Chuck Chalberg

Chuck Chalberg

About Chuck Chalberg

John C. “Chuck” Chalberg teaches American History at Normandale Community College, writes from Minnesota, and brings history to life in the persons of G.K. Chesterton, George Orwell, H.L. Mencken, Branch Rickey, and Teddy Roosevelt at History on Stage.

Bernie Sanders & Dreams of an American Sweden

By |2019-11-25T23:57:16-06:00November 11th, 2019|Categories: American Republic, History, John C. Calhoun, Politics|

Will a Sanders-like agenda produce eventual Democratic success at the polls? Maybe so or maybe not. Either way, it could lead to the achievement of Senator Sanders’ cherished goal of an American Sweden. While Senator Bernie Sanders may never be president, his oft-stated goal may one day be realized. This is especially so, if [...]

George Kennan’s Diaries

By |2019-09-04T23:49:16-06:00September 4th, 2019|Categories: American Republic, Books, Civilization, Cold War, Europe, Foreign Affairs, Politics, War|

George Kennan was—and remains—an important, even compelling, figure in the early history of the Cold War. But these selections from his voluminous and often overwrought diaries reveal him to have been something other than what this honest, if not always moderate, this calm, but not always cool, and detached professional diplomat took himself to [...]

George Will’s “The Conservative Sensibility”

By |2019-08-21T22:27:52-06:00August 21st, 2019|Categories: American Founding, Books, Conservatism, Government, Politics|

In “The Conservative Sensibility,” George Will posits that taming the administrative state and restoring the principles of the American Founding is the great American political project of the 21st century. But is the country up to the task? The Conservative Sensibility, by George F. Will (640 pages, Hachette Books, 2019) If prudence is a [...]

“American Priest”: Father Ted Hesburgh’s Ambition & Conflicted Legacy

By |2019-07-14T02:34:27-06:00July 13th, 2019|Categories: Books, Catholicism, Christianity, Education, Leadership|

Can there be such a thing as a great Catholic university, if greatness is defined as Princeton and Harvard and Yale—and Fr. Hesburgh—would define it? Probably not. Fr. Hesburgh failed to achieve the goal that he set for himself, while succeeding greatly at something that he did not set out to do. American Priest: [...]

When Republicans Were Progressive

By |2019-05-30T15:31:54-06:00May 30th, 2019|Categories: Books, Politics, Progressivism, Republicans|

Always seeking a perch somewhere just slightly to the right of center, Senator David Durenberger regarded government as a problem-solver of something other than the first resort. Today he is not so sure. When Republicans Were Progressive, by Dave Durenberger (296 pages, Minnesota Historical Society Press, 2018) Long before the country was divided into [...]

“My Name Is Lazarus”: G.K. Chesterton’s Converts

By |2019-05-18T22:19:36-06:00May 18th, 2019|Categories: Books, Catholicism, Christianity, G.K. Chesterton|

In “My Name is Lazarus,” a collection of thirty-four essays by thirty-four Chesterton-influenced converts, Dale Ahlquist presents us with a compelling anthology of personal redemption stories. Each tells a story that hits home—probably because each tells a story of coming home. My Name is Lazarus: 34 Stories of Converts Whose Path to Rome Was [...]

What President Trump Has in Common With President Polk

By |2019-10-03T15:11:38-06:00February 15th, 2019|Categories: American Republic, Donald Trump, History, Politics, Presidency|

If James K. Polk can be credited with adding a huge swath of territory to the American empire, might Donald Trump one day be credited with preserving that long ago victory by reversing the gradual makeover of the southwestern United States? The game of presidential parallels can be endlessly fascinating. Sometimes it can also [...]

Walter Camp and the Creation of American Football

By |2019-11-07T12:46:19-06:00February 1st, 2019|Categories: Books, Character, Culture, Football, History, Sports|

While the evolution of collegiate football was gradual, its rise in popularity was quite sudden—and it all began with Walter Camp, consummate Yale man and watch company executive. Minneapolis lawyer Roger Tamte has now given us the definitive Camp biography… Walter Camp and the Creation of American Football by Roger R. Tamte (408 pages, University [...]

The Diversity Delusion: Race and Gender in Our Universities

By |2019-08-08T15:16:40-06:00December 20th, 2018|Categories: Books, Culture War, Education, Ideology, Modernity, Progressivism, Western Civilization|

Heather Mac Donald has written a no-holds-barred attack on the modern American university, where the absence of courage is only the tip of a very large and menacing iceberg… The Diversity Delusion: How Race and Gender Pandering Corrupt the University and Undermine Our Culture by Heather Mac Donald (288 pages, St. Martin’s Press, 2018) This [...]

Bob Woodward: Journalist or Gossip Columnist?

By |2018-10-09T09:43:15-06:00October 9th, 2018|Categories: Government, Journalism, Politics|

So the Bob Woodward has done it again. He has concocted yet another tell-all account of the mostly forgettable doings of yet another set of temporarily memorable Washington figures. And once again he has done so on the basis of unnamed sources. It’s all so tiresome and predictable. What was neither tiresome nor predictable was the work of [...]

Meeting a Lost Soul in the Skies

By |2018-10-04T16:19:00-06:00October 4th, 2018|Categories: Compassion, Responsibility, Virtue|

On airplanes my druthers is to mind my own business. I don’t want to be rude, but I much prefer reading to chatting. And that’s precisely what I did for almost the entirety of a recent flight. Nothing out of the ordinary here. It’s my usual pattern. And it generally works, especially if one avoids small talk right [...]