The Virtuous Soldier

By |2020-11-11T09:38:11-06:00November 11th, 2020|Categories: Veterans Day, Virtue, War|

The virtuous soldier is prudent in military matters, possessing a love for the homeland. The one who serves virtuously does so with perseverance and honesty. A soldier who takes virtue to heart is not only a valiant servant to the nation. The virtuous soldier is also a faithful servant of God. Today’s celebration of [...]

Pietas and Fallen Cities: America and Vergil’s “Aeneid”

By |2020-09-28T00:48:46-05:00September 27th, 2020|Categories: Aeneid, American Republic, Civilization, Culture, Great Books, Religion, Virgil, Virtue|

Authentic righteousness for a nation of natives, settlers, immigrants, and refugees requires the same whether for America or Vergil’s Rome: pietas. This is devotion to family, community, country, and deity. One so devoted does not fear the sublimation of the self in the fulfillment of these duties, for it is in the pursuit of [...]

Aristotle Contra Mundum: The Woke Come for the Philosopher

By |2020-09-20T15:15:19-05:00September 19th, 2020|Categories: Aristotle, Christianity, Equality, Great Books, Liberalism, Politics, Virtue|

Professor Agnes Callard is admirable in her unwillingness to cancel Aristotle. In light of recent events, she might find his views are not so much prejudiced as they are realistic, and, on that note, timeless, unlike the egalitarian utopias which liberals are always chasing. The philosopher had a disposition toward the world around him [...]

The Goods of Friendship

By |2020-07-01T11:35:17-05:00July 1st, 2020|Categories: Aristotle, Friendship, Great Books, Virtue|

In “Nicomachean Ethics,” Aristotle offers students a refreshing alternative to the instrumentality of modern life: the pursuit of goodness. Goodness inspires honor, and mutual honor is the stuff of friendships of virtue. These are the friendships which yield the greatest happiness. Recently, I had the great pleasure afforded by technology in our chaotic, pandemic [...]

Poetry as a Form of Life

By |2020-06-19T14:19:42-05:00June 19th, 2020|Categories: Art, Beauty, Culture, Literature, Modernity, Poetry, Virtue, Writing|

The poet’s power is a power to disclose, extol, and communicate the sanctity of experience, protecting it from the ordinary disorientation of the quotidian. The poet calls attention to the ordinary patterns of human life, and is a call to contentment, that rarest of achievements. To attribute to poetry such power is to ascribe [...]

A Curious Education: Winston Churchill and the Teaching of a Statesman

By |2020-06-18T00:19:08-05:00June 17th, 2020|Categories: Character, Culture, Education, History, Virtue, Winston Churchill|

Winston Churchill’s education deserves close study because it shaped his evolution from unsteady boyhood to rational statesmanship. It was this education that enabled him to exercise discernment and discover what was advantageous and disadvantageous, just and unjust, so that—whether in peacetime or in war—he could demonstrate remarkable qualities and serve the country he loved. [...]

In Defense of Those Who Protect Us

By |2020-06-08T00:31:36-05:00June 8th, 2020|Categories: Conservatism, J.R.R. Tolkien, Louis Markos, Memorial Day, Military, Timeless Essays, Veterans Day, Virtue, War|

We must respect the difficulty and danger of the jobs of those who protect us and stop willfully blinding ourselves to the unpleasant realities around us. Let us defend, support, and celebrate our police and our military; without them, our world would be a far more perilous place. This semester, I am happily exercising [...]

Odin on Classical Education

By |2020-06-02T02:35:09-05:00June 3rd, 2020|Categories: Classical Education, Classical Learning, Culture, Education, Humanities, Liberal Learning, Myth, Virtue|

Schools now attempt to produce students who will contribute to the workforce and, really, nothing more. Students are now frequently viewed as tools for the end of GDP; this demeaning use of a person shows that a pragmatic notion of education entirely misses the mark. Birth to school. School to college. College to job. [...]

What Might a Federalist Paper “No. 86” Have Looked Like?

By |2020-05-29T16:38:12-05:00May 29th, 2020|Categories: American Republic, Federalist Papers, Imagination, Modernity, Virtue, Wisdom|

To the People of the State of New York: Having previously exposed the unfailing dangers of Faction, the more pernicious and enticing danger of Efficiency may be revealed. Indeed, Efficiency, properly ordered as a servant, aids humanity in frugality. An efficient farmer may feed more people; an efficient merchant may employ more people; an [...]

Charm and the Civilized Life

By |2020-05-18T18:30:26-05:00May 18th, 2020|Categories: Books, Character, Culture, Michael De Sapio, Modernity, Senior Contributors, Virtue|

In his latest book, Joseph Epstein takes on the elusive topic of charm, which consists of being pleasing to others and making the world seem a better place. Charm radiates light, order, and good humor; it is cool and calm, not hot and excited. Perhaps, like beauty, charm is one of the blessedly “useless” [...]

A Republic If You Can Keep It: Religion, Civil Society, & America’s Founding

By |2020-06-22T12:07:33-05:00May 9th, 2020|Categories: American Founding, American Republic, Civil Society, Morality, Religion, Virtue|

Though civil libertarians rightly point out the dangers of an unchecked government, they blissfully ignore the dangers of an unchecked, unrestrained populace. It is thus worthwhile to return to the founders and examine what role they desired religion and morality to play in their new Republic. The story goes that as Benjamin Franklin departed [...]

The Plight of the Conservative Artist in a Liberal World

By |2020-04-30T10:26:47-05:00April 29th, 2020|Categories: Art, Culture, Morality, Virtue|

The left has long understood the power of the arts in furthering radical ideas, in a way conservatives have largely failed to grasp in defending theirs. Conservatives with the financial means must increase their support of conservative artists for the sake of a culture in immediate need of the wisdom that a long intellectual, [...]

Antony and Eros: A Suicide Pact

By |2020-04-21T09:45:10-05:00April 22nd, 2020|Categories: Imagination, Joseph Pearce, Literature, Love, Modernity, Morality, Senior Contributors, Virtue, William Shakespeare|

There are none so blind as those who can only see themselves. This is the tragedy of narcissism or what the psychologist Paul Vitz has called selfism. The modern narcissist no longer looks at himself in a pool of water, or even in the mirror; he sees himself in countless selfies, the icons of [...]

Love in Time of Plague: Manzoni’s “The Betrothed”

By |2020-04-24T12:41:36-05:00April 21st, 2020|Categories: Books, Character, Coronavirus, Imagination, Literature, Morality, Virtue|

No book shows how little we care to find out the truth, how little we know ourselves, how even less we know others, how rumor, prejudice, and illusion, rule our world as Alessandro Manzoni’s "The Betrothed." Set in Lombardy in the 17th century, it covers the whole horror of a plague in whose deadly grip [...]

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