Nayeli Riano

About Nayeli Riano

Nayeli Riano is a freelance writer of politics, theology, and arts. She holds degrees from the University of St. Andrews, where she completed her Masters degree in Intellectual History, and from the University of Pennsylvania, where she received her BA in English and French Studies. Apart from The Imaginative Conservative, her work has been featured on National Review Online, The American Conservative, The American Interest, and the UK online journal Transpositions. Follow her on twitter@NayeliLRiano.

Henri Lefebvre and the Urban Revolution

By |2020-02-21T11:39:24-06:00February 21st, 2020|Categories: Capitalism, Conservatism, Economics, Philosophy|

A sociologist born at the turn of the twentieth century, Henri Lefebvre is a figure whose writings shed light on questions pertaining to rural life versus urban life, theories of the state, modernity, and the role of social space and markets in cities. Beyond sociology, he is considered an important figure in both urban [...]

The Art of Beethoven: Between Romantic and Classical

By |2020-02-13T13:08:33-06:00February 12th, 2020|Categories: Beethoven 250, Ludwig van Beethoven, Music|

Beethoven’s music would become the score for the Romantic era, as many of its champions loved how it conveyed the story of the individual, free man. Oddly enough, however, Beethoven was anything but a Romantic, nor was he a revolutionist or a democrat. There are many things that have been said about Beethoven and his [...]

Liszt and Lamartine: “Apparitions”

By |2020-01-28T15:50:50-06:00January 28th, 2020|Categories: Art, Culture, Language, Music, Poetry|

Words are only one level at which we can understand the world. Franz Liszt used sounds, melodies, and changes to convey the religious experience of Alphonse de Lamartine’s poem “Apparitions.” That is the joy of listening to classical music: It is an exercise in understanding the mind of a genius on a deeper level, [...]

Death at Yuletude: T.S. Eliot and “The Journey of the Magi”

By |2019-12-07T10:12:18-06:00December 6th, 2019|Categories: Advent, Christianity, Imagination, Literature, Poetry, T.S. Eliot|

T.S. Eliot’s “The Journey of the Magi” is as sincere a conversion poem as one can have it: No fancy light shining down from the heavens or a thunderous call to holiness; just one small event that left a Magus perplexed by a new worldview that was unsettling and strange, for it put into [...]

Globalization and Our National Anomie

By |2019-11-07T12:43:02-06:00November 10th, 2019|Categories: American Republic, Civilization, Economics, Modernity, Politics|

Technocrats and cosmopolitan politicians are abetting globalization for political influence, economic gain, and utopian delusion. We might add another incentive: A forgotten or deliberately ignored reverence for civic life. Might a hyper-focus on global advancement be contributing to a growing state of national anomie in liberal democracies worldwide? Globalization has become an ineluctable reality. [...]

John Courtney Murray and the American Civic Psyche

By |2019-08-31T21:06:23-05:00August 31st, 2019|Categories: American Republic, Declaration of Independence, Natural Law|

John Courtney Murray’s “We Hold These Truths” is hardly a tumbleweed of early-twentieth-century Catholic social thought. Though it initially helped to reconcile Catholicism and the religious pluralism that our nation champions, it is also a work that deals deeply with that taboo concept of today: patriotism. Reading John Courtney Murray’s famous work, We Hold [...]

An Introduction to English War Poetry

By |2019-08-09T21:38:25-05:00August 9th, 2019|Categories: Death, England, History, Literature, Poetry, War, World War I|

The poet’s career doesn’t end once he dies. The soldier’s career arguably does. The poet-soldier, then, has died physically, but what remains of him is his art. Both Edward Thomas and Francis Ledwidge managed to create something that transcended their persons and lasted long after being killed in war. When we think of English [...]

Nicolás Gómez Dávila: The Nietzsche From the Andes

By |2019-07-15T10:34:37-05:00July 11th, 2019|Categories: Conservatism, Culture, Liberalism, Politics, Progressivism, Western Civilization|

A philosopher in his own right, and more impressively, an autodidact, Nicolás Gómez Dávila contributed some of the most thoughtful analyses of twentieth-century thought through one of the least conventional ways of political interpretation: aphorisms. Civilization is not an endless succession of inventions and discoveries, but the task of ensuring that certain things last. [...]

The French and American Revolutions Revisited

By |2019-05-15T23:35:56-05:00May 15th, 2019|Categories: Books, History, Revolution|

Friedrich von Gentz It is often said that the American Revolution resonated across the pond and inspired the French to rebel and liberate their country in a similar, heroic fashion to that of their American allies. The nature of these two revolutions, however, ran divergent intellectual courses that made their causes, and [...]

James Burnham’s & Daniel Bell’s Critiques of Globalization & Liberalism

By |2019-05-02T20:50:26-05:00May 2nd, 2019|Categories: Capitalism, Civilization, Economics, History, Politics|

The rise of a post-industrial, technologically advanced society affected social and economic structures worldwide. James Burnham and Daniel Bell foresaw how drastically society would change over the following decades, as well as the consequences of these tendencies toward globalism and liberalism. We like to say that every idea, every thought, every emotion—no matter how [...]

Unearthed History: The War of The Vendée

By |2019-04-23T23:44:18-05:00April 23rd, 2019|Categories: Catholicism, Europe, History, Revolution|

The series of battles that took place in the Vendée have been almost entirely excluded from any recounting of the Revolution. Why? The rising in the Vendée paints a darker picture of the evils that Revolutionists did to those citizens, most of them peasants, who would not adopt the principles of the Revolution. Something about the [...]