Advancing in Darkness: Some Reflections on our Ahistorical Present

By |2021-05-11T09:24:48-05:00May 9th, 2021|Categories: Civilization, Education, History, Liberal Learning, Modernity|

The study of history in public schools should be conducted with an eye to “fostering good citizenship.” But it should do more than that. It should foster good human beings—human beings with broad minds and contemplative souls who appreciate the power of ideas. “If history be, in truth, the self consciousness of humanity, the ‘self [...]

Decadence, Love, & Lust: Understanding the “Star Wars” Prequels

By |2021-05-03T16:25:25-05:00May 3rd, 2021|Categories: Civilization, Culture, Film, Love, Paul Krause, Senior Contributors|

The original “Star Wars” trilogy explored the crises of identity, love, and redemption in the midst of a technologically tyrannical world. The prequel trilogy, by contrast, is primarily concerned with themes of decadence, corporate domination, political corruption, and the insidious influence that these forces have on love. Star Wars is one of most successful film [...]

Saving the Classics From Cancel Culture

By |2021-04-14T11:06:42-05:00April 23rd, 2021|Categories: Civilization, Classics, Culture, Great Books, Joseph Pearce, Literature, Senior Contributors|

Joseph Pearce, series editor of the Ignatius Critical Editions, is interviewed by Paul Senz. Paul Senz: What prompted you and Ignatius Press to produce the series of Ignatius Critical Editions? Joseph Pearce: As someone who has taught undergraduate students for many years, I am well aware of the hijacking of the study of literature by [...]

Ideological Neo-Colonialism In The 21st Century

By |2021-04-22T10:02:48-05:00April 15th, 2021|Categories: Books, Civilization, David Deavel, Politics, Senior Contributors, Sexuality|

Obianuju Ekeocha’s “Target Africa” exposes the imposition of destructive, elite American values on Africans by our government, our educational institutions, and our foundations. These “neo-colonialists” treat Africans as children by handing down to them decisions about how to live—decisions that have failed spectacularly in the Western world itself. Target Africa: Ideological Neo-Colonialism In The Twenty-First [...]

Building Back Better, You Say? It’s All About Scale

By |2021-03-19T11:13:00-05:00March 22nd, 2021|Categories: Architecture, Civilization, Culture, Economics|

With all the vexations of Covid-19, economic forces are undermining suburban life. The suburbs, tricked out as they were for incessant motoring, present a more tragic picture as we leave mass motoring behind: slums, salvage, ruins. But the good news is there is another way, and it’s a better way: the traditional town. In these [...]

Tocqueville and Totalitarian Democracy in America

By |2021-02-24T16:39:22-06:00February 24th, 2021|Categories: Alexis de Tocqueville, American Republic, Civilization, Community, Equality, Freedom|

American democracy has proven to be a success in its representation of interests but a failure in cultivating citizenship; it has protected some civil liberties while allowing others to erode away. One lesson we can draw from its history of successes and failures is this: For a republic to succeed, institutions are not enough; civic [...]

Robert Nisbet’s “The Social Group in French Thought”

By |2021-02-24T19:24:01-06:00February 24th, 2021|Categories: Bradley J. Birzer, Civilization, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Political Philosophy, Politics, Robert Nisbet, Senior Contributors|

In “The Social Group in French Thought,” Robert Nisbet explains that social philosophers such as Bodin, Hobbes, and Rousseau undermined and sabotaged private law and intermediary institutions. Their thought culminated in the French Revolution and in its radical and nationalist legislation. Robert Nisbet’s dissertation began by lamenting that the history of freedom has been written [...]

Whittaker Chambers & the Nashville Agrarians: The Ground Beneath Their Feet

By |2021-02-15T13:08:08-06:00February 10th, 2021|Categories: Agrarianism, Civilization, Culture, South, Southern Agrarians|

The kinship between the Nashville Agrarians and Whittaker Chambers is seen in three main ways: the farming life itself, the concept of private property, and the religious dimension of human existence. Beyond the similarities and differences between them, Chambers emerges as a singular figure who, more so than the Nashville group, provides a model for [...]

Furies: The Myopia of the Present Moment

By |2021-01-15T16:52:37-06:00January 15th, 2021|Categories: Civilization, Classics, Glenn Arbery, Great Books, Senior Contributors, Wyoming Catholic College|

Turning away from the news and attending with imagination to the “Oresteia” takes faith, both in God and in the wisdom of our forebears. This will be a worthier endeavor, both for the present moment and for the time to come, than trying to tear down the very structures that give us the promise of [...]

“The Speech”: Maintaining Sanity in an Insane World

By |2021-01-08T09:36:34-06:00January 6th, 2021|Categories: Civilization, Culture, Forrest McDonald, Hope, Imagination, Timeless Essays, Wisdom|

I propose to address the question, how does one survive—and I mean survive as something—in a world that may not? How does one remain sane in a world that is insane; how does one live without fear in a world in which the only certainty is that nothing is certain? As the new year arrives, [...]

What Does It Mean to Be a Person of Culture?

By |2021-04-25T17:28:27-05:00January 1st, 2021|Categories: Christianity, Civilization, Culture, Liberal Learning, Michael De Sapio, Senior Contributors, Timeless Essays, Western Civilization|

True culture is a liberation from the ephemeral, a journey toward permanence and value. A cultured life, therefore, consists in more than just piling up facts; it must include reflecting on the meaning of man’s works—especially those works which have stood the test time—and how they fit into the larger scheme of reality. Attempts to [...]

The Suicide of a Civilization

By |2020-12-09T15:59:46-06:00December 9th, 2020|Categories: Christianity, Civilization, Culture, Death|

Suppose an anthropologist were asked, apart from the sound and fury of current politics, what were the signs of a dying culture, or a culture committing suicide? What might he respond, as following from human nature and from the terms of the question itself? What might he notice in our own? Such a culture would [...]

Neighborhoods: A Forgotten School of Family & Social Flourishing

By |2020-12-02T15:48:40-06:00December 2nd, 2020|Categories: Civil Society, Civilization, Community, Family|

The neighbourhood can give one a greater sense of a geographic and social whole. It can serve as a bridge between the home and the larger society. The limited control we have over who our neighbours are reflects the normal conditions of a large society. How well do you know your neighbours? How much does [...]

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