Nayeli Riano

About Nayeli Riano

Nayeli Riano is a freelance writer of politics, theology, and arts. She holds degrees from the University of St. Andrews, where she completed her Masters degree in Intellectual History, and from the University of Pennsylvania, where she received her BA in English and French Studies. Apart from The Imaginative Conservative, her work has been featured on National Review Online, The American Conservative, The American Interest, and the UK online journal Transpositions. Follow her on twitter@NayeliLRiano.

Unearthed History: The War of The Vendée

By |2019-04-23T23:44:18-05:00April 23rd, 2019|Categories: Catholicism, Europe, History, Revolution|

The series of battles that took place in the Vendée have been almost entirely excluded from any recounting of the Revolution. Why? The rising in the Vendée paints a darker picture of the evils that Revolutionists did to those citizens, most of them peasants, who would not adopt the principles of the Revolution. Something about the [...]

William Warburton’s “Via Media” Between Church and State

By |2019-04-05T13:21:54-05:00April 4th, 2019|Categories: Civil Society, Europe, History, Religion|

William Warburton was a man who, as a theologian living through the debates of the Enlightenment, readapted his role while staying true to its intentions. His was a distinctive voice in these debates because he attacked all sides equally, seeing a paradox between human thought and history. Part of the purpose of intellectual history [...]

John Locke on “The Reasonableness of Christianity”

By |2019-03-15T20:59:46-05:00March 14th, 2019|Categories: Books, Christianity, John Locke, Morality, Philosophy, Reason, Religion, Theology|

A primary theme that runs throughout The Reasonableness of Christianity is John Locke’s belief that men who attempt to understand natural law and morality through their faculty of reason alone often fail at their task. But why is it that reason alone, also according to Locke, can explain Revelation? The question this essay poses might seem somewhat [...]

The Hobbes-Bramhall Debate on Liberty and Necessity

By |2019-02-28T23:53:28-05:00February 28th, 2019|Categories: Civil Society, Government, Leviathan, Monarchy, Political Philosophy, Politics, Western Civilization|

Despite their contrasting metaphysics, Thomas Hobbes and John Bramhall were Royalist supporters during the English Civil War. Both men believed that monarchy was the best form of government despite their opposing perceptions of liberty. If philosophy influences politics, why then would two thinkers’ opposing philosophical views result in support for the same form of [...]

A Foray Into Metaphysical Poetry With John Donne

By |2019-02-14T22:03:36-05:00February 14th, 2019|Categories: John Donne, Literature, Poetry|

Something about the way in which metaphysical poetry engages the mind is unique to this style of verse. A combination of relatable simplicity with conceptual eclecticism renders it into a form of expression that can be deeply and personally felt by the reader, but only once he works through the poet’s intricate analogies and [...]

Blaise Pascal: The Mathematical and the Intuitive Mind

By |2019-02-01T10:53:24-05:00January 31st, 2019|Categories: Blaise Pascal, Christianity, Great Books, Philosophy, Religion|

Blaise Pascal’s argument in favor of Christianity was simple: Faith is so perceptible, even so palpable, to the intuition that man needs only to be in the world to realize that there must be more. Christianity has a direct connection to the heart; as Pascal said, “the heart has its reasons, which reason does not know”... [...]

T.S. Eliot’s “The Fire Sermon”: Of Memory & Salvation

By |2019-01-13T21:57:22-05:00January 13th, 2019|Categories: Conservatism, Great Books, Modernity, Poetry, T.S. Eliot, Timeless Essays|

T.S. Eliot reminds us that the answers to our soul’s depravity are all around us, in our collective culture—the books we read, the places we inhabit, the music we listen to—but also that culture can only survive if we remember it and keep it alive... Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords our readers [...]

Poetry? What Is It Good For?

By |2019-02-18T02:38:42-05:00December 20th, 2018|Categories: Beauty, Culture, Humanities, Liberal Arts, Literature, Poetry|

Poetry is a paradox. It is the most complex and inimitable expression of thought and consciousness, but it is also the most natural and ancient. Although a form of oral and written tradition that has persisted throughout the years, poetry is dismissed as unnecessary and impractical in literary education… A decline in English majors at universities [...]

Leo Strauss vs. Edmund Burke

By |2018-12-03T23:04:44-05:00December 3rd, 2018|Categories: Books, Edmund Burke, History, Leo Strauss, Nature, Philosophy, Political Philosophy, Reason, Truth|

What ought to take primacy when carrying out research and interpreting seminal books: the text itself, or the context? A known critic of historicism and contextualism, Leo Strauss published his seminal essay, ‘What is Political Philosophy?’ in 1957 in the Journal of Politics and introduced a problem with the field: Modern academic obsessions over [...]

T.S. Eliot’s “The Fire Sermon”: Of Memory & Salvation

By |2017-11-03T21:03:24-05:00August 8th, 2017|Categories: Conservatism, Featured, Modernity, St. Augustine, T.S. Eliot|

T.S. Eliot reminds us that the answers to our soul’s depravity are all around us, in our collective culture—the books we read, the places we inhabit, the music we listen to—but also that culture can only survive if we remember it and keep it alive… “These things I do within, in that vast chamber [...]