Civilization

Globalization and Our National Anomie

By |2019-11-07T12:43:02-06:00November 10th, 2019|Categories: American Republic, Civilization, Economics, Modernity, Politics|

Technocrats and cosmopolitan politicians are abetting globalization for political influence, economic gain, and utopian delusion. We might add another incentive: A forgotten or deliberately ignored reverence for civic life. Might a hyper-focus on global advancement be contributing to a growing state of national anomie in liberal democracies worldwide? Globalization has become an ineluctable reality. [...]

What is the Meaning of ‘Modest Fashion Week’?

By |2019-11-03T20:09:41-06:00November 3rd, 2019|Categories: Civil Society, Civilization, Culture, Modernity|

Given the overwhelming rule of liberal fashion, modesty would seem a lost cause. Nonetheless, major fashion designers are returning to what was once considered a modern taboo: clothing that leaves more to the imagination, keeps hemlines down and little skin exposed. When you hear the term “modest fashion,” you think of clothing linked to [...]

The Radical Equality of Christianity

By |2019-10-20T00:12:23-06:00October 19th, 2019|Categories: Bradley J. Birzer, Christendom, Christianity, Civilization, Culture, Equality, Religion, Senior Contributors|

In our world of recriminating hatreds—in which we desire more to label those we don’t like as sexist, imperialist, racist, homophobic, transphobic, and, simultaneously, mark ourselves as victims—we often forget some important historical truths. Here’s one we conveniently ignore, dismiss, or mock: Nothing in the world has brought about more equality and justice than [...]

The Shield of Aeneas: Memory and History in Virgil’s “Aeneid”

By |2019-10-01T22:13:05-06:00October 1st, 2019|Categories: Aeneas, Aeneid, Civilization, Conservatism, Great Books, History, Paul Krause, Senior Contributors, Virgil, Western Civilization|

The “Aeneid” was only possible because the Roman people had the memory and consciousness to make it possible. It is up to us to ensure that its living well of memory doesn’t dry up. Without it, the “Aeneid” will pass into the dustbin of history like the corpses of Priam and Pompey. The grandest [...]

China is Fighting for Its Life—and Its Soul

By |2019-09-26T14:05:16-06:00September 28th, 2019|Categories: Christianity, Civilization, Communism, Democracy, Foreign Affairs, Politics|

Today, China has entered a period of general crisis. It was brought about not merely by slow economic growth and its attendant problems, but by a total upheaval touching every aspect of life in the Middle Kingdom: economic and political, intellectual and religious. Mark this date on your calendar: November 19, 2023. This date would [...]

George Kennan’s Diaries

By |2019-09-04T23:49:16-06:00September 4th, 2019|Categories: American Republic, Books, Civilization, Cold War, Europe, Foreign Affairs, Politics, War|

George Kennan was—and remains—an important, even compelling, figure in the early history of the Cold War. But these selections from his voluminous and often overwrought diaries reveal him to have been something other than what this honest, if not always moderate, this calm, but not always cool, and detached professional diplomat took himself to [...]

An Invitation to Augustine’s “City of God”

By |2019-08-25T00:05:09-06:00August 24th, 2019|Categories: Books, Christendom, Civilization, Education, Great Books, Paul Krause, Senior Contributors, St. Augustine|

No work of Christian theology has left such an impact on the world and biblical interpretation and understanding as St. Augustine’s “City of God.” We who read the Bible do so, often unknowingly, through the eyes of the bishop of Hippo. In 410 A.D., the city of Rome was sacked by the Visigoths. Rome [...]

An Immodest Proposal

By |2019-08-17T16:08:22-06:00August 17th, 2019|Categories: Architecture, Civilization, Culture, History|

By a providence that nervous chroniclers call “luck,” the fire in Paris did not ruin the cathedral of Notre Dame. Most of its major parts remain, however fragile. Since so many have offered unsolicited opinions about the future of the cathedral, I would like to make an immodest proposal. A fad for picturesque ruins grew [...]

Brutalist Architecture: The Disappearance of Beauty

By |2019-07-24T22:21:27-06:00July 24th, 2019|Categories: Architecture, Beauty, Civilization, Culture|

Even if we dismiss brutalism as a fad perpetrated by blinkered technocrats and egotistical architects, ugly buildings seem to impose an unconscious psychic tax on the great mass of people. So why have we lost the ability to construct beautiful buildings? Few are immune to the architectural charms of Eastern Europe. Prague’s winding streets [...]

The Importance of Learning to Argue: From Ancient Greece Through the Present

By |2019-06-26T22:48:36-06:00June 26th, 2019|Categories: Civilization, Education, Great Books, Liberal Learning, Socrates, St. John's College|

Perhaps more than ever, we have a need for education of a particular kind: an education that trains one in the habits of exchanging ideas. Not a forum for the debate of settled opinions, where victory is the end, but an education that is the forge and working house of thought itself. In order [...]

Cicero: No Slave of Plato

By |2019-06-07T09:36:17-06:00June 6th, 2019|Categories: American Republic, Books, Bradley J. Birzer, Cicero, Cicero's Republic Series, Civilization, Great Books, Senior Contributors|

Of all the writers who came at the end of the Roman Republic and at the beginning of the Empire, most make note of the loss of traditional morality. It was Cicero who advocated an adherence to nature and order by recognizing the proper meaning of a thing within and around the very existence [...]

Child-Rearing: Notes from a Comparative Cultures Tutorial

By |2019-10-30T11:47:50-06:00June 3rd, 2019|Categories: Civilization, Community, Education, George Stanciu, Senior Contributors, Wisdom|

Unprecedented in history is the development of the adolescent—a period of life in which one is isolated from childhood and maturity. Child-rearing practices vary from culture to culture, and many Americans are shocked to discover that the most turbulent period of their lives was a cultural phenomenon. The confusion, rebellion, and search for identity [...]