Emily Kleinhenz

About Emily Kleinhenz

Emily Kleinhenz is Managing Editor at The Imaginative Conservative and graduated from Houston Baptist University with a double-major in English and Latin.

Roman Death Masks and the Role of Memory

By |2020-07-31T17:06:50-05:00July 31st, 2020|Categories: Art, Culture, Death, History, Patriotism, Rome|

Roman death masks—called “imagines”—were actually wax models impressed directly on the face during life, and they bore a remarkable likeness to the person. Displayed during the funerals of the elite, they served as a link between the present and the past and were meant to inspire attendees to patriotic virtue. The recent defacement of [...]

“Writers on Writing”: A Treasure Trove of Advice

By |2019-06-06T23:04:43-05:00June 6th, 2019|Categories: Books, Culture, Writing|

Approach this charming collection of writers’ conversations with an expectation to encounter some thought or piece of advice that you didn’t know you needed or wanted, and you will find yourself delighted with a fresh dose of enthusiasm for thoughtful, meaningful writing and story-telling. Writers on Writing: Conversations with Allen Mendenhall, edited by Allen [...]

Poetry and Scripture: Finding Truth Through Beauty

By |2018-09-22T22:50:18-05:00September 22nd, 2018|Categories: Beauty, Christianity, Poetry, Truth|

Analytic philosophy is limited in its scope regarding the knowledge of God. Richard Swinburne, a British contemporary philosopher influential for his arguments for the existence of God, admits the limitations of his field in his lecture, “What We Cannot Know about God.”[1] For example, we say that God is a Person, but we are unable [...]

Distracting Ourselves From Death

By |2018-09-14T22:02:52-05:00September 14th, 2018|Categories: Christianity, Death, Philosophy, Religion|

Although the prospect of death makes us miserable, it forces us to confront our mortality and search for a remedy, if we do not immediately numb ourselves with the drug of distraction... "Soles occidere et redire possunt [Suns are able to die and rise again]" —Gaius Valerius Catullus, Carmen 5.[1] One morning, as I walked out [...]

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