The Classical Tradition in Antebellum America

By |2019-03-10T14:03:22-05:00May 16th, 2017|Tags: , |

The classical curriculum remained the educational gold standard in nineteenth-century America. In fact, its influence grew, as women’s academies with a classical curriculum were founded all over the expanding nation… The Golden Age of the Classics in America: Greece, Rome, and the Antebellum United States by Carl J. Richard (Harvard University Press, 2009) With [...]

Whit Stillman’s “Barcelona” & 1980s America

By |2019-03-10T09:47:47-05:00January 21st, 2017|Tags: , |

Director Whit Stillman understands that America is dominated by a culture that was imported from Europe and is expressed in European tongues and nourished and maintained by contact with Europe… “Amerika, du hast es besser!” Goethe exclaimed. For him America was a land free from the ancient traditions that are Europe’s heritage and curse. [...]

The Classical Education of the Founders

By |2019-03-10T09:48:34-05:00December 11th, 2016|

The American Founders knew from history that a curriculum successful at teaching its graduates to think, communicate, and lead could produce anarchy or tyranny instead of ordered liberty, unless those skills were practiced by leaders committed to virtue and the love of liberty… Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords readers the opportunity [...]

What is the Vocation of the Language Teacher?

By |2019-03-10T09:54:21-05:00August 23rd, 2015|Tags: , |

At first glance, there would seem to be much work awaiting the teacher and scholar of language in the twenty-first century. The powers that be are obsessed with the industrial pollution of water, land, and air. The case seems to be clearer, or foggier, for pollution of language. Useful old words are no longer [...]