Designed for Distraction

By |2021-03-25T17:29:14-05:00March 29th, 2021|Categories: Architecture, Culture, Science, Technology|

The internet is like a city; websites are like buildings. In the same way that architecture works in and through the technological design of the building and produces an aesthetic effect, so does web design. Therefore, the websites we visit are forming our souls, not merely by their content, but also through their design. The [...]

Craftsmanship Can Save the World: The American College of Building Arts

By |2021-03-28T21:14:53-05:00March 28th, 2021|Categories: Architecture, Beauty, Joseph Pearce, Labor/Work, Senior Contributors, Timeless Essays|

The American College of the Building Arts (ACBA) is unlike any college that I know. Indeed it is the only school in the entire country offering a four-year degree in traditional craftsmanship. “Along with pens, paper, books, and computers, students here learn with trowels, chisels, hammers, and anvils,” writes Logan Ward in Garden & Gun. [...]

Building Back Better, You Say? It’s All About Scale

By |2021-03-19T11:13:00-05:00March 22nd, 2021|Categories: Architecture, Civilization, Culture, Economics|

With all the vexations of Covid-19, economic forces are undermining suburban life. The suburbs, tricked out as they were for incessant motoring, present a more tragic picture as we leave mass motoring behind: slums, salvage, ruins. But the good news is there is another way, and it’s a better way: the traditional town. In these [...]

Where We Find God: The Significance of Church Architecture

By |2021-02-10T12:04:59-06:00February 13th, 2021|Categories: Architecture, Beauty, Christianity, Culture|

The architecture of the church—the spire, the stained-glass windows, the cold, the acoustics, the hardness of pews—fills us with a sense of the sublime. Its greatness creates in us a feeling not of inferiority but of human scale, a scale that must be remembered in the face of God. For those of us of faith, [...]

The Mellon Foundation Goes Woke

By |2021-01-08T09:35:10-06:00January 9th, 2021|Categories: Architecture, Beauty, Culture, Music, Uncategorized|

The Mellon Foundation’s "Monuments Project" is totalitarian in its proposed scope and radical vision, something utterly in conflict with American pluralism and preference for localism, a brazen effort to wrest control away from communities as to the state of their own public spaces. Not to be outdone by The New York Times' 1619 Project, the Mellon Foundation [...]

Hagia Sophia: Once a Church, Always a Church

By |2020-12-27T10:02:59-06:00December 27th, 2020|Categories: Architecture, Christianity, Culture, Religion, Secularism, Timeless Essays, Western Civilization|

Every awe-inspiring element of Hagia Sophia is a testament to our Christian faith that should make us feel proud of our cultural heritage, even in today’s society where our churches are defaced and adapted for secular use. The church is undeniably Christian in spirit and character, no matter how many times its use is altered. [...]

The Road Away From Conservatism

By |2020-12-10T16:10:46-06:00December 10th, 2020|Categories: Architecture, Conservatism, Culture, England, History|

The project of the Stonehenge tunnel is a financially irresponsible state goal endeavour during a time of fiscal crisis and contraction, ignoring the reverence of heritage and undermining the social contract. From the bulldozing of Victorian buildings to the sacrilegious tunnelling, England’s Conservative Party is not acting conservative. The greatest obstacle facing Boris Johnson is [...]

Renewing and Rejecting: Comparing Architecture and Music

By |2020-11-23T17:14:43-06:00November 23rd, 2020|Categories: Architecture, Faith, Featured, Music, Roger Scruton, Timeless Essays, Tradition, Western Civilization|

At a certain stage and for no apparent reason, self-criticism among those of us in the West gave way to repudiation. Instead of subjecting our inheritance to a critical evaluation, seeking what is good in it and trying to understand and endorse the ties that binds us to it, a great many of those appointed [...]

The Problem With Architectural “Genius”

By |2020-09-10T13:34:31-05:00September 18th, 2020|Categories: Architecture, Culture, Modernity, Roger Scruton, Timeless Essays|

The pursuit of genius in architecture is what has most contributed to the unstitching of our urban fabric, giving us those buildings in outlandish shapes and unsightly materials that take a chunk of the city and make it into somewhere else. Cooper Union New Academic Building For the truly great projects, architects are [...]

Demystifying the Louvre

By |2020-08-26T16:37:23-05:00August 26th, 2020|Categories: Architecture, Art, Books, Culture, History, Western Civilization|

In recounting the growth of one of the West’s grandest cultural achievements, James Gardner is an admirably conservative guide to the impressive qualities of the Louvre. Today when Western civilization is under attack as never before, it is a paradox that the encyclopedic art museum, one of the characteristic achievements of this civilization, is more [...]

The Notre Dame Fire: A Sign of the Times

By |2020-04-15T14:48:06-05:00April 15th, 2020|Categories: Architecture, Beauty, Christianity, Culture, Western Civilization|

Our Western culture is on fire and not in a good way. In the midst of a pandemic, economic chaos, and continuous social deconstruction, the burning of Notre Dame paints a startlingly fitting image of the West. The Memory of the Ideal Architecture is the structured form of the Ideal; it is the culmination of [...]

In Defense of Dark Corners

By |2020-02-29T06:46:13-06:00February 29th, 2020|Categories: Architecture, Beauty, Christianity, Civilization, Culture, Dwight Longenecker, Religion, Senior Contributors, Western Civilization|

There are dark corners to be explored in a great church. Instead of vast seating space, bright with electric light, huge speakers hanging from the beams, and padded pews, give me the darkened chapel where ancient monks recited their daily prayers. Give me the dark corner of a crumbling cloister, the dark corner of a [...]

A Conversation With Art Historian Liz Lev

By |2020-02-22T19:20:01-06:00February 22nd, 2020|Categories: Architecture, Art, Culture, Dwight Longenecker, History, Rome, Senior Contributors|

The highlight of a pilgrimage to Rome is to join Liz Lev for one of her increasingly famous tours of the Vatican Museums. Her high-energy presentation, vast knowledge, and enthusiasm are matched by her warm welcome, sense of humor, and genuine faith. […]

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