“Ode to Death”

By |2020-03-13T17:54:37-05:00November 11th, 2018|Categories: Audio/Video, Death, Gustav Holst, Memorial Day, Music, Veterans Day, War, World War I|

Gustav Holst wrote his "Ode to Death" in 1918-1919 in the wake of World War I. Though he received a medical exemption from military service, Holst had composer-friends who served (Ralph Vaughan Williams) and died (George Butterworth) in the horrific combat on the Western Front. The text of "Ode to Death" sets a section of [...]

What We Know About Evil, Hell, and Final Damnation

By |2018-10-28T02:47:51-05:00October 27th, 2018|Categories: Books, Christianity, Death, Evil, Pope Benedict XVI, Theology|

Present in all love is the love that God has for each of His creatures. In loving our neighbor, even the worst sinner, we love what God loves in him. But God’s love for us includes a final judgment about our lives... “Hell is the place God created for the angels who rebelled against him. [...]

Death and Blind Hopes

By |2019-10-16T13:59:45-05:00October 23rd, 2018|Categories: Death, George Stanciu, Hope, Mathematics, Theology|

Because of intense fear, we refuse to acknowledge that nothing in this world is permanent, that everything perishes, that soon we will be no more. Lodged within every human heart is the blind hope that death comes to others, not to us... Prometheus was the one Olympian god to rebel against Zeus’ plan to wipe [...]

G.K. Chesterton’s “A Ballade of Suicide”

By |2018-10-28T21:50:37-05:00October 14th, 2018|Categories: Christian Humanism, Death, G.K. Chesterton, Literature, Poetry, Timeless Essays|

Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords readers the opportunity to join Titus Techera as he reflects on the meaning of G.K. Chesterton's "A Ballade of Suicide." —W. Winston Elliott III, Publisher G.K. Chesterton published "A Ballade of Suicide" in his journal, The Eye-Witness, September 21, 1911. This is a ballade, an old French form [...]

A Death in New Mexico: The Old Healer

By |2020-08-19T00:08:46-05:00September 28th, 2018|Categories: Death, George Stanciu, Religion, Science, Tradition, Tragedy|

Maybe because I am particularly dense, I learned nothing of value for human living from all the brilliant mathematicians, esteemed physicists, and distinguished academics I have known. Instead, my mentor was a "curandero," a traditional healer from Northern New Mexico. Even his death taught me a profound lesson about life. When I moved to Santa [...]

Distracting Ourselves From Death

By |2020-10-14T00:31:28-05:00September 14th, 2018|Categories: Christianity, Death, Philosophy, Religion|

Although the prospect of death makes us miserable, it forces us to confront our mortality and search for a remedy, if we do not immediately numb ourselves with the drug of distraction. "Soles occidere et redire possunt [Suns are able to die and rise again]" —Gaius Valerius Catullus, Carmen 5.[1] One morning, as I walked out [...]

O Sting, Where Is Thy Death?

By |2018-08-28T13:13:52-05:00August 28th, 2018|Categories: Catholicism, Christianity, Death, Existence of God, Joseph Pearce, Music|

In a somewhat bizarre recent interview with the National Catholic Register, the aging rock star, Sting, who eons ago had been lead singer of the rock band The Police, waxed in a bemused and confused way about his relationship with the Catholic faith, in which he was raised but which he has abandoned. He gave [...]

The Wages of Sin: Jean-Pierre Melville’s Doomed Universe

By |2019-09-28T09:50:03-05:00July 25th, 2018|Categories: Death, Film, StAR|

In Jean-Pierre Melville’s Le Doulos, it is as if there is an existential darkness present throughout. In this world, no matter how cunning the schemes or how fail-safe the get-away plans are, for all concerned there is a retribution coming. In Melville’s cinematic universe the wages of sin are always death… Recently, at London’s British Film [...]

Madness and Death: Alban Berg’s “Wozzeck”

By |2020-05-15T09:09:24-05:00July 14th, 2018|Categories: Culture, Death, Music, Theater|

Alban Berg's Wozzeck (first premiered in 1925) tells the story of a man who is slowly breaking due to insanity. Let us draw our attention to Act III Scene IV of the opera. In this late scene, extreme musical conventions accelerate the story and seem to lead the deranged titular character to his death. The [...]

The Death of God and the New Stories

By |2019-07-10T23:21:51-05:00May 20th, 2018|Categories: Christianity, Death, Existence of God, George Stanciu, Great Books, Religion, Science, St. John's College|

The narratives of science and Christianity are obviously not novels, nor works of fiction, for both claim to tell the true story of humankind—where we came from, what we are, and where we are going. To determine if either of these narratives is true, we must assess the plot… In 1882, Nietzsche’s madman ran [...]

Can an Alfie Evans Case Happen in the United States?

By |2018-05-17T00:29:18-05:00May 17th, 2018|Categories: Christianity, Culture, Death, Europe, Government, Politics, Pope Francis, Rights, Rule of Law|

In the case of the now-deceased toddler, Alfie Evans, the British government, through its Royal College of Pediatrics and its courts, had legal authority. Alfie had legal “interests,” which the government defined in his case, but he did not have any “rights.” Alfie’s parents only had a right to be heard; they had no substantive rights [...]

Modern America: A Disneyland Dystopia

By |2019-11-21T12:04:10-06:00May 14th, 2018|Categories: C.S. Lewis, Culture, Death, Dwight Longenecker, Dystopia|

In modern America, all the dystopian horrors exist hand-in-hand with what seems like one perpetual theme-park existence. The war, torture, abortions, castrations, murders, suicides, drug addiction, homelessness, and medical horrors reside side-by-side with the smiling face of America, where everyone has perfect teeth and waves out a cheerful, “Have a nice day!”… Having just [...]

Requiem for His Daughter: Franz Schmidt’s Lament

By |2020-11-01T16:10:28-06:00May 9th, 2018|Categories: Audio/Video, Culture, Death, History, Music|

Franz Schmidt’s lament makes grief beautiful. It elevates it to something irreproachable, like snow on a mountain peak that, when you’re stumbling around in it, stings and chills and makes you lose your footing, but from the distance, oh, the inexpressible beauty. As the story has it, when Hungarian-born twentieth century composer Franz Schmidt received [...]

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