Demonizing Russia: Fake News Goes Viral

By |2020-04-14T15:42:26-05:00April 14th, 2020|Categories: Conservatism, Europe, Foreign Affairs, Government, Joseph Pearce, Politics, Russia, Senior Contributors|

A journal is claiming that the Russian government was using the Covid-19 outbreak to strengthen anti-EU feelings, make propaganda gains, and gather intelligence at the heart of NATO. Although this report has gained traction, what is this statement really saying and who is saying it? According to a recent news report, Russia is using [...]

Poland, Russia, Globalism, and the Legacy of World War II

By |2020-03-01T18:50:12-06:00March 1st, 2020|Categories: Communism, Conservatism, Joseph Pearce, Poland, Politics, Russia, Senior Contributors, World War II|

Though they should be on the same side in their opposition to globalism, Russia and Poland have recently entered into an unholy spat over the history of World War II. The Russian Ambassador to Poland stated recently in an interview with the Russian news site rbc.ru that relations between Russia and Poland are “the [...]

Saving Christian Civilization Through Eros

By |2020-05-20T23:25:29-05:00January 26th, 2020|Categories: Culture, Music, Peter Strzelecki Rieth, Poland, Russia|

What I behold today is a Western world of “tolerance” and homosexual-inspired androgyny, so morally bankrupt and decadent that even the natural, primitive sexual appetites that make women attractive for men have been erased. It has come to this: Conservatives must now begin the restoration of civilization by promoting erotic love in order to [...]

A Reflection on the Resurrection of the Superfluous Man

By |2019-12-07T03:11:19-06:00December 6th, 2019|Categories: Character, Fiction, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Imagination, Literature, Russia|

Russia’s nineteenth-century literary luminaries all found themselves wrestling with a particularly Romantic archetype: the Superfluous Man. Bored, confused, dissolute, yet noble and aristocratic, the Superfluous Man experiences tragedy in his reckless pursuit of passion. And I can’t help but wonder whether there is any hope for these characters—both the Russians in the novels, and [...]

Why Did the Berlin Wall Fall?

By |2019-12-04T09:56:35-06:00November 8th, 2019|Categories: Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Barbara J. Elliott, Communism, Europe, Poland, Russia, Senior Contributors, Timeless Essays|

Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords our readers the opportunity to join Barbara J. Elliott, as she recounts the series of events and the stories of the faithful souls that were necessary to bring down the Berlin Wall and communist tyranny in Eastern Europe. —W. Winston Elliott III, Publisher The Berlin Wall [...]

The Ambiguity of Stalin

By |2019-04-25T23:43:12-05:00April 25th, 2019|Categories: Books, Communism, History, Russia|

Somehow Joseph Stalin cannot be reduced merely to just another Russian autocrat or just another communist dictator. Not for him the “banality of evil.”… Stalin: Paradoxes of Power, 1878–1928 By Stephen Kotkin (Penguin Press, 2014) Stalin: New Biography of a Dictator By Oleg Khlevniuk, translated by Nora Seligman Favorov (Yale University Press, 2015) The [...]

“Stalker”: The Search for Faith Amidst Desolation

By |2019-09-28T09:49:41-05:00February 28th, 2019|Categories: Christianity, Culture, Film, Russia, St. John Paul II, StAR|

Andrei Tarkovsky’s film Stalker is about a man who leads others, however obliquely, and despite obstacles, both external and internal, to faith. Faith is faith. Without it, man is deprived of any spiritual roots. He is like a blind man. Just more than thirty years ago, on 26 April 1986, a nuclear disaster occurred at the Chernobyl Nuclear [...]

The Dangers of Russophobia

By |2019-02-27T13:37:45-06:00February 24th, 2019|Categories: Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Character, Communism, Government, Joseph Pearce, Political Philosophy, Politics, Russia, Senior Contributors|

We should not confuse or conflate Russian President Vladimir Putin with Soviet leaders, such as Josef Stalin. They are as different as the proverbial chalk and cheese. Nowhere is this more evident than the way in which Mr. Putin has shown himself to be a great admirer of the anti-Soviet dissident, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn. The Special [...]

Putin and Solzhenitsyn

By |2020-07-26T01:09:56-05:00August 20th, 2018|Categories: Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Books, Film, History, Joseph Pearce, Politics, Russia|

In Vladimir Putin’s Russia, the greatest classic of anti-communist literature, Alexander Solzhenitsyn's "The Gulag Archipelago," is now compulsory reading in all high schools. We don’t need to like Vladimir Putin. We don’t need to admire him. But we do need to acknowledge that Russia has moved on from the evils of socialism, even as we [...]

Russia: Is it Time to Give Peace a Chance?

By |2019-05-09T12:12:54-05:00July 22nd, 2018|Categories: Catholicism, Christianity, Donald Trump, Foreign Affairs, History, Joseph Pearce, Politics, Russia|

Russia is resurrected from the dead, rising from the tomb in which communism had placed it. It is emerging as a Christian country at a time when other erstwhile Christian countries seem intent on abandoning their faith in order to embrace the suicidal culture of death... Patrick Buchanan’s succinct and penetrating essay on President Trump’s [...]

Did President Trump Commit Treason With Vladimir Putin?

By |2019-04-25T15:26:49-05:00July 17th, 2018|Categories: American Republic, Donald Trump, Foreign Affairs, Pat Buchanan, Politics, Russia|

Beginning his joint press conference with Vladimir Putin, President Donald Trump declared that U.S. relations with Russia have “never been worse.” He then added pointedly, that just changed “about four hours ago.” It certainly did. With his remarks in Helsinki and at the NATO summit in Brussels, President Trump has signaled a historic shift [...]

1989: A Tale of Three Cities & the End of the Old New World Order

By |2019-05-30T10:30:15-05:00April 22nd, 2018|Categories: Cold War, Foreign Affairs, History, National Security, Russia, War, Western Civilization|

The year 1989 may well be seen by future historians as one of those rare pivotal years of this past millennium—like 1066, 1492, 1793, and 1914—that profoundly altered the direction of Western Civilization. It is, of course, still too early to say for certain that we as a society set ourselves on a dangerous [...]

Misremembering the Russian Revolution: Romanticism Not Reality

By |2017-10-05T13:21:02-05:00October 4th, 2017|Categories: Culture, Europe, History, Joseph Pearce, Myth, Russia, Tragedy, War|

The tragedy is not that the Russian Revolution is being forgotten; it’s that it is being remembered in the wrong way. It is being seen through rose-coloured spectacles, its grim reality being smothered in layers of romantic myth… This month is the centenary of the Bolshevik Revolution, one of the most important moments in [...]

Russia and the Rebirth of History

By |2017-10-07T17:16:55-05:00July 26th, 2017|Categories: Conservatism, Featured, Glenn Davis, History, Russia, Senior Contributors|

There is no escape from historical existence. With all its contingencies, unexpected happenings, and mysteries, historical existence offers opportunities for grasping the great drama of life… Conservative intellectuals have long been suspicious of the pressures that political ideologies place on the writing of history. Most famously, Herbert Butterfield, in his classic work, The Whig [...]

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