Why the Right Still Needs Russell Kirk

By |2018-10-31T21:06:09-05:00October 31st, 2018|

When I bought The Conservative Mind in 1994, I thought it was probably a book about how bad President Bill Clinton and the Democrats were—because that’s what I thought conservatism was. I was nineteen, a high school graduate with no intention of attending university, and thought “conservative” simply meant whatever Rush Limbaugh had talked about that day. [...]

The Closing of the Western Mind

By |2018-01-20T00:36:35-05:00January 19th, 2018|

Allan Bloom’s diagnosis in The Closing of the American Mind can explain far more about the sorry state of American higher education and the Western condition than popular stories that blame the Enlightenment, or democracy, or medieval nominalism. And it is therefore a valuable starting point… Last year marked the thirtieth anniversary of Allan [...]

Is a “Liberal Conservative” an Oxymoron?

By |2018-06-21T20:35:16-05:00November 1st, 2017|

The liberal conservative must be discerning. For he believes in freedom as well as in order. He believes in individualism as well as in community. He believes in the equality of all men as well as in hierarchy, natural aristocracy, and excellence… Stephen Tonsor (left) and Russell Kirk in 1977 After the [...]

The Conservatism of John Quincy Adams

By |2017-10-14T22:44:33-05:00October 15th, 2017|

A scrutiny of John Quincy Adams’ words and deeds across his broad public life shows him to be a successful conservative, both as a thinker and as a leader… Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords readers the opportunity to join Sean Mattie as he explores the conservatism of John Quincy Adams through [...]

“The Conservative Mind”: A Chaotic Story of Decay?

By |2018-05-29T16:09:20-05:00October 11th, 2017|

In The Conservative Mind, Russell Kirk sought to identify, elucidate, and cultivate the best of the Western tradition as the West itself weathered, rather roughly at times, the storms of ideologies. Conserve the past, yes, but Kirk also wanted us to rally to the standards of the past to leave an inheritance for our children… [...]

My First Reading of “The Conservative Mind”

By |2017-12-16T19:22:56-05:00September 25th, 2017|

When I finished The Conservative Mind for the first time, I remember thinking quite clearly that Russell Kirk had gotten so close to truth, but, then, just when he had the chance, he failed to promote freedom—the proper answer to every single thing… Russell Kirk I often look at, hold, and peruse my [...]

In Honor of Russell Kirk

By |2019-04-07T10:50:19-05:00June 11th, 2017|

What Russell Kirk did was to demonstrate that intelligent conservatism was not a mere smokescreen for selfishness. It was an attitude toward life with substance and moral force of its own… Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords readers the opportunity to join George Nash as he examines the life of Russell Kirk, [...]

Russell Kirk on the Variety and Mystery of Human Existence

By |2017-05-12T09:10:37-05:00May 10th, 2017|Tags: |

Too often the public conversation about universal truths divides along rather sterile ideological lines. Russell Kirk’s great warning is that this is not really a battle of ideas, understood abstractly, but a battle of sentiments or affections… Since the nation’s founding, a salutary tension has informed American political thought—a tension between the abstract, universal [...]

Russell Kirk the Conservative, Russell Kirk the Man

By |2017-12-06T16:50:09-05:00April 28th, 2017|

Russell Kirk’s life and labors can offer a potential salve to the recent struggles of American conservatism, which is threatened by a pall of superficiality and cynicism… Russell Kirk: American Conservative by Bradley Birzer (University Press of Kentucky, 2015) In the two decades since the death of Russell Amos Augustine Kirk, American conservatism has struggled. [...]

Ten Books That Shaped America’s Conservative Renaissance

By |2018-11-27T14:21:30-05:00March 12th, 2017|

Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords readers the opportunity to join Jeffrey O. Nelson as he explores the books and thinkers who shaped America’s Conservative Renaissance. —W. Winston Elliott III, Publisher If a conservative order is indeed to return, we ought to know the tradition which is attached to it, so that we [...]

Religion and the Conservative Mind

By |2017-01-20T23:04:20-05:00December 18th, 2016|

Forgetting flawed human nature, the reason-worshipper becomes a sort of fundamentalist of the mind, convinced that intellect alone holds the key to wisdom… Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords readers the opportunity to join Dermot Quinn as he examines the role of religion in Russell Kirk’s The Conservative Mind. —W. Winston Elliott III, Publisher [...]

“The Conservative Mind”: An Act of Recovery?

By |2016-10-30T08:07:23-05:00July 10th, 2016|

Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords readers the opportunity to join Ted McAllister as he examines Russell Kirk’s The Conservative Mind. Dr. Kirk reminds us that not only ought we to be fighting over ideas but we ought to be shaping hearts. —W. Winston Elliott III, Publisher Since the nation’s founding, a salutary tension has informed American [...]

Still Questing for Community

By |2016-04-30T12:24:51-05:00April 11th, 2016|

Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords readers the opportunity to join Robert Nisbet as he reflects on his landmark book, The Quest for Community. —W. Winston Elliott III, Publisher In the retrospect of forty years I can see my book, The Quest for Community (first published by Oxford University Press in 1953), as one of [...]

The Voice of This Calling: The Enduring Legacy of T.S. Eliot

By |2016-02-28T23:44:50-05:00February 28th, 2016|

Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords readers the opportunity to join Clint Brand as he considers the legacy of T.S. Eliot.  —W. Winston Elliott III, Publisher In 1953, the first edition of The Conservative Mind was subtitled From Burke to Santayana; the second and every edition thereafter bore the subtitle From Burke to Eliot. [...]