Moving Toward Dread Conformity

By |2020-04-09T01:09:32-05:00April 8th, 2020|Categories: Books, Bradley J. Birzer, Civil Society, Civilization, Conservatism, Robert Nisbet, Senior Contributors|

In 1953, Robert Nisbet published “The Quest for Community,” which reveals to us that our own quest has become something both natural and unnatural. That is, it is natural to desire to belong, but it is horrifically unnatural in the ways we choose to commune. 1953 was a banner year for the conservative soul [...]

Recovering Our Legacy: The Many Uses of the American Past

By |2020-03-08T20:51:13-05:00March 8th, 2020|Categories: American Founding, Citizenship, Civilization, Conservatism, History, Western Civilization|

“Citizenship” means a vivid and enduring sense of one’s full membership in one of the greatest enterprises in human history: the astonishing, perilous, and immensely consequential story of one’s own country. Today, we must redouble our efforts to make that past our own, and then be about the business of passing it on. We [...]

For Thine is the Kingdom: Tom Holland’s “Dominion”

By |2020-03-07T16:53:58-06:00March 7th, 2020|Categories: Books, Christendom, Christianity, Civilization, Culture, Dwight Longenecker, History, Religion, Senior Contributors, Western Civilization|

Like a queen who rides a bicycle, Tom Holland’s “Dominion” is both majestic and down-to-earth. From antiquity to modernity, Mr. Holland traces a sneaky thesis that Christianity has changed the world—transforming it from the inside out. Dominion: How the Christian Revolution Remade the World, by Tom Holland (624 pages, Basic Books, 2019) Every once [...]

The Culture of Conservatism

By |2020-03-02T10:36:37-06:00March 2nd, 2020|Categories: Civilization, Conservatism, Culture, Culture War, Paul Krause, Senior Contributors, Western Civilization|

Understanding who we are is an essential question to culture because the answer we give to that question affects how we understand our history, identity, and the symbolism—sacred and secular—that goes with it. Yet, there are many conservatives who have not the slightest inkling of this phenomenon. What is culture? “Culture War” has reentered [...]

In Defense of Dark Corners

By |2020-02-29T06:46:13-06:00February 29th, 2020|Categories: Architecture, Beauty, Christianity, Civilization, Culture, Dwight Longenecker, Religion, Senior Contributors, Western Civilization|

There are dark corners to be explored in a great church. Instead of vast seating space, bright with electric light, huge speakers hanging from the beams, and padded pews, give me the darkened chapel where ancient monks recited their daily prayers. Give me the dark corner of a crumbling cloister, the dark corner of [...]

Freedom vs. Free Trade

By |2020-02-10T15:41:27-06:00February 10th, 2020|Categories: Adam Smith, American Republic, Civilization, Economics, Free Trade, Joseph Pearce, Political Economy, Senior Contributors|

Can “free trade,” as understood by Adam Smith, bring peace among nations? Or does it just allow the strongest nations to become imperial powers? In answering these questions, we must keep in mind that Smith was an economist and not a prophet. In all normal civilisations the trader existed and must exist. But in [...]

Britain’s Not-So-Evil Empire

By |2020-02-05T14:06:18-06:00February 5th, 2020|Categories: Books, Civilization, England, Europe, History|

“Imperial Legacies” is a spirited polemic that exposes the misunderstandings, cynical disregard, and hypocrisy surrounding the history of the British Empire. Jeremy Black systematically debunks the ideologies of “decolonization” and postcolonial resentment and shows the harm of dismissing British history as a story of monolithic oppression. Imperial Legacies: The British Empire Around the World, [...]

On Teaching, Writing, and Other Discontents

By |2020-02-04T17:16:48-06:00February 4th, 2020|Categories: Civilization, Classical Education, Culture, Education, Liberal Arts, Liberal Learning, Mark Malvasi, Senior Contributors, Western Civilization|

Teaching at a time when civilization is in such obvious disarray and such marked decline imposes even more stringent and pressing obligations on the teacher. I have reached the conclusion that what American teachers must do is really very basic: Teach young men and women how to read and write, how to imagine beyond [...]

Proclamation on National Sanctity of Human Life Day

By |2020-01-24T12:29:17-06:00January 23rd, 2020|Categories: Abortion, Civilization, Presidency|

Every person—the born and unborn, the poor, the downcast, the disabled, the infirm, and the elderly—has inherent value. Although each journey is different, no life is without worth or is inconsequential; the rights of all people must be defended. On National Sanctity of Human Life Day, our Nation proudly and strongly reaffirms our commitment to [...]

Our Real Existential Crisis: Extinction

By |2020-01-21T10:26:51-06:00January 19th, 2020|Categories: Civilization, Culture, Family, Modernity, Pat Buchanan, Western Civilization|

For many First World countries, the most compelling concerns do not involve climate change but population decline. The tribes of Europe, the peoples of almost every country of the Old Continent, are visibly aging, shrinking, and dying. If birth rates do not rise we are talking here about what historians, a century hence, will [...]

“The Speech”: Maintaining Sanity in an Insane World

By |2020-01-10T10:03:34-06:00January 6th, 2020|Categories: Civilization, Culture, Forrest McDonald, Hope, Imagination, Wisdom|

I propose to address the question, how does one survive (and I mean survive as something) in a world that may not? How does one remain sane in a world that is insane; how does one live without fear in a world in which the only certainty is that nothing is certain? Editor's Note: "The [...]

E.E. Evans-Pritchard, Lived Religion, & the Libyan Jihad

By |2019-12-29T00:02:51-06:00December 28th, 2019|Categories: Books, Civilization, Conservatism, History, Islam, Muslim, Religion|

The moral imagination of E.E. Evans-Pritchard’s anthropology discerned great value in the cultures he studied, and he spoke out against the destruction of that value. By doing so he exhibited the finest elements of his own particular Western cultural inheritance, as a Christian, English gentleman, who was later, and appropriately, knighted. Evans-Pritchard’s The Sanusi [...]

The Paleoconservative Eminence? Cardinal Sarah On Identity, Nationality, & Roots

By |2019-12-29T00:31:24-06:00December 28th, 2019|Categories: Books, Civilization, Conservatism, Politics, Western Civilization|

Though counter-globalist, Cardinal Robert Sarah’s “The Day Is Now Far Spent” is not anti-Western, but is an emphatic rejection of liberal anthropology—which strikes him as blasphemous, positing a decontextualized individual, one who needs neither family nor neighbor nor even God Almighty. The Day Is Now Far Spent, by Cardinal Robert Sarah (385 pages, Ignatius [...]