Religion

The Romantic Theology of Charles Williams

By |2019-12-04T21:15:06-06:00December 4th, 2019|Categories: Bradley J. Birzer, Christianity, Culture, Inklings, Love, Marriage, Religion, Senior Contributors, Theology|

Just as we consume the Eucharist at Mass, recognizing the holiness of the act, so some marriages become profound examples and witnesses of holiness. By habit and faith, Charles Williams contended, the serious Christian begins to see all meals as a shadow of the Eucharist and all love as a shadow of Holy Matrimony. [...]

The Comforts of Religion: Gustave Flaubert’s “Madame Bovary”

By |2019-11-30T03:15:16-06:00November 30th, 2019|Categories: Books, Christianity, Europe, Faith, Fiction, Imagination, Literature, Religion|

The nineteenth century was a difficult and dynamic period for the French nation, as citizens of all classes and philosophical persuasions struggled to come to terms with modernity. These struggles are reflected in Gustave Flaubert’s first novel, Madame Bovary, published as a complete text in 1857. The story is well-known: Emma Bovary finds herself [...]

Proclamation Appointing a Day of Thanksgiving and Prayer

By |2019-11-28T12:32:53-06:00November 27th, 2019|Categories: American Founding, American Republic, Presidency, Religion, Thanksgiving, Thomas Jefferson|

Whereas the Honourable the General Congress, impressed with a grateful sense of the goodness of Almighty God, in blessing the greater part of this extensive continent with plentiful harvests, crowning our arms with repeated successes, conducting us hitherto safely through the perils with which we have been encompassed and manifesting in multiplied instances his divine care [...]

A Guide Through “Hevel”: The Teacher of Ecclesiastes

By |2019-11-26T21:33:14-06:00November 23rd, 2019|Categories: Christianity, Culture, Religion, Wisdom|

Ecclesiastes is quite possibly the most controversial book in the Bible for all the wrong reasons. Many Christians avoid Ecclesiastes because of its overwhelming bleakness. Others prefer Job to Ecclesiastes’ nihilistic overtones and recurring cynicism. In fact, as some pastors observe, Ecclesiastes “is so denigrated by some Christians, that they have wondered why it [...]

The Silent Witness of “Metropolis”

By |2019-11-22T02:36:59-06:00November 21st, 2019|Categories: Christianity, Culture, Dystopia, Film, Modernity, Religion|

A remnant from the late ‘20s, “Metropolis” has come into the light once again and in a more complete way. While the industrial environment and modern work have changed, the concern for social justice and questions about technology are just as intense as they were when the film premiered. In a search for movies [...]

The Radical Equality of Christianity

By |2019-10-20T00:12:23-06:00October 19th, 2019|Categories: Bradley J. Birzer, Christendom, Christianity, Civilization, Culture, Equality, Religion, Senior Contributors|

In our world of recriminating hatreds—in which we desire more to label those we don’t like as sexist, imperialist, racist, homophobic, transphobic, and, simultaneously, mark ourselves as victims—we often forget some important historical truths. Here’s one we conveniently ignore, dismiss, or mock: Nothing in the world has brought about more equality and justice than [...]

The Problem With Anne Hutchinson

By |2019-10-04T23:31:40-06:00October 4th, 2019|Categories: Christianity, Culture, History, Religion|

Anne Hutchinson bewitches most college students. When analyzing her trial transcripts, with her clever and sarcastic repartee with Massachusetts Bay Governor John Winthrop and the Puritan ministers, they come to admire her greatly. Whiggishness creeps into their interpretation of her words and actions, seeing her as a harbinger of contemporary liberty. They believe that [...]

Legalizing the Resurrection

By |2019-09-09T11:52:05-06:00August 30th, 2019|Categories: Conservatism, Glenn Arbery, Modernity, Religion, Senior Contributors, Wyoming Catholic College|

Many in our society consider religion merely an instrument of power, and they believe that the “correction” of inherited beliefs and practices can be forced upon the unwilling. But there’s an enormous difference between people who choose the real common good and people forced to submit to a state ideology. When I went into [...]

The Eucharist and the Imagination

By |2019-06-29T15:40:53-06:00June 29th, 2019|Categories: Catholicism, Christianity, Imagination, Michael De Sapio, Senior Contributors, Theology|

The Christian belief in the Eucharist stands as a universal expression of faith in a transcendent value that exists beyond human effort, to which we can nevertheless strive through faith. It would be hard to find anything in the history of civilization quite like this mystical belief that bound Christians together in communion for [...]

The Early Church & the Origins of Religious Liberty

By |2019-10-16T12:06:13-06:00June 28th, 2019|Categories: American Founding, Christianity, Freedom of Religion, Politics, Religion|

From Tertullian, a North African Christian writer of the early third century, to the Reformation, there is a significant Christian tradition that affirms religious freedom. The origin story of religious liberty commonly cited in college courses and museums, informed by proponents of the so-called Whig view of history, goes something like this. In the [...]

America’s Uneven Legacy of Religious Freedom

By |2019-06-12T23:46:56-06:00June 12th, 2019|Categories: American Republic, Bradley J. Birzer, History, Religion, Senior Contributors|

As we enter into a period of radical uncertainty regarding religious freedom—especially for Catholics, as witnessed most recently by the anti-confession laws in California—it is worth re-considering America’s track record on the issue. Frankly, it’s not good. Or, perhaps, it’s better to state, when it’s good, it’s good, but when it’s bad, it’s really [...]

In the Ruins of Babylon: The Poetic “Genius” of John Keats

By |2019-05-29T23:11:39-06:00May 29th, 2019|Categories: Christianity, Culture, Love, Paul Krause, Poetry, Religion, Senior Contributors|

The poetry of John Keats is a window into the mad genius of the Romantics: their lusts and hopes; their ambitions and ignorance; their radicalism and fantasies. In reading Keats, one is simultaneously scandalized and sympathetic to the longing of the Romantic heart. “The best things we have come from madness.” John Keats died [...]

The Sri Lanka Church Bombings: The Saudi Pestilence Spreads

By |2019-04-24T23:09:25-06:00April 24th, 2019|Categories: Civilization, Joseph Mussomeli, Middle East, Muslim, Politics, Religion, Senior Contributors|

The history of Sri Lanka through the Fifties to the present time is a sobering reminder to those who fail to see that unrestrained democracy can lead to the tyranny of the majority and that robust diversity is as often a cause of friction and strife as it is a strength to be celebrated. [...]