Abuse of Love: “Till We Have Faces”

By |2020-06-28T01:34:05-05:00June 27th, 2020|Categories: C.S. Lewis, Christian Humanism, Christianity, Fiction, Literature, Love|

In “Till We Have Faces,” the story of Orual and Psyche which Lewis weaves is so powerful because it presents us with the hope that even the greatest cruelty perpetrated by selfish love can be forgiven by true love. Picture the scene, cliché as it is: A young teenager’s parents have just refused her permission [...]

Magnanimity: The Balm for Our Brutalized Public Discourse

By |2020-05-15T15:28:23-05:00May 15th, 2020|Categories: Civil Society, Love, Stephen M. Klugewicz|

Every man is his own pope and philosopher-king on the Internet, where our semi-formed and semi-informed opinions are cast as absolutes. Convinced of our perfect knowledge and infallible righteousness, we denounce and demean in harsh, uncharitable terms the arguments of others, and even their very persons. “Minds are conquered not by arms, but by love [...]

Wine, Poetry, and Community-Building

By |2020-04-28T16:43:45-05:00April 28th, 2020|Categories: Community, Culture, Love, Poetry|

Reading poems about home and community is well and good, but this does not itself build community. Drinking a few glasses of wine and reciting a poem in good company, however, can. Community is simply home more broadly understood. And, although home is not always a location, its psychological contours can be, and indeed [...]

Antony and Eros: A Suicide Pact

By |2020-04-21T09:45:10-05:00April 22nd, 2020|Categories: Imagination, Joseph Pearce, Literature, Love, Modernity, Morality, Senior Contributors, Virtue, William Shakespeare|

There are none so blind as those who can only see themselves. This is the tragedy of narcissism or what the psychologist Paul Vitz has called selfism. The modern narcissist no longer looks at himself in a pool of water, or even in the mirror; he sees himself in countless selfies, the icons of [...]

The Sublime Beauty of Salvation

By |2020-04-09T12:04:16-05:00April 9th, 2020|Categories: Beauty, Christianity, Culture, Easter, Love, Paul Krause, Religion, Senior Contributors|

The victory of Christ on the Cross was not a victory of sunshine, happy thoughts, and rainbows. Nay, it was a victory of sublime splendor. It was horrifying. It was total. It was—and remains—through the eyes of faith, also beautiful. St. Paul says that he is determined to know, and preach, nothing but “Christ [...]

Debussy’s “Girl With the Flaxen Hair”

By |2020-02-17T13:28:37-06:00February 13th, 2020|Categories: Audio/Video, Culture, Love, Music|

Claude Debussy’s “The Girl with the Flaxen Hair” ranks right up there alongside his “Clair de Lune,” “Beau Soir,” and “Afternoon of a Faun” on my “favorite short classical pieces” list. In spite of their brevity, all of them immediately transport you, taking you to a vivid, sensual, evocative place that, once you’ve returned to [...]

Metamorphosis by Love

By |2020-02-13T19:41:21-06:00February 13th, 2020|Categories: Great Books, Imagination, Literature, Love, Myth, Paul Krause, Senior Contributors|

Ovid’s “Metamorphoses” is many things: several stories, some bleak, some uplifting, ranging from the creation of the world to the apotheosis of Julius Caesar. Yet in its most fundamental form, his epic love poem of many stories reveals deep truths in its poetic proclamations of the transformative power, and spirit, of love. Ovid was [...]

Shakespeare on Love and War

By |2020-02-05T13:52:16-06:00February 5th, 2020|Categories: Great Books, History, Imagination, Literature, Love, Paul Krause, Senior Contributors, William Shakespeare|

What hath Shakespeare to do with the politics of regime change? Given the long and unsuccessful history of what we call regime change, from the installment of the Shah over Persia, to the Bay of Pigs, to Libya, one questions the sanity of anyone who routinely calls for “regime change.” Yet long before our [...]

Who Was T.S. Eliot’s True Love?

By |2020-01-25T20:12:57-06:00January 25th, 2020|Categories: Character, History, Imagination, Joseph Pearce, Literature, Love, Senior Contributors, T.S. Eliot|

T.S. Eliot’s correspondence with Emily Hale was recently opened, having been kept in Princeton archives until fifty years after Miss Hale’s death. Also opened was Eliot’s response to the archives. It seemed that the poet’s ghost had returned for one last lover’s quarrel with the ghost of his first love, over a century after [...]

The Drama of Love in Richard Wagner’s “Ring of the Nibelungen”

By |2020-01-23T22:40:05-06:00January 23rd, 2020|Categories: Love, Marriage, Music, Paul Krause, Richard Wagner|

Richard Wagner’s grand operatic drama The Ring of the Nibelung is rightly celebrated as one of the finest accomplishments of modern art. The story that Wagner tells, with the unfolding music meant to convey a primordial sense of enchantment forever lost to us, is about the tension between love and lust; the sacred and [...]