Renewing and Rejecting: Comparing Architecture and Music

By |2020-11-23T17:14:43-06:00November 23rd, 2020|Categories: Architecture, Faith, Featured, Music, Roger Scruton, Timeless Essays, Tradition, Western Civilization|

At a certain stage and for no apparent reason, self-criticism among those of us in the West gave way to repudiation. Instead of subjecting our inheritance to a critical evaluation, seeking what is good in it and trying to understand and endorse the ties that binds us to it, a great many of those [...]

Flaubert’s Fictional Faith

By |2020-11-14T09:49:27-06:00November 14th, 2020|Categories: Beauty, Catholicism, Christianity, Faith, Fiction, Literature|

Although Gustave Flaubert professed to be a mystic who believed in nothing, in “A Simple Heart,” he gives us an unironic portrait of guileless faith that melds the hagiographer’s preoccupation with sanctity with the modern fictionist’s oblique incorporation of symbols. In so doing, the professed atheist purifies the cynical soul. Since doubt was carried [...]

Thomas Kuhn and the Persistence of Myth, Magic, and Genealogies

By |2020-09-22T11:03:31-05:00September 22nd, 2020|Categories: Faith, History, Myth, Science, Truth|

The relationship between science and the humanities is unavoidable simply because genealogies, in the end, are an extension of man’s thinking that combines reality with myth. Thomas Kuhn seemed to accept this fact, but today his colleagues’ aversion toward myth and magic has effected new iterations of magic that are devoid of meaning and [...]

“Andreas” & the Redemptive Possibilities of the Past

By |2020-08-26T11:17:09-05:00August 27th, 2020|Categories: Christianity, Faith, History, Literature, Poetry|

In the Old English poem, “Andreas,” the fate of the old giant-work and the fate of the pagans were linked. The pagan stones became the site of a church—not only because of the miraculous flood, but because of the faith of the Apostle Andrew in the redemptive possibilities of the past. In the context [...]

“The Language of God”: The Man Who Saw God Through a Microscope

By |2020-07-07T10:41:40-05:00July 7th, 2020|Categories: Books, Christianity, Darwin, Existence of God, Faith, Nature, Reason, Science, St. Augustine|

In “The Language of God,” Francis Collins breaks into the debate between faith and reason with intelligible writing and with the strength of his experience as a scientist and the nine-years director of the Human Genome Project. He is a man who found God while deciphering the hidden codes of life. The Language of [...]

T.S. Eliot and Reconversion on Ash Wednesday

By |2020-02-25T22:13:35-06:00February 25th, 2020|Categories: Ash Wednesday, Christianity, Faith, Imagination, Literature, Poetry, T.S. Eliot|

T.S. Eliot’s “Ash-Wednesday” helps us to consider our earthly transience, just as Ash Wednesday reminds us of this same fact that our time on earth is passing. Nel mezzo del cammin di nostra vita . . . There is something telling about man’s tendency to view his life as a journey, for journeys convey [...]

The Comforts of Religion: Gustave Flaubert’s “Madame Bovary”

By |2019-11-30T03:15:16-06:00November 30th, 2019|Categories: Books, Christianity, Europe, Faith, Fiction, Imagination, Literature, Religion|

The nineteenth century was a difficult and dynamic period for the French nation, as citizens of all classes and philosophical persuasions struggled to come to terms with modernity. These struggles are reflected in Gustave Flaubert’s first novel, Madame Bovary, published as a complete text in 1857. The story is well-known: Emma Bovary finds herself [...]

Return of the Strong Gods

By |2019-11-09T22:04:01-06:00November 9th, 2019|Categories: Books, Culture, Dwight Longenecker, Faith, Family, Senior Contributors, Western Civilization, Worldview|

R.R. Reno in “Return of the Strong Gods” argues that we need a return to the pillars that represent classic human values: the home, the country, and the religion. He calls for true patriotism rather than nationalism, marriage and family instead of a sexual free-for-all, and historic Christianity instead of do-it-yourself “spirituality.” Return of [...]

“Reason, Faith, & the Struggle for Western Civilization”: Illuminating the Past & Present

By |2019-08-07T22:05:08-05:00August 7th, 2019|Categories: Christianity, Faith, History, Philosophy, Pope Benedict XVI, Reason, Western Civilization, Western Tradition|

It is a bright note of hope, set against the present daunting darkness, that shines throughout Samuel Gregg’s “Reason, Faith, and the Struggle for Western Civilization,” both illuminating the past and shedding much-needed light on the present situation. Reason, Faith, and the Struggle for Western Civilization, by Samuel Gregg (256 pages, Gateway Editions, 2019) [...]

Faith, Family, and the Future of Europe

By |2019-05-12T00:09:57-05:00May 11th, 2019|Categories: Europe, Faith, Family, Joseph Pearce, Senior Contributors, Western Civilization|

Europe has a suicidal tendency to ignore the problem underlying its decay: a lack of faith and families. But perhaps, in light of recent legislation in Poland and Hungary rooted in faith and family and the future, perhaps we may be seeing the sun rising in Europe’s East, even as we see it setting [...]

Uncle Sam’s Good Servant But God’s First

By |2020-06-24T23:20:17-05:00January 13th, 2019|Categories: Christendom, Christianity, Civil Society, Faith, Joseph Pearce, Nationalism, Patriotism, Secularism, Senior Contributors|

In order to truly serve their nation, true Americans must fearlessly criticize her for her waywardness. More importantly, we must evangelize her, bringing her to the fullness of faith in the God under Whom she owes her existence. Only when America kneels before her true God will she become truly civilized. One of the [...]

How St. John Speaks to Us Today

By |2019-11-14T10:11:01-06:00January 12th, 2019|Categories: Character, Christian Living, Christianity, Faith, Love|

The apostle Paul counted all things as rubbish except for one thing: an intimate knowledge of Christ characterized by knowing him in the power of his resurrection, the fellowship of his suffering, and an identification with his death. Immersion into the life and writings of St. John is a journey into the mind and heart [...]

Christianity’s Home in Homelessness

By |2019-02-18T02:39:13-06:00December 23rd, 2018|Categories: Christian Humanism, Christianity, Culture, Faith, Featured, G.K. Chesterton|

Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords our readers the opportunity to join Casey Spinks, as he examines the Christian notion of home. —W. Winston Elliott III, Publisher The history of Western philosophy may be but a footnote on Plato, but the history of the whole of Western philosophy, theology, politics, science, art, and [...]

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