“The Cross and the Lynching Tree”: Race and Religion

By |2020-08-29T10:56:38-05:00August 29th, 2020|Categories: Books, Christianity, Culture, Dwight Longenecker, Equality, Religion, Senior Contributors|

James Cone’s “The Cross and the Lynching Tree” is a passionate and excellent contribution to the discussion of race and religion from the perspective of African-American believers and should help white Christians to see the world from the viewpoint of their black brothers and sisters. The Cross and the Lynching Tree, by James Cone [...]

Aquinas and the Theology of Grace in Michelangelo’s “The Last Judgement”

By |2020-08-20T14:02:34-05:00August 22nd, 2020|Categories: Art, Christianity, Culture, Heaven, St. Thomas Aquinas, Theology|

Portraying the souls of the faithful and those of the damned, “The Last Judgement” of Michelangelo serves as a powerful reminder of the theology of grace and of the importance of one’s own volition in accepting and actively cooperating with the grace which God so freely gives to men. The Last Judgement [...]

Decay or Rebirth: The Sources of Cultural Progress

By |2020-08-11T16:18:40-05:00August 14th, 2020|Categories: Christianity, Culture, Family, Government, Politics, Religion|

The hope of virtuous social change is a good thing, but the change starts first in the soul of religious conviction and the hearth of the family before government can support and enact positive change. When advocates of social welfare deny the foundations of faith and family, they deny the foundations of progress in [...]

Hagia Sophia: Once a Church, Always a Church

By |2020-08-09T08:56:06-05:00August 8th, 2020|Categories: Architecture, Christianity, Culture, Religion, Secularism, Western Civilization|

Every awe-inspiring element of Hagia Sophia is a testament to our Christian faith that should make us feel proud of our cultural heritage, even in today’s society where our churches are defaced and adapted for secular use. The church is undeniably Christian in spirit and character, no matter how many times its use is [...]

Was Beethoven a Believer? The Case of the “Missa Solemnis”

By |2020-08-20T15:54:02-05:00August 1st, 2020|Categories: Audio/Video, Beethoven 250, Catholicism, Ludwig van Beethoven, Music, Religion, Timeless Essays|

Can an unbeliever, a denier of the faith, produce such music as Beethoven did in his Missa Solemnis? It has long been fashionable in music history textbooks to speak of Beethoven’s Missa Solemnis as a purely artistic statement that, to be blunt, uses the texts of the Catholic Mass as a convenient springboard for musical experimentation and [...]

“Hungary”

By |2020-06-28T19:53:00-05:00June 26th, 2020|Categories: Character, Christianity, Fiction, History, Imagination, Religion|

History’s tyrants and thieves remain with us, and if things get very dark sometimes, then my best hope is to do the right thing in the light of His Grace. That’s all I can hope to do, passing on that Grace whenever I can. It’s strange how I can’t remember this guy’s whole name [...]

The Catholic School in the Pluralist Polis

By |2020-06-20T16:52:04-05:00June 20th, 2020|Categories: Catholicism, Culture, Education, Modernity, Religion, Truth, Worldview|

A traditional liberal arts curriculum elevates the tastes, ennobles the sentiments, and orders the mind to truth: Socratic questioning forces critical reflection on the content and coherency of one’s ideas; a vigorous and integrated life of grace and prayer keeps the mind and heart strong, pure, integrated, and focused on Jesus Christ. Yet to [...]

“Robinson Crusoe” and Modernity

By |2020-06-02T17:52:50-05:00June 2nd, 2020|Categories: Books, Imagination, Literature, Modernity, Religion|

“Robinson Crusoe” contains profound messages for us today. It is an enactment of the modern, secular individual making his way alone in the world and overcoming challenges through the power of his own unaided reason. At the same time, in pointing to a religious interpretation of existence that is never quite fully experienced, it [...]

The Literary Saint, John Henry Newman

By |2020-06-01T14:00:48-05:00May 30th, 2020|Categories: Catholicism, Christianity, Culture, Literature, Religion, Sainthood, St. John Henry Newman, Theology|

John Henry Newman’s life illustrated a truth: It is only through quietly embracing selfless love that human suffering reaches a denouement, epitomized in the life of Christ. When gloom encircles, when hope is extinguishing, it is precisely in that moment Jesus Christ dwells, hunched over and bloodied, carrying his cross to Calvary, in a [...]

Christopher Dawson and the Religious Impulse

By |2020-05-23T17:30:06-05:00May 23rd, 2020|Categories: Books, Christianity, Christopher Dawson, Civilization, Culture, Government, History, Religion|

How does religion act as a driving force of politics and culture? Christoper Dawson argued that “we cannot understand the inner form of a society unless we understand its religion,” and we cannot make sense of any culture or its achievements without knowing the religious inspiration from which its creativity flowed. Imagine a diagram [...]

“Lord, Teach Us to Pray”: Reflections on Fulton Sheen

By |2020-05-24T10:02:23-05:00May 23rd, 2020|Categories: Books, Catholicism, Christianity, Culture, Religion|

When I was a child, my mother would regularly put my brothers and me to sleep by playing Fulton Sheen talks on tape and (later) on CD. I remember marveling first at the man’s voice, its weathered timbre and solemn cadence and massive fluctuations in volume. What held my attention next were the stories: [...]

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