Liberal Education: The Foundation and Preservation of a Free Society

By |2019-02-28T15:50:32-05:00February 27th, 2019|Categories: Classical Education, Freedom, Liberal Arts, Liberal Learning, Liberty, Tradition, Western Tradition, Wisdom|

In a time of economic uncertainty, liberal education holds out the promise of joy in learning, contentment in contemplating truth, and satisfaction in community. These things are available to all people, rich or poor. Liberal education and the free society have always been intimately connected. A liberal education, an education which prepares one for [...]

On Loving Definitions

By |2019-02-18T22:11:33-05:00February 18th, 2019|Categories: Books, Bradley J. Birzer, Education, Senior Contributors, Tradition, Western Tradition|

I first came across Russell Kirk’s belief that academics must serve as guardians of “the Word” in his groundbreaking but now sadly-neglected book, Academic Freedom: An Essay in Definition (1955). “The principle support to academic freedom, in the classical world, the medieval world, and the American educational tradition, has been the conviction, among scholars and [...]

Is Specialization Killing Culture?

By |2019-01-25T22:14:19-05:00January 25th, 2019|Categories: Beauty, Civilization, Community, Culture, Michael De Sapio, Modernity, Permanent Things, Senior Contributors, The Imaginative Conservative, Truth, Western Civilization, Western Tradition|

If culture is simply a matter of private enthusiasms and hobbies, of small details and specialties, then what of a common culture? What about the collective project and shared sense of purpose that built Western civilization? “The expert takes a little subject for his province, and remains a provincial for the rest of his [...]

Banning Books and Burning Heretics

By |2019-01-24T22:31:46-05:00January 24th, 2019|Categories: Civil Society, Culture, Culture War, England, Ethics, Free Speech, Joseph Pearce, Literature, Modernity, Poetry, Rights, Senior Contributors, Western Civilization, Western Tradition|

Advocates of the liberal arts include “heretical” books in the great conversation, whereas political liberals seek to silence them as dangerous. As we have seen in Nazi Germany and in communist countries, the banning of “heretical” books ends with the burning of “heretics”… Several years ago, I visited the two-room shack in Tupelo, Mississippi, [...]

The Classics and Christianity

By |2019-01-11T15:44:57-05:00January 11th, 2019|Categories: C.S. Lewis, Christianity, Civilization, Classical Education, Classics, Culture, Great Books, Homer, Liberal Learning, Literature, Myth, Paul Krause, Senior Contributors, St. Augustine, Virgil, Western Civilization, Western Tradition, Worldview|

Christians invented the classical curriculum; it is as much part of the broader Western inheritance as it is specifically part of the Christian inheritance… Why study old books? How do dusty old books written by dead men and women thousands of years ago grow my faith? Such can be common thoughts when the Christian [...]

Liberty and Liberal Education

By |2018-12-26T15:36:02-05:00December 25th, 2018|Categories: American Republic, Civil Society, Classical Education, Education, Great Books, Liberal Arts, Liberal Learning, Western Tradition, Wyoming Catholic College|

Free citizens are necessarily invited to follow the Delphic injunction, “know thyself,” that is addressed to all mankind; and their success or failure in responding to this invitation is crucial for the preservation or loss of their liberty… Liberal education is the distinctive educational tradition of the West; so, too, is liberty our distinctive political tradition. [...]

To Be Unfit for the Modern World

By |2019-05-09T12:13:05-05:00September 6th, 2018|Categories: Books, Education, Evelyn Waugh, Great Books, History, Western Tradition|

The Great Tradition patiently endures, ready to speak on its own behalf, ready to challenge narrow prejudices, ready to examine those with the courage to be interrogated by it, ready to teach those who are willing to be made unfit for the modern world... The following is an excerpt from Richard Gamble, The Great Tradition: Classic [...]

Tradition: The Concept and Its Claim Upon Us

By |2019-04-02T16:01:13-05:00June 19th, 2018|Categories: Culture, Philosophy, Plato, Socrates, Tradition, Western Tradition|Tags: , |

True unity among men must have its roots in that common participation in the holy tradition reaching back to an utterance of God Himself… One wonders whether tradition is not actually anti-historical. It stands in stark contrast to the most impressive and most visible strand of the historical process, namely, the ever-advancing scientific investigation [...]

Is the West Worth Defending?

By |2019-02-19T16:20:51-05:00March 27th, 2018|Categories: Christianity, Culture, Europe, Islam, Joseph Pearce, Western Civilization, Western Tradition|

We should respond to the question of whether the West is worth defending by first asking the more important question of which West it is that we are being asked to defend… There are many people who will cite the West as something which is under threat and something for which we should be [...]

Charles Lindbergh’s Philosophy of Vital Instinct

By |2018-01-04T14:42:21-05:00January 4th, 2018|Categories: Civilization, History, Philosophy, Science, Western Civilization, Western Tradition|

The heightened pace of life in industrial societies, Charles Lindbergh realized, necessitated reflection on what type of life is best suited for man. Which of the two, reason or vital instinct, constitutes the best function of human beings? Which of the two contributes best to man’s happiness and lasting well-being?… Charles Lindbergh begins Autobiography [...]

A Thinker You Should Know: Eric Voegelin

By |2017-12-27T10:34:20-05:00December 27th, 2017|Categories: Conservatism, Eric Voegelin, History, Philosophy, Western Tradition|

Eric Voegelin’s philosophical framework attempted to break down the ideological barriers to the search for order and the recovery of transcendent consciousness… Eric Voegelin’s work is not well known outside a relatively small group of academics and their students. Yet within this domain Voegelin’s influence is impressive. His work has inspired a growing secondary literature [...]