Are the Minneapolis and Atlanta Police Officers Guilty?

By |2020-07-20T10:40:21-05:00July 19th, 2020|Categories: Constitution, Justice, Senior Contributors, Thomas R. Ascik|

In the cases of Officers Derek Chauvin and Garrett Rolfe, politicians, the media, and Black Lives Matter would not allow any charge that did not include the word “murder.” If the two were not police officers, no prosecutor would have charged them with anything but manslaughter. Have they thus been denied the equal protection of [...]

Is Defunding the Police the Answer?

By |2020-06-22T10:04:04-05:00June 21st, 2020|Categories: American Republic, Community, John Horvat, Justice, Order, Politics|

America needs moral restoration. Without it, society just goes from bad to worse, chasing doomed utopian ideas like defunding the police, and redirecting funds to leftist groups that hate and subvert the traditional family. Trying to solve the problem of policing without moral regeneration and the rebuilding of our families, communities, and Church is [...]

Athena as Founder & Statesman

By |2019-12-27T17:59:57-06:00December 27th, 2019|Categories: Justice, Literature, Myth, Politics, Religion, Statesman, Timeless Essays|

In the “Oresteia,” Aeschylus examines whether a city exists for proper worship of gods or whether it exists for proper cultivation of “that which is most divine in us.” Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords our readers the opportunity to join John Alvis, as he considers Aeschylus’ views of the polity as embodied [...]

Juries, Judges, and Justice Thomas on Defamation

By |2019-09-15T22:17:38-05:00September 15th, 2019|Categories: American Republic, Justice, Senior Contributors, Thomas R. Ascik|

This summer saw the resolutions of two high-profile civil lawsuits involving accusations of defamation and libel against two pillars of the media-academic complex. In the suit against hyper-liberal Oberlin College, Ohio state jurors rendered a judgment against their neighbor, the college. In the other case, a lawsuit against The Washington Post, the federal district-court [...]

Isaiah on Hope

By |2019-08-20T22:41:46-05:00August 20th, 2019|Categories: Christianity, Hope, Israel, Justice, Letters From Dante Series, Louis Markos, Senior Contributors, Truth|

Hope is not only conveyed through the images; hope rests in them. The promised visions shape a future that God will eventually make real: or, better, that he will make concrete in human time and space, for they were already real when God revealed them to me. Author’s Introduction: Imagine if Homer, Virgil, Dante, [...]

Pardoning the Unpardonable

By |2020-08-03T18:04:50-05:00June 20th, 2019|Categories: American Republic, Donald Trump, Joseph Mussomeli, Justice, Politics, Senior Contributors, War|

Before legal codes were hammered into stone tablets, there were customs that enshrined a code of conduct for all warriors. And this code has always been founded on an unfathomable paradox: that those we kill we must also honor. It’s a familiar story. A soldier’s rage. In fairness, we might even call it righteous [...]

Death and Deception: “Longford” and “Dead Man Walking”

By |2019-12-10T15:49:19-06:00May 10th, 2019|Categories: Audio/Video, Culture, Death, Dwight Longenecker, Evil, Film, Justice|

While the films “Longford” and “Dead Man Walking” are ostensibly about the death penalty, the real value of both films is their profound exploration of the depth of human evil. On June 7, 1998 a Texan, John William King, along with friends Shawn Berry and Lawrence Brewer, killed African American James Byrd. They beat [...]

Aeschylus on Justice

By |2019-10-24T11:31:12-05:00February 26th, 2019|Categories: Imagination, Justice, Letters From Dante Series|

Justice is that which breaks us out of the cycle of vengeance. It achieves a higher vision that considers motives (and not just actions), causes (and not just effects), purposes (and not just naked facts). The triumph of justice does not signify the total defeat of vengeance, but its transformation into something beneficent. Author’s Introduction: [...]

Death to the Death Penalty? René Girard’s Challenge to Thomas Aquinas

By |2018-11-23T23:38:59-06:00November 19th, 2018|Categories: Catholicism, Christianity, Death, Justice, St. Thomas Aquinas|

Is acceptance of the death penalty contrary to the modern understanding of the dignity of the human person? The anthropology of René Girard allows for a rereading of Thomas Aquinas’ defense of capital punishment... The Catholic Church’s recent definitive revocation of the death penalty[1] suggests that something in the zeitgeist demands a rethinking of one [...]

The Supreme Court: “Never to the Right, Forever to the Left”

By |2018-11-25T22:10:54-06:00October 15th, 2018|Categories: Conservatism, Joseph Mussomeli, Justice, Liberalism, Politics, Supreme Court|

Despite all the unfounded fear on the left and all the equally unfounded euphoria on the right, there will be no wholesale revamping by the Supreme Court of the liberal social order that is now deeply rooted in our culture and among our people. The conservative justices' ethos of evolution over revolution will forestall any [...]

Brett Kavanaugh and Originalism

By |2018-10-09T15:53:15-05:00October 9th, 2018|Categories: Congress, Justice, Political Philosophy, Politics, Supreme Court|

Even before the spectacle of Christine Balsey Ford's testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee, the hearing for President Trump’s nominee to the U.S. Supreme Court, Brett Kavanaugh, was characterized not by political acumen, wit, cunning, or prudence, but by partisan obstruction, lawlessness, tantrums, hysteria, ignorance, frenzy, and anger. Protestors screamed vulgarities and trite slogans, proving [...]

Was Aristotle the Father of Radical Individualism?

By |2019-04-04T13:06:37-05:00June 18th, 2018|Categories: Aristotle, Great Books, Justice, Philosophy, Plato, Socrates, Virtue|

A recent essay proposes Aristotle to have “opened a path” to today’s radical individualism and relativism. In order to evaluate this thesis, we must turn to the Great Tradition of the “perennial philosophy” and ask what the great philosophers taught about virtue, justice, friendship, and the nature of man… There is a story about [...]

Go to Top