The Invention of Science: The Telescope & the Book of Job

By |2020-04-04T14:12:16-05:00April 4th, 2020|Categories: Atheism, Books, Christianity, Culture, History, Modernity, Religion, Science|

The Invention of Science by David Wootton is a dense, thought-provoking, and encyclopedic account of the Scientific Revolution. The book is an intellectual history, focusing mainly on the mental paradigm shift that the Revolution brought to Western Civilization. How man thinks about the natural world post-Revolution is not the same as how man thought before [...]

Motion, Moments, & Sculptural Art: The Imagination and Time

By |2020-03-28T18:25:26-05:00March 28th, 2020|Categories: Christianity, Imagination, Philosophy, Religion, Theology, Time|

The imagination allows the human experience to be of both motion and stability, both becoming and being—but could it be that contained in our experience of time is an experience of divine nature? In his Consolation of Philosophy, Boethius writes that “the infinite motion of temporal things tries to imitate the ever present immobility [...]

The Divine Discontent of the Atheist Heart

By |2020-03-14T16:21:51-05:00March 14th, 2020|Categories: Atheism, Christianity, Culture, David Deavel, Religion, Senior Contributors|

Like all human beings, the atheist ones I’ve seen and known are always prattling on about justice and injustice. But atheists don’t seem to realize that there is such a category as “should” because there is a design for the world that we perceive. Atheists do not believe in God, but I confess that [...]

Byzantium’s Orphans, Rome’s Foundlings: The Legacy of the Greek Unionists

By |2020-03-11T13:28:22-05:00March 11th, 2020|Categories: Christendom, Christianity, Culture, History, Religion, Theology, Western Civilization|

The admonitions of Byzantine’s unionists resonate well beyond the Fall of Constantinople—if we had but ears to hear them. Indeed, we today, standing amidst the threatened walls of the house of the West that was once known as Christendom must cherish a culture of Christian solidarity, the conviction that the City of God is [...]

For Thine is the Kingdom: Tom Holland’s “Dominion”

By |2020-03-07T16:53:58-06:00March 7th, 2020|Categories: Books, Christendom, Christianity, Civilization, Culture, Dwight Longenecker, History, Religion, Senior Contributors, Western Civilization|

Like a queen who rides a bicycle, Tom Holland’s “Dominion” is both majestic and down-to-earth. From antiquity to modernity, Mr. Holland traces a sneaky thesis that Christianity has changed the world—transforming it from the inside out. Dominion: How the Christian Revolution Remade the World, by Tom Holland (624 pages, Basic Books, 2019) Every once [...]

In Defense of Dark Corners

By |2020-02-29T06:46:13-06:00February 29th, 2020|Categories: Architecture, Beauty, Christianity, Civilization, Culture, Dwight Longenecker, Religion, Senior Contributors, Western Civilization|

There are dark corners to be explored in a great church. Instead of vast seating space, bright with electric light, huge speakers hanging from the beams, and padded pews, give me the darkened chapel where ancient monks recited their daily prayers. Give me the dark corner of a crumbling cloister, the dark corner of [...]

The War of the Gods and Demons

By |2020-02-22T21:48:55-06:00February 22nd, 2020|Categories: Aeneas, Aeneid, Culture, Fiction, Literature, Louis Markos, Religion, Senior Contributors|

Playwright David Lane has graced the Christian community with a formal, blank-verse play that takes up the war of gods and demons. “Dido: The Tragedy of a Woman” retells the tragic tale of the “Aeneid,” but with some dramatic plot twists that allow it to function both as a timeless meditation on the universal issues [...]

The Rise of Anglo-Catholicism

By |2020-02-15T22:03:03-06:00February 15th, 2020|Categories: Anglicanism, Catholicism, Christianity, Culture, History, Religion, Theology|

On November 4, 2009, Pope Benedict XVI issued an Apostolic Constitution, Anglicanorum Coetibus, in response to “groups of Anglicans” who had petitioned “repeatedly and insistently to be received into full Catholic communion individually as well as corporately,” which created for them a new ecclesiastical structure: the Personal Ordinariates. The stated purpose of these was [...]

On the Fear of Religion

By |2020-02-15T11:44:04-06:00February 15th, 2020|Categories: Atheism, Blaise Pascal, Christianity, Culture, Philosophy, Religion, Senior Contributors, Theology|

Blaise Pascal wrote that men hate religion and “are afraid it is true.” But can we agree with him? Some have made clear a hatred for it, but do they fear it? And what about the wider culture? Do people today, generally speaking, fear religion? The renowned physicist Stephen Hawking once heckled that the [...]

Saint Augustine on Figurative Language in Scripture

By |2020-02-09T02:20:00-06:00February 8th, 2020|Categories: Christianity, Christine Norvell, Culture, Education, Religion, Senior Contributors, St. Augustine, Theology|

It’s true that when trying to understanding Scripture we need to establish an analysis of concrete terms. But if we aren’t careful, we just might explain away the beauty of descriptive language the Bible. Saint Augustine of Hippo encountered the same issue, and not just among his youngest students. In humanities coursework, we often [...]

Sacred Truths in a Profane World

By |2020-03-04T16:41:57-06:00February 2nd, 2020|Categories: Christianity, Culture, Homosexual Unions, Islam, Marriage, Religion, Roger Scruton, Timeless Essays, Truth|

By and large the educated elites in the Western world today are without religious belief and often animated by what I call a “culture of repudiation,” keen to banish old ideas of the sacred from public life and to remake the institutions and structures of civil society so as to reflect their own liberated lifestyle. [...]

Milton’s Erotic Cosmos

By |2020-02-01T23:21:55-06:00February 1st, 2020|Categories: Christianity, Great Books, Imagination, John Milton, Literature, Paul Krause, Poetry, Senior Contributors, Theology, Uncategorized|

John Milton’s “Paradise Lost” is an intense poem, a passionate poem, an erotic poem. From the visual imagery to the very descriptive language Milton uses to portray his lively scenes to us, there is no escaping the reality of the life force that moves his poem. Why, however, did  Milton choose to write such [...]

Russell Kirk’s Beauty and Civilization

By |2020-01-31T22:18:17-06:00January 31st, 2020|Categories: Beauty, Bradley J. Birzer, Conservatism, Modernity, Religion, Russell Kirk, Senior Contributors, Western Civilization|

In the late 1950s, as Russell Kirk considered what needed to be conserved in the Western tradition as well as what needed to be discarded, he lamented that much of what the West did was “uglify.”  It had forgotten not only the necessity of beauty, but it had forgotten how to define beauty. It [...]