Love

The Death of Eros & the Tragedy of Love in “Antony and Cleopatra”

By |2019-10-11T12:59:16-05:00October 10th, 2019|Categories: Imagination, Literature, Love, Paul Krause, Politics, Senior Contributors, William Shakespeare|

Antony and Cleopatra is one of the most mature of William Shakespeare’s tragedies. As such, it is arguably one of his finest and deepest works. Pride, love, and the Fall all factor into the play as much as does the contest between temporal politics and eternal love. Antony and Cleopatra are passionate and energetic [...]

Dante on Lust

By |2019-09-09T22:56:39-05:00September 9th, 2019|Categories: Christianity, Dante, Great Books, Letters From Dante Series, Louis Markos, Love, Morality, Sexuality, Virtue|

It is both seemly and right to feel love and even erotic passion, but when such feelings are taken to an improper extreme or directed toward an improper object, they grow twisted and perverse and morph into the sin of lust. We will have done significant damage to ourselves. Author’s Introduction: Imagine if Homer, [...]

Homer’s “Iliad” and the Shield of Love and Strife

By |2019-08-08T09:43:26-05:00August 8th, 2019|Categories: Great Books, Greek Epic Poetry, Homer, Iliad, Literature, Love, Odyssey, Paul Krause, Senior Contributors, War|

The human characters of Homer’s grand epic, the “Iliad,” embody what Homer is driving home at with his poem: the tension between strife and love. Achilles transforms from a rage-filled and strife-filled killer to a forgiving lover touched by the very power of love. Homer’s Iliad is the defining epic of Western literature. Its [...]

Solomon on Sex

By |2019-08-01T14:57:46-05:00July 30th, 2019|Categories: Christianity, Culture, Letters From Dante Series, Louis Markos, Love, Marriage, Senior Contributors, Sexuality|

Love is as strong as death and unyielding as the grave. It is not something to be indulged in lightly or casually. The lover and beloved move out of themselves toward the other, making themselves as vulnerable as children. They give all that is in their heart, for they trust that the other will [...]

Chaucer & the Heresy of Courtly Love

By |2019-07-28T21:18:35-05:00July 28th, 2019|Categories: Geoffrey Chaucer, Great Books, Literature, Love, Mitchell Kalpakgian, Senior Contributors, Timeless Essays|

With consummate sophistication, courtly love idealizes the vice of lust as a beautiful sentiment and spiritual longing that only the so-called holy gift of “love” can satisfy. Chaucer’s satire on innovative theories of marriage and the heresy of courtly love validates the wisdom of the Church’s teaching on hierarchy, fidelity, and indissolubility. Today’s offering [...]

Plato’s “Symposium”: The Drama and Trial of Eros

By |2019-07-21T22:20:01-05:00July 21st, 2019|Categories: Great Books, Love, Myth, Paul Krause, Philosophy, Plato|

Plato was a moralist. An ethicist. He was concerned with the primacy of action, of engagement, in a world that was deeply iconoclastic, barbarous, and savage. Love of wisdom allows for the creation of that space where ethical and loving life is possible. Plato’s Symposium is one of the most iconic works of literature [...]

For the Love of Peter

By |2019-06-22T22:08:35-05:00June 22nd, 2019|Categories: Culture, Love, Modernity, Wisdom|

Love is for persons, not for qualities or ideas, except only derivatively, that is, insofar as the latter exist in the former. To insist that love is love for this person is not an appeal to settle for someone with less than stellar qualifications—for “settling” is itself the attitude of the consumer who prudently resigns [...]

Chasing Lions: Don Quixote in Pursuit of the Beautiful

By |2019-06-11T14:21:58-05:00June 9th, 2019|Categories: Beauty, Culture, Great Books, Imagination, Love, Timeless Essays, Truth|

When man pursues beauty, he takes it into himself and becomes beautiful through it; a perpetual beauty-seeker, such as Don Quixote, is, therefore, a beautiful man. Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords our readers the opportunity to join Jacob Terneus, as he reflects upon the character of Don Quixote. —W. Winston Elliott [...]

In the Ruins of Babylon: The Poetic “Genius” of John Keats

By |2019-05-29T23:11:39-05:00May 29th, 2019|Categories: Christianity, Culture, Love, Paul Krause, Poetry, Religion, Senior Contributors|

The poetry of John Keats is a window into the mad genius of the Romantics: their lusts and hopes; their ambitions and ignorance; their radicalism and fantasies. In reading Keats, one is simultaneously scandalized and sympathetic to the longing of the Romantic heart. “The best things we have come from madness.” John Keats died [...]

From Diotima to Christ: Augustine’s Visionary Ascents in the “Confessions”

By |2019-03-15T20:42:53-05:00March 9th, 2019|Categories: Books, Christianity, Literature, Love, Paul Krause, Senior Contributors, St. Augustine, Truth, Wisdom|

Augustine’s Confessions is the odyssey of the soul. It is the odyssey of the human heart, as Augustine shifts from the emphasis of intellect to the primacy of love. He shows that it is not by having a strong mind that one is capable of ascent and touching; rather, it is by having a strong [...]