Orestes Brownson’s New England and the Unwritten Constitution

By |2019-05-19T15:04:24-05:00May 19th, 2019|Categories: American Republic, Civil Society, Constitution, Culture, History, Political Philosophy, Politics, Timeless Essays|

Orestes Brownson so esteemed New England people, customs, and institutions that they dominated his writings and fit at the heart of his political ideas. Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords our readers the opportunity to join Michael J. Connolly, as he considers the political thought of Orestes Brownson. —W. Winston Elliott, Publisher [...]

Cicero’s Republic: Implanted in the Nature of Man

By |2019-05-17T22:01:44-05:00May 17th, 2019|Categories: Bradley J. Birzer, Cicero, Cicero's Republic Series, Civil Society, Civilization, Senior Contributors|

The best society, Cicero argues, cultivates us as free individuals for the benefit of the community. Virtue exists in every being, but few realize it or cultivate it. Yet, it is what makes men, men, and allows them to be free. Usually remembered for his political triumphs and defeats as well as for his [...]

Timothy Carney’s “Alienated America” & the Future of the American Dream

By |2019-05-16T13:11:57-05:00May 16th, 2019|Categories: Books, Civil Society, Community, Conservatism, Social Institutions|

Timothy Carney’s book "Alienated America" tackles a crucial question that too few policymakers and news commentators even bother asking anymore: What is at the root of America’s contemporary cultural and social malaise? The short answer, according to Mr. Carney, is the deterioration of civil society. Alienated America: Why Some Places Thrive While Other Places Collapse, [...]

The Honorable Roger Scruton and His Enemies

By |2019-05-15T23:14:50-05:00May 15th, 2019|Categories: Books, Civil Society, Conservatism, Roger Scruton, Western Civilization|

I know of no more comprehensive and reflective summary of conservatism than Sir Roger Scruton's "Conservatism: An Invitation to the Great Tradition." We should not expect conservative establishmentarians on either side of the Atlantic to pay it much heed, though, for the author has now been pushed into the ranks of the untouchables. Conservatism: An [...]

The Limits of Liberty

By |2019-05-12T22:25:09-05:00May 12th, 2019|Categories: Bruce Frohnen, Civil Society, Freedom, Government, Liberty, Rule of Law, Senior Contributors, Social Order|

While the rule of law is an essential public good, the actual number and extent of laws also are important factors in determining whether there will be liberty—and, indeed, the rule of law itself. Moreover, as too much law undermines freedom and its own proper character, it also tears apart the very fabric of [...]

Idle Hands, Women’s Wages, and Unmarried Men

By |2019-05-09T19:21:52-05:00May 9th, 2019|Categories: Civil Society, Marriage, Modernity, Progressivism, Social Institutions|

Recently, several statistical studies have shown that a decline in marriage rates may be associated with declining male success and male wages, relative to female wages. Do our men need to learn to deal with this, or will this shift in power between the sexes have significant and serious consequences? In January of 2019, [...]

The Politics of Resentment and Revenge

By |2019-04-27T21:47:07-05:00April 27th, 2019|Categories: Civil Society, Community, Dwight Longenecker, Modernity, Senior Contributors, Social Order|

It seems as if the cycle of Resentment and Revenge is so fundamental to human nature that it cannot be cured by humanistic solutions—but could it be countered by the theological virtues? What’s wrong with the world? Chesterton famously said, “I am, yours sincerely G.K. Chesterton.” However, two thinkers can help us understand the [...]

The Real Digital Divide

By |2019-04-16T14:51:41-05:00April 16th, 2019|Categories: Civil Society, Community, Culture, Family|

There was a time, decades ago when the world was divided between those who were online and offline. Rich people could afford the shiny new gadgets that connected them with everyone. Poor people were left in an analog wasteland on the other side of the digital divide. Social justice warriors of the time demanded [...]

William Warburton’s “Via Media” Between Church and State

By |2019-04-05T13:21:54-05:00April 4th, 2019|Categories: Civil Society, Europe, History, Religion|

William Warburton was a man who, as a theologian living through the debates of the Enlightenment, readapted his role while staying true to its intentions. His was a distinctive voice in these debates because he attacked all sides equally, seeing a paradox between human thought and history. Part of the purpose of intellectual history [...]

A Brief Summary of Traditionalism

By |2019-03-07T16:19:47-05:00March 21st, 2019|Categories: American Republic, Civil Society, Government, Political Philosophy, Rights, Tradition|

The fundamental Traditionalist principle is that truth, which includes morality, is both knowable and unchanging. But is a traditionalist society possible in today’s day and age? The best way, I have found, to sum up my own views of society and politics is to call myself a Traditionalist. I was rather surprised to learn [...]

The Hobbes-Bramhall Debate on Liberty and Necessity

By |2019-02-28T23:53:28-05:00February 28th, 2019|Categories: Civil Society, Government, Leviathan, Monarchy, Political Philosophy, Politics, Western Civilization|

Despite their contrasting metaphysics, Thomas Hobbes and John Bramhall were Royalist supporters during the English Civil War. Both men believed that monarchy was the best form of government despite their opposing perceptions of liberty. If philosophy influences politics, why then would two thinkers’ opposing philosophical views result in support for the same form of [...]

Pillars of Liberty: The Moral Virtues

By |2019-02-22T15:26:25-05:00February 21st, 2019|Categories: Audio/Video, Character, Civil Society, Education, Liberal Learning, Louis Markos, Virtue|

Dr. Louis Markos explains how the problem in today's education is not that virtue is forgotten, but that only certain "pseudo-virtues" are being taught. We're raising a generation of people who say, "Well, yeah, I do sleep around. But I recycle cans and so it's okay." We've thrown out the sins against morality and replaced [...]

The Old-Fashioned Art of Visiting

By |2019-02-17T10:16:46-05:00February 17th, 2019|Categories: Civil Society, Culture, Literature, Mitchell Kalpakgian, Timeless Essays|

Social visits are done for their own sake, for disinterested reasons, for the pleasure of others, and as a gracious act of thoughtfulness that dignifies both the visitor and the visited... Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords our readers the opportunity to join Mitchell Kalpakgian, as he ponders the lost art of "visiting," [...]