Religion

Donald Trump and Religious Liberty

By |2020-01-20T17:00:02-06:00January 20th, 2020|Categories: American Founding, American Republic, Constitution, Government, Liberalism, Politics, Religion, Republicanism|

Many of America’s founders defended religious liberty, believing it grounded on the duty men and women have to worship their Creator. As late as the 1990s, Democrats and Republicans were able to work together to protect that liberty, but unfortunately, the political left has begun to abandon religious freedom. As the 2020 presidential campaign [...]

Humanism as Realism

By |2020-01-17T15:33:35-06:00January 17th, 2020|Categories: Christian Humanism, Conservatism, Irving Babbitt, Modernity, Paul Elmer More, Philosophy, Political Philosophy, Religion|

We live in a world completely mastered and permeated by economic ideals, yet expecting better government within societies brought up on humanitarian thinking strikes us as yet another fantasy. Much has changed since the solutions posited by humanist thinkers of the last century, so what can we do in this world? What can we [...]

The Implications of the Logos for Christianity

By |2020-01-15T15:12:10-06:00January 15th, 2020|Categories: Bradley J. Birzer, Christian Humanism, Christianity, Culture, Religion, Senior Contributors|

If, as established in my two previous two essays*, the Logos has its roots in ancient pagan as well as ancient Hebraic thought, what does this mean for Christianity and its adoption of the term? Clearly, the most blatant manifestations of the Greco-Hebraic concept of the Logos—the eternal Word, the unending fire, thought, and [...]

The Magi and the Obstinacy of Belief

By |2020-01-05T20:21:13-06:00January 5th, 2020|Categories: Books, Christianity, Culture, Dwight Longenecker, History, Religion, Senior Contributors|

The refusal to consider the possibility that the Magi were historical figures and not mythical magicians reflects the bias of both modernists and conservative believers. For Saint Matthew’s Gospel to actually be true rocks both their boats. My friend Sir Colin Humphreys wrote a book some time ago called The Miracles of Exodus. Sir [...]

Viktor Orbán, Defender of Christianity

By |2020-01-04T14:33:27-06:00January 4th, 2020|Categories: Christianity, Conservatism, Europe, Foreign Affairs, Government, Islam, Politics, Religion, Viktor Orbán, Western Civilization|

Prime Minister Viktor Orbán of Hungary links the persecution of Christians in other parts of the globe to the increasing hostility towards mainstream Christianity in Europe. A “mysterious force seals the lips,” he asserts, not only of politicians in the West to this persecution, but also of most of those in the media. Is [...]

Leadership, Hypocrisy, and Dante’s “Inferno”

By |2020-01-03T07:25:25-06:00January 2nd, 2020|Categories: C.S. Lewis, Christian Living, Christianity, Culture, Religion, Virtue|

C.S. Lewis once wrote that “of all the bad men, religious bad men are the worst.” Reflecting on the various revelations in the Church within the past year that involved poor leadership, hypocrisy, and scandalizing behavior to say the least, it is hard not to think of the words of C.S. Lewis and recall [...]

E.E. Evans-Pritchard, Lived Religion, & the Libyan Jihad

By |2019-12-29T00:02:51-06:00December 28th, 2019|Categories: Books, Civilization, Conservatism, History, Islam, Muslim, Religion|

The moral imagination of E.E. Evans-Pritchard’s anthropology discerned great value in the cultures he studied, and he spoke out against the destruction of that value. By doing so he exhibited the finest elements of his own particular Western cultural inheritance, as a Christian, English gentleman, who was later, and appropriately, knighted. Evans-Pritchard’s The Sanusi [...]

Athena as Founder & Statesman

By |2019-12-27T17:59:57-06:00December 27th, 2019|Categories: Justice, Literature, Myth, Politics, Religion, Statesman, Timeless Essays|

In the “Oresteia,” Aeschylus examines whether a city exists for proper worship of gods or whether it exists for proper cultivation of “that which is most divine in us.” Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords our readers the opportunity to join John Alvis, as he considers Aeschylus’ views of the polity as embodied [...]

The Scandal of Christmas

By |2019-12-22T03:34:19-06:00December 21st, 2019|Categories: Christianity, Christmas, Culture, Dwight Longenecker, Religion, Senior Contributors, Theology|

The Nativity is an outrage. God who is outside of time should not step into time. God the omnipotent should not become a helpless child. God the all-knowing should not empty himself and lock himself into the limitations of mortality. However, it is the incredible outrage of it all that gives one pause. After [...]

How to Think about God: A Pagan “Mere Christianity”

By |2019-12-14T16:06:27-06:00December 14th, 2019|Categories: Books, Bradley J. Birzer, Christianity, Cicero, Culture, Great Books, Religion, Senior Contributors, Western Civilization|

Princeton University Press’s most recent volume, “How to Think About God,” is a handbook of paganism, an antique “Mere Christianity.” While none of its wisdom will get you to Heaven, it will certainly help you lead a better and more fulfilling life here and now. Over the last several years, Princeton University Press has [...]

The Romantic Theology of Charles Williams

By |2019-12-04T21:15:06-06:00December 4th, 2019|Categories: Bradley J. Birzer, Christianity, Culture, Inklings, Love, Marriage, Religion, Senior Contributors, Theology|

Just as we consume the Eucharist at Mass, recognizing the holiness of the act, so some marriages become profound examples and witnesses of holiness. By habit and faith, Charles Williams contended, the serious Christian begins to see all meals as a shadow of the Eucharist and all love as a shadow of Holy Matrimony. [...]

The Comforts of Religion: Gustave Flaubert’s “Madame Bovary”

By |2019-11-30T03:15:16-06:00November 30th, 2019|Categories: Books, Christianity, Europe, Faith, Fiction, Imagination, Literature, Religion|

The nineteenth century was a difficult and dynamic period for the French nation, as citizens of all classes and philosophical persuasions struggled to come to terms with modernity. These struggles are reflected in Gustave Flaubert’s first novel, Madame Bovary, published as a complete text in 1857. The story is well-known: Emma Bovary finds herself [...]

Proclamation Appointing a Day of Thanksgiving and Prayer

By |2019-11-28T12:32:53-06:00November 27th, 2019|Categories: American Founding, American Republic, Presidency, Religion, Thanksgiving, Thomas Jefferson|

Whereas the Honourable the General Congress, impressed with a grateful sense of the goodness of Almighty God, in blessing the greater part of this extensive continent with plentiful harvests, crowning our arms with repeated successes, conducting us hitherto safely through the perils with which we have been encompassed and manifesting in multiplied instances his divine care [...]

A Guide Through “Hevel”: The Teacher of Ecclesiastes

By |2019-11-26T21:33:14-06:00November 23rd, 2019|Categories: Christianity, Culture, Religion, Wisdom|

Ecclesiastes is quite possibly the most controversial book in the Bible for all the wrong reasons. Many Christians avoid Ecclesiastes because of its overwhelming bleakness. Others prefer Job to Ecclesiastes’ nihilistic overtones and recurring cynicism. In fact, as some pastors observe, Ecclesiastes “is so denigrated by some Christians, that they have wondered why it [...]