen, making and fixing things so that everyone could [...]

Must We Kill the Economy to Kill the Virus?

By |2020-03-31T10:40:13-05:00March 24th, 2020|Categories: Civil Society, Coronavirus, Economics, Pat Buchanan|

Reports of folks in this heavily armed nation stocking up on guns and ammunition suggest a widespread apprehension of what may be coming. If the medical crisis is allowed to induce an economic crisis that leads to a social crisis, the American political system, our democratic system, may itself be severely tested. "We cannot let [...]

How Long Can America Hold Together?

By |2020-01-22T16:08:58-06:00January 21st, 2020|Categories: Civil Society, Pat Buchanan|

Americans seem to disagree with each other more and to dislike each other more than they have in the lifetime of most of us. One wonders: How does it all stay together? And for how long? On the holiday set aside in 2020 to honor Martin Luther King, the premier advocate of nonviolent Gandhian civil [...]

A Jeffersonian Model of Citizenship

By |2019-12-18T16:59:48-06:00December 18th, 2019|Categories: American Founding, American Republic, Citizen, Citizenship, Civil Society, Labor/Work, Liberal Learning, Thomas Jefferson|

The assumptions linked to the more deliberative, publicly responsible model of citizenship, though utopian and far-fetched at least within the perspective of modern, western society, can be thought of in a way that makes them seem more practical. Thomas Jefferson, for example, believed both that good government was possible only when those who governed [...]

The Rise of Birth Control & the Decline of Civilization

By |2019-12-06T15:20:32-06:00December 1st, 2019|Categories: Abortion, Civil Society, Civilization, Conservatism, Western Civilization|

Traditionally, the type of men that women wanted to marry embodied all the classic standards of male achievement: educated, physically fit, able to hold down a job. But in 1960, everything changed. A watershed moment produced an oral contraceptive known as “the pill.” No innovation has fundamentally altered the premises of civilization quite like [...]

The Roots of American Polarization

By |2019-11-17T23:39:44-06:00November 17th, 2019|Categories: Civil Society, Morality, Relativism, Truth|

The afflictive thing about living in our polarized society is the terrifying thought that there is something permanent in our incompatibility with each other. No one desires the present unpleasantness. We sincerely wish that we could get along. However, most people want a quick fix. They want magic buttons to push that will make the [...]

Return of the Small Gods?

By |2019-11-16T21:29:54-06:00November 16th, 2019|Categories: Books, Civil Society, Conservatism, Dwight Longenecker, Relativism, Senior Contributors, Western Civilization, Western Tradition|

Rusty Reno’s recent book, Return of the Strong Gods is an excellent explanation of the roots of relativism. The short version is that two world wars left Western civilization with a huge societal case of post-traumatic stress disorder. With heads in hands, the thinkers concluded that we kill one another because of dogma. We say, [...]

What is the Meaning of ‘Modest Fashion Week’?

By |2019-11-03T20:09:41-06:00November 3rd, 2019|Categories: Civil Society, Civilization, Culture, Modernity|

Given the overwhelming rule of liberal fashion, modesty would seem a lost cause. Nonetheless, major fashion designers are returning to what was once considered a modern taboo: clothing that leaves more to the imagination, keeps hemlines down and little skin exposed. When you hear the term “modest fashion,” you think of clothing linked to [...]

Schooling for an Empire

By |2019-10-28T11:38:30-05:00October 28th, 2019|Categories: American Republic, Civil Society, George Stanciu, Senior Contributors, Worldview|

Many Americans refuse to acknowledge that the United States has become an empire; however, virtually, no one doubts that America’s contribution to humankind is material prosperity for all founded on political freedom, technological innovation, and free markets, in effect, an empire of consumer goods and physical comfort. John le Carré, the acclaimed author of [...]

A Return to Normalcy? George Babbitt’s America

By |2019-09-30T23:47:57-05:00September 29th, 2019|Categories: Books, Civil Society, Imagination, Literature, Mark Malvasi, Senior Contributors|

For Sinclair Lewis, ”Babbitt” was a vehicle through which to explore and critique American society during the 1920s. The eponymous hero of the novel finds himself trapped in a conflict between the man he is and the man he wants to be, between the demands of society and the desires of the heart. Lewis sought [...]