Learning Latin the Medieval Way

By |2020-03-21T17:27:41-05:00March 20th, 2020|Categories: Classical Education, Culture, Education, Language, Western Tradition|

Latin, as the primary historical language of erudition and learning in the West, is the sole gateway into the halls of Western thought and humanistic learning. Without the use of this language, we can hardly know ourselves, and certainly not the road that brought us to the modern day. “To read Latin and Greek [...]

Higher Education’s Contemporary Identity Crisis

By |2020-03-04T17:01:04-06:00March 6th, 2020|Categories: Classical Education, Culture, Education, Liberal Learning|

Many factors have conspired to fuel the crises roiling higher education today. Perhaps the most important, and the reason so few institutions react appropriately when they arise, is that colleges and universities are facing a crisis of purpose and identity. Another day, another campus crisis.[1] And yet the truly urgent problems in higher education—students [...]

Mathematics and Liberal Education

By |2020-03-03T13:23:08-06:00March 3rd, 2020|Categories: Classical Education, Education, Liberal Arts, Mathematics, St. John's College|

For most liberal arts colleges, mathematics courses are simply modern math stuck on to a “humanities” program. But if liberal education is not just meant to familiarize students with classics of the humanities, or the polish of culture, but to free the student to find the truth for himself, shouldn’t math be just as [...]

Liberal Education at the Naval Academy

By |2020-02-28T16:25:44-06:00February 28th, 2020|Categories: Classical Education, Culture, Education, Liberal Arts, Western Civilization, Western Tradition|

The Naval Academy is regarded as one of the top liberal arts colleges in the nation, and many attend for that very reason. But what if the Academy’s curriculum does not reflect a true liberal arts education, but a radical distortion of it—a falsehood? The hour is here when midshipmen candidates of the Class [...]

On Teaching, Writing, and Other Discontents

By |2020-02-04T17:16:48-06:00February 4th, 2020|Categories: Civilization, Classical Education, Culture, Education, Liberal Arts, Liberal Learning, Mark Malvasi, Senior Contributors, Western Civilization|

Teaching at a time when civilization is in such obvious disarray and such marked decline imposes even more stringent and pressing obligations on the teacher. I have reached the conclusion that what American teachers must do is really very basic: Teach young men and women how to read and write, how to imagine beyond [...]

Deal Hudson on How to Keep From Losing Your Mind

By |2020-03-04T17:24:23-06:00December 31st, 2019|Categories: Books, Classical Education, Classics, Great Books, Liberal Learning|

In “How to Keep From Losing Your Mind,” Deal W. Hudson sets out to not merely defend—in a traditional and philosophical sense—Western thought but also to share the beauty of culture and the approach he took as he was writing, namely that of “a mounting sense of joy.” How to Keep From Losing Your [...]

The Grace of Owing

By |2019-11-28T00:46:38-06:00November 27th, 2019|Categories: Classical Education, Education, Glenn Arbery, Liberal Arts, Senior Contributors, Thanksgiving, Wyoming Catholic College|

To be truly grateful means that one holds oneself in the grace of owing. It means alert and noble attention to the good intended by the giver. Giving thanks is such a beautifully natural gesture that it seems almost perverse to admire someone for not making it. But Dr. Samuel Johnson earns such admiration [...]

Memory and Its Discontents

By |2019-11-26T21:54:21-06:00November 24th, 2019|Categories: Classical Education, Education, Glenn Arbery, Senior Contributors, Wyoming Catholic College|

The whole thrust of the modern world is toward a slighting of memory. These days, most of us worry more about how much memory our computers have than about developing this profound faculty in ourselves. At Wyoming Catholic College, our students continue a practice of great antiquity—they memorize poetry. Although people have never stopped [...]

The Lost Art of Classical Education

By |2019-10-17T15:25:08-05:00October 17th, 2019|Categories: Classical Education, Classical Learning, Education, Liberal Arts, Liberal Learning|

Graduates sallying forth from the ivied halls need to be free men and women. That is the claim and purpose of the liberal arts. Having had a significant time to ponder and pursue and practice the virtues of freedom, these students can join the ongoing conversation of the ages and continue to refine the [...]

Europe Without Europe

By |2019-10-11T12:43:13-05:00October 9th, 2019|Categories: Classical Education, Education, Europe, Glenn Arbery, Senior Contributors, Wyoming Catholic College|

Europe would not be Europe without the current of tradition once inculcated by classical education. It is such an education we must seek to preserve. Though its immediate effects are not manifest, without it the culture would be ceded to those who wish to shape it for a radically secular agenda, perhaps even a posthuman [...]

Traditional Education & the Future of Europe

By |2019-10-02T15:25:41-05:00October 2nd, 2019|Categories: Classical Education, Conservatism, Europe, Glenn Arbery, Liberal Arts, Senior Contributors, Western Tradition, Wyoming Catholic College|

Near the end of his recent book, Conservatism: An Invitation to the Great Tradition (highly recommended), the English philosopher Roger Scruton makes a very interesting observation about what is possible in America but not in Europe. As he puts it, the burden of American conservatism has been to define the customs and traditions most [...]

Of Apples and Arsenic: Classical vs. Progressive Education

By |2019-09-25T22:04:50-05:00September 25th, 2019|Categories: Classical Education, Education, Liberal Learning, Modernity, Senior Contributors, Steven Jonathan Rummelsburg|

The classical Christian educator and the progressive educator have radically different ideas of education. The two camps have virtually no real common ground concerning education’s means and ends—and the difference between the two is the difference between apples and arsenic. If we reminisce about the days when PBS aired the Anthology documentary on The [...]

Education With Range

By |2019-09-11T10:14:15-05:00September 11th, 2019|Categories: Classical Education, Glenn Arbery, Liberal Arts, Liberal Learning, Senior Contributors, Western Civilization, Wyoming Catholic College|

Liberal arts students are “generalists in a specialized world,” and as a result, they bring many analogies to bear on the problems that they will face on a daily basis in the world of work. And those analogies come from what they actually study, from Homer to field science to statistical analysis to metaphysics. Back [...]