Faith

The Comforts of Religion: Gustave Flaubert’s “Madame Bovary”

By |2019-11-30T03:15:16-06:00November 30th, 2019|Categories: Books, Christianity, Europe, Faith, Fiction, Imagination, Literature, Religion|

The nineteenth century was a difficult and dynamic period for the French nation, as citizens of all classes and philosophical persuasions struggled to come to terms with modernity. These struggles are reflected in Gustave Flaubert’s first novel, Madame Bovary, published as a complete text in 1857. The story is well-known: Emma Bovary finds herself [...]

Return of the Strong Gods

By |2019-11-09T22:04:01-06:00November 9th, 2019|Categories: Books, Culture, Dwight Longenecker, Faith, Family, Senior Contributors, Western Civilization, Worldview|

R.R. Reno in “Return of the Strong Gods” argues that we need a return to the pillars that represent classic human values: the home, the country, and the religion. He calls for true patriotism rather than nationalism, marriage and family instead of a sexual free-for-all, and historic Christianity instead of do-it-yourself “spirituality.” Return of [...]

“Reason, Faith, & the Struggle for Western Civilization”: Illuminating the Past & Present

By |2019-08-07T22:05:08-06:00August 7th, 2019|Categories: Christianity, Faith, History, Philosophy, Pope Benedict XVI, Reason, Western Civilization, Western Tradition|

It is a bright note of hope, set against the present daunting darkness, that shines throughout Samuel Gregg’s “Reason, Faith, and the Struggle for Western Civilization,” both illuminating the past and shedding much-needed light on the present situation. Reason, Faith, and the Struggle for Western Civilization, by Samuel Gregg (256 pages, Gateway Editions, 2019) [...]

Who Was Philip Ludwell III?

By |2019-06-13T21:55:21-06:00June 13th, 2019|Categories: American Founding, Christianity, Faith|

Philip Ludwell III is the first known convert to Eastern Orthodox Christianity in the Americas. He was a prominent figure in pre-revolutionary Virginia and a relative by blood or marriage of many great early figures in American history, from George Washington to Richard Henry Lee of the great Lee family of Virginia. The scion [...]

Faith, Family, and the Future of Europe

By |2019-05-12T00:09:57-06:00May 11th, 2019|Categories: Europe, Faith, Family, Joseph Pearce, Senior Contributors, Western Civilization|

Europe has a suicidal tendency to ignore the problem underlying its decay: a lack of faith and families. But perhaps, in light of recent legislation in Poland and Hungary rooted in faith and family and the future, perhaps we may be seeing the sun rising in Europe’s East, even as we see it setting [...]

Uncle Sam’s Good Servant But God’s First

By |2019-01-13T22:05:07-06:00January 13th, 2019|Categories: Christendom, Christianity, Civil Society, Faith, Joseph Pearce, Nationalism, Patriotism, Secularism, Senior Contributors|

In order to truly serve their nation, true Americans must fearlessly criticize her for her waywardness. More importantly, we must evangelize her, bringing her to the fullness of faith in the God under Whom she owes her existence. Only when America kneels before her true God will she become truly civilized… One of the [...]

Christianity’s Home in Homelessness

By |2019-02-18T02:39:13-06:00December 23rd, 2018|Categories: Christian Humanism, Christianity, Culture, Faith, Featured, G.K. Chesterton|

Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords our readers the opportunity to join Casey Spinks, as he examines the Christian notion of home. —W. Winston Elliott III, Publisher The history of Western philosophy may be but a footnote on Plato, but the history of the whole of Western philosophy, theology, politics, science, art, and [...]

America’s Ship of Fools

By |2018-12-15T22:18:22-06:00December 15th, 2018|Categories: American Republic, Civil Society, Civilization, Faith, Government, Politics, Religion, Western Civilization|

Although somewhat overshadowed by the allegory of the Cave, the myth of the ring of Gyges, and other powerful images found in Plato’s Republic, the account of the ship of fools is still memorable and compelling. While Socrates—the Athenian philosopher and mentor of Plato—is discussing with his young friends the nature of justice and the [...]

Two Kinds of Jesuits

By |2018-11-03T23:58:27-06:00November 3rd, 2018|Categories: Christianity, Culture War, Dwight Longenecker, Ethics, Faith, Religion, Senior Contributors|

Whereas heroic missionary effort and martyrdom seemed the hallmark of the first Jesuits, the second generation moved in a different direction... In the Roman calendar, October is a harvest for militant saints. Kicking off with Saint Therese of Lisieux who proclaimed, “Sanctity! It must be won at the point of a sword!”, the calendar marches [...]

Modeling Manhood: From Homer to Paul

By |2019-06-17T16:50:44-06:00October 6th, 2018|Categories: Christian Living, Christianity, Faith, Family, Homer, Odyssey|

In Homer’s epic poem, The Odyssey, a Greek war hero faces imposing challenges in his long journey home. After decimating the armies of Troy, King Odysseus sets out for Ithaca only to find himself wrestling against more formidable foes. For ten years the whims of gods and the winds of fate hinder his journey, while a [...]