Europe

Why Did the Berlin Wall Fall?

By |2019-11-10T22:49:34-06:00November 8th, 2019|Categories: Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Barbara J. Elliott, Communism, Europe, Poland, Russia, Senior Contributors, Timeless Essays|

Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords our readers the opportunity to join Barbara J. Elliott, as she recounts the series of events and the stories of the faithful souls that were necessary to bring down the Berlin Wall and communist tyranny in Eastern Europe. —W. Winston Elliott III, Publisher The Berlin Wall [...]

The Queen’s Speech and the Principle of Subsidiarity

By |2019-11-03T20:05:11-06:00November 3rd, 2019|Categories: Conservatism, England, Europe, Joseph Pearce, Politics, Senior Contributors|

In her recent speech, Queen Elizabeth began by stating that it was always her Government’s priority to secure the United Kingdom’s departure from the European Union. What is particularly exciting about this statement is that it recognizes an ancient wisdom, and most neglected subject: subsidiarity. Any reference to the Queen’s Speech might bring to [...]

Europe’s Great Defender: Viktor Orbán and Christian Democracy

By |2019-10-24T15:01:45-06:00October 27th, 2019|Categories: Christianity, Conservatism, Europe, Foreign Affairs, Immigration, Joseph Pearce, Politics, Senior Contributors, Viktor Orbán|

The rise of populist movements across Europe is seen most potently in the success of the Hungarian Civic Alliance, which, under the tenacious leadership of Viktor Orbán, has been the ruling party in Hungary since 2010. A recent speech by Mr. Orbán, given on September 21 in Rome, will be music to the ears [...]

Brexit and Evensong

By |2019-10-26T21:55:19-06:00October 26th, 2019|Categories: Conservatism, England, Europe, Glenn Arbery, Politics, Senior Contributors, Wyoming Catholic College|

While in London, my wife and I went to evensong at Westminster Abbey. Throughout the trip, evensong somehow gave us the symbol—high, formal, and beautiful—of the end of the day, both of British greatness and the vitality of Europe. After the Vanenburg Conference at Oxford earlier this month, my wife and I went to [...]

Europe Without Europe

By |2019-10-11T12:43:13-06:00October 9th, 2019|Categories: Classical Education, Education, Europe, Glenn Arbery, Senior Contributors, Wyoming Catholic College|

Europe would not be Europe without the current of tradition once inculcated by classical education. It is such an education we must seek to preserve. Though its immediate effects are not manifest, without it the culture would be ceded to those who wish to shape it for a radically secular agenda, perhaps even a posthuman [...]

Brexit or Leave It

By |2019-10-09T06:43:29-06:00October 8th, 2019|Categories: Conservatism, England, Europe, Government, Joseph Pearce, Politics, Senior Contributors|

What does the European Union have in common with Hotel California? The answer is that you can check out any time you like, but you can never leave. Take, for instance, the ongoing Brexit saga. Over and again, in one democratic vote after another, the British people have made it abundantly clear that they [...]

Traditional Education & the Future of Europe

By |2019-10-02T15:25:41-06:00October 2nd, 2019|Categories: Classical Education, Conservatism, Europe, Glenn Arbery, Liberal Arts, Senior Contributors, Western Tradition, Wyoming Catholic College|

Near the end of his recent book, Conservatism: An Invitation to the Great Tradition (highly recommended), the English philosopher Roger Scruton makes a very interesting observation about what is possible in America but not in Europe. As he puts it, the burden of American conservatism has been to define the customs and traditions most [...]

George Kennan’s Diaries

By |2019-09-04T23:49:16-06:00September 4th, 2019|Categories: American Republic, Books, Civilization, Cold War, Europe, Foreign Affairs, Politics, War|

George Kennan was—and remains—an important, even compelling, figure in the early history of the Cold War. But these selections from his voluminous and often overwrought diaries reveal him to have been something other than what this honest, if not always moderate, this calm, but not always cool, and detached professional diplomat took himself to [...]

Faith, Family, and the Future of Europe

By |2019-05-12T00:09:57-06:00May 11th, 2019|Categories: Europe, Faith, Family, Joseph Pearce, Senior Contributors, Western Civilization|

Europe has a suicidal tendency to ignore the problem underlying its decay: a lack of faith and families. But perhaps, in light of recent legislation in Poland and Hungary rooted in faith and family and the future, perhaps we may be seeing the sun rising in Europe’s East, even as we see it setting [...]

Slipping Inside Fauré’s Nocturne No. 4

By |2019-05-12T00:06:31-06:00May 11th, 2019|Categories: Beauty, Culture, Europe, Music|

Falling in love with French composer Gabriel Fauré’s Nocturne No. 4 wasn’t one of those thunderclap experiences. It crept up on me, gradually. I’d been listening to this Fauré Nocturne CD for almost a decade, mostly as I drove, and enjoying the music’s understated elegance and beauty. Then, this past year, something clicked with [...]

Seeking the Humane: Big Big Train’s “Grand Tour”

By |2019-05-09T22:58:30-06:00May 9th, 2019|Categories: Bradley J. Birzer, Culture, Europe, Music, Senior Contributors|

On its new album, Grand Tour, Big Big Train considers everything from the NASA ship Voyager's leaving the solar system, to the nineteenth-century romantic interpretation of The Tempest, to the meaning of one of the greatest saints of late antiquity, St. Theodora. The album really is about human exploration of self and of world. There [...]

Unearthed History: The War of The Vendée

By |2019-04-23T23:44:18-06:00April 23rd, 2019|Categories: Catholicism, Europe, History, Revolution|

The series of battles that took place in the Vendée have been almost entirely excluded from any recounting of the Revolution. Why? The rising in the Vendée paints a darker picture of the evils that Revolutionists did to those citizens, most of them peasants, who would not adopt the principles of the Revolution. Something about the [...]

William Warburton’s “Via Media” Between Church and State

By |2019-09-24T13:07:10-06:00April 4th, 2019|Categories: Civil Society, Europe, History, Religion|

William Warburton was a man who, as a theologian living through the debates of the Enlightenment, readapted his role while staying true to its intentions. His was a distinctive voice in these debates because he attacked all sides equally, seeing a paradox between human thought and history. Part of the purpose of intellectual history [...]